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Thread: Still taking water in Jon boat

  1. #1
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    Default Still taking water in Jon boat

    I took the majority advice and had my boat professionally welded . The gent who did this is basically retired and only charged $30, the cost was less than expected. My issue is that it still leaks. I was on the water yesterday and in the estimated time of around 3 1/2 hours I had close to 6 inches of water around my feet in the stern area, no fun. I did the math and my boat has to be close to 39 years old and I`ve more than got my $$ out of it. However, I`d still prefer to repair as opposed to replace.

    I doubt the welder can help me...Would JB weld marine puttied over the welded area possibly seal my leak? Other options?

    Thanks!
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  2. #2
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    pound out the sunken area, then weld. Then put a plate over it and weld
    Likes Mbsbeek, "G", kycreek, skeetbum, SpeckledSlab LIKED above post

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    Not enough heat

  4. #4
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    I would either try to get it re-welded or possibly use a brazing rod

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    Find a different welder. That wasn't cleaned out enough before he welded it and was too cold of a weld from what I can see. J B Weld will cause you much more grief and money to fix it right. If you are fighting fatigue cracks you are fighting a losing battle. Brazing won't work on aluminum either as it isn't compatible.
    Likes "G", SpeckledSlab LIKED above post

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bassing_53 View Post
    pound out the sunken area, then weld. Then put a plate over it and weld
    What he said
    I have spent most my life fishing........the rest I wasted.
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  7. #7
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    Depends on the stresses you intend to put on that boat and how you plan to use it.
    I used the two part putty "JB Marine Weld" a while back to repair a piece broken out of my cavitation plate on my Mercury 115 2 Stroke, and the results have me completely blown away. Surface prep is key, as others said knock it out some, clean it well with a wire wheel, carefully mix and apply the JB Marine Weld squishing it into the injury, and smooth it out well before it sets up. Sand and do a second coat, if needed, again smooth it out before it dries.
    The JB Marine Weld, and NOT the fast drying version, is their strongest product at over 5,000 psi strength. Get the correct one, surface prep, mix 50/50 well, squish well into the injury, smooth well BEFORE it dries, second application if needed, let fully dry and cure for 24 hours, and check it out. You might even need to do a small gob on the inside, maybe.
    You are only out five bucks, do it right and prepare to be amazed.

  8. #8
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    I was told ...if you use a wire wheel to clean aluminum before welding, use a stainless steel one. I'm thinking So no ferrous/rusty metal embeds in the softer aluminum before welding??? Sorry you are still having issues. Welding thin aluminum is very hard I hear. I had some work done on a 1997 Sea Ark by a pro shop. The father did a awesome job on what I wanted...but the less experienced son did some "extra welding above the waterline for practice... I did not ask for that part to be worked on...
    .. He did not charge for the sons work or the holes he created.

  9. #9
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    Going out and finding a good welder and getting it done right is way cheaper than buying another boat.
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  10. #10
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    Before I had the 1997 20 ft SeaArk I had a 16 ft MonArk Square front Jon boat. I had a local guy who had good experience welding aluminum fix a bunch of places on it. The repairs went well due to his experience welding other boats. Maybe you can find a good boat welder by asking someone at the local bait store or Marina?

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