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Corker
12-04-2012, 08:48 AM
I'm always looking for ways to improve the quality of my pictures & would love to hear any tips or tricks--especially tips for on-the-water photography.

It's more of a mistake than a tip or trick, but one lesson I continue to learn the hard way is to keep the sun behind me. When the bite is on and my partner has landed a really nice fish, the natural tendency is to grab a quick picture and get back to fishing. As likely as not, the boat is positioned the wrong way for a good photo and I'll get something like this:
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii299/corker_/Pic1b.gif

By taking the few seconds necessary to fire up the TM and rotate the boat, I get the subject out of the deep shadows and a better photo like this:
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii299/corker_/Pic2b.gif

Chasing Ghosts
12-04-2012, 09:41 AM
Corker

A UV filter will make your colors pop, and a polarizing filter will let you get some fantastic shots through water on glassy days... great for bed and structure shots holding fish.

Cheers
Doug

Humminbird_Greg
12-04-2012, 10:49 AM
I'm always looking for ways to improve the quality of my pictures & would love to hear any tips or tricks--especially tips for on-the-water photography.

It's more of a mistake than a tip or trick, but one lesson I continue to learn the hard way is to keep the sun behind me. When the bite is on and my partner has landed a really nice fish, the natural tendency is to grab a quick picture and get back to fishing. As likely as not, the boat is positioned the wrong way for a good photo and I'll get something like this:
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii299/corker_/Pic1b.gif

By taking the few seconds necessary to fire up the TM and rotate the boat, I get the subject out of the deep shadows and a better photo like this:
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii299/corker_/Pic2b.gif

Lighting direction is great but if your camera has a ‘fill flash’ feature on it you can shoot the photo facing the sun if needed. This is called different things by different manufacturers so consult the manual or just try the different flash settings to find what works on yours.

Corker
12-04-2012, 11:35 AM
Sensitivity of cameras has improved so much that I've gotten in the habit of forcing my flash to stay off. I'd much rather have natural lighting than the flash, but fill flash might be a good choice. Does the "fill" cause red-eye?

Chasing Ghosts
12-04-2012, 01:14 PM
"Redeye" rarely happens during daylight, as the eye's surfece is acting as a reflector the overall light "washes out" the flash effect on the eye.

stickum
12-05-2012, 02:47 PM
As noted fill flash will solve the problem and if your camera has the "flash exposure comp" option you can turn the power down on the flash to just fill the dark areas and still produce a "natural" looking photo.

CatFan
12-05-2012, 02:59 PM
The only problem with turning them toward the sun is they'll tend to squint.

stickum
12-06-2012, 08:59 AM
You can also get some imaging software that has the capability to "open" shadows and end up with a usable image also.
Here is an example using your photo. I ran your image thru Adobe Photoshop and "opened" the shadows up a bit to show what can be done.

Before
http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii299/corker_/Pic1b.gif

After
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v714/DeepWoodsDecals/Fishing/corker_crappie_com.jpg

Corker
12-06-2012, 09:44 AM
imaging softwareYeah, I also use a graphic editor, but there's no substitute for good lighting. The editor can only do so much to salvage a poor photo.