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Thread: Harming a fish you wish to release

  1. #1
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    Default Harming a fish you wish to release

    I am curious how those of you who fish for panfish relate to this. Seems to me that, occasionally, a fish you catch will have the jig/lure deep in the throat. Recently, I was doing catch n release. With one fish, I got bit on tight line and was shocked that the bluegill had the jig deep in its throat. I figured it would be tough to get it out without harming the fish and I was right. Even with very narrow forceps, I saw blood. I then kept the fish in the livewell to observe, thinking that if it died, I would take it home for cleaning. Along with a couple of others because if I am going to clean a fish, I want to clean at least three. Well, that fish died and I mean quick. I was really surprised. Fish are fragile! How the heck could that fish die so quick? There had to be some serious internal damage. I didn't get rough trying to get the hook out but there was, obviously, some trauma. So, there you have it; catch n release didn't work for this one.

    So, what do you guys do? Do you think you have some super technique to remove a hook with no harm? If so, what? Do you find that this happens sometimes no matter what you do? The problem with bream is they have such a tiny mouth. I don't recall this happening with crappie; if it has, it's been a very long time ago.

    This is a common problem with bass, especially fishing a soft plastic bait such as a fluke, which looks like a shad. You better not dally or the bass will inhale it. There is a technique for removing a hook in a bass' throat by going behind the gill plate but I have yet to master it and it's often portrayed as an easy technique.

    I just do not want to return a fish to the lake that may die, it seems wasteful. Yeah, turtles and such gotta eat but it bugs me. And sometimes, I don't want to clean fish if I have plenty!
    ~~~
    Bill

  2. #2
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    i try to keep large ones if they look to be hurt badly .
    but sometimes off they go anyway , if they dont come back up , i think they might survive
    sum kawl me tha outlaw ketchn whales
    Likes skeetbum LIKED above post

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ketchn View Post
    i try to keep large ones if they look to be hurt badly .
    but sometimes off they go anyway , if they dont come back up , i think they might survive
    Sometimes that’s all you can do. I guess down deep with the gills it is pretty fragile. I would much rather miss a strike and not get one rather than injure it. No way I would take any fish home from my home water.
    Bob

  4. #4
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    If I see blood on a fish, I keep him. Unless he is too small to clean, and I have cleaned some small ones!, then I throw him back and let the other fish eat him.
    Dwyane
    The only place where success comes before work is in the dictionary!

    SMILE- A curve that can set a lot of things straight!

  5. #5
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    The fish, turtles and birds have to eat as well. My goal is to not injure any that I wish to release. It at times does happen
    :I would like to thank the builders of docks for giving me a place to fish and lose tackle
    Likes shadow LIKED above post

  6. #6
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    I don’t think I’ve ever had a fish take a jig too deep.

    A bare hook is more likely to be swallowed, but a disgorger will take care of that 95% of the time. They’re much better than pliers or hemostats.

  7. #7
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    If it's deep and I'm ketching& releasing. I cut the line and he's on his own.

    Sent from my E6910 using Crappie.com Fishing mobile app

  8. #8
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    Name:  dehookerversion1.jpg
Views: 166
Size:  39.8 KBI have been having too many brim and shellcrackers swallowing the #6 truturn hooks deep. I was thinking I need something better than Hemostats. I just made these 3 hook degorgers from some old broken carbon arrows. I'm hoping they work...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobertFL View Post
    I have been having too many brim and shellcrackers swallowing the #6 truturn hooks deep. I was thinking I need something better than Hemostats. I just made these 3 hook degorgers from some old broken carbon arrows. I'm hoping they work...
    They should work fine. I bought mine on Amazon.

  10. #10
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    With the #8s I use it doesn’t happen often but it does happen. Had one this past weekend that took it in the area where the gills come together. He came back to the surface a while later but didn’t last long, osprey got him. Sickles also have smaller barbs which helps me get em out without damage. A disgorged can also be made from an old toothbrush.
    Listen to your gut over all the other voices.

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