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Thread: Doing a little more

  1. #1
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    Default Doing a little more

    RecycledFish



    This is one of the many tips I get from this organization. I have seen some really good things from them.

    Stewardship Tip - Venting

    Tuesday, January 27th, 2009

    New regulations now require anglers, pursuing any species of reef fish in the Gulf of Mexico to possess and use a venting tool (the regulations also require the use of use non-stainless-steel circle hooks when fishing with natural baits and a dehooking device). Venting tools are sharpened, hollow instruments, similar to a 16 guage hypodermic needle with the plunger removed, that are used to deflate an over-expanded swim bladder of a fish.

    Many marine reef fish, including red grouper, black sea bass, and gag, have a gas-filled organ, called a swim bladder, which controls buoyancy and allows the fish to maintain a certain depth in the water column. The gas in the swim bladder can over-expand when a fish is brought quickly to the surface. An over-expanded swim bladder can rupture causing gasses to escape and continue to expand in the fish's body cavity.

    A venting tool should only be used if a fish has a bloated belly, bulging eyes, protrusion of the stomach from its mouth, or protrusion of intestines from the anus. A venting tool should not be used if a fish appears normal, not bloated, and appears able to swim down to habitat depth on its own.

    Deflation of a bloated fish is done by holding the fish, using wet hands, gently but firmly on its side. Insert the venting tool needle under a scale into the body cavity at a 45 angle in an area approximately 1 to 2 inches behind the base of the pectoral fin. Insert the needle just deep enough to release the trapped gas.

    Venting is not a complicated procedure. However, if you plan to fish in the Gulf, it is important to to be familiar with the procedure and be prepared to use it. The Florida Sea Grant's website provides more information regarding venting and other catch and release techniques.

    Why it is important to the fish: A fish that exhibits signs of barotrauma is less likely to swim back to a safe habitat depth. If the fish is released in this condition, the fish may float away and die from exposure to the elements or become an easy target for predators. By releasing the trapped gasses using a venting tool prior to releasing a fish, we help to reduce mortality.

    Venting is procedure that is part of our catch and release toolbox. When we use these tools, we increase the probability that a released fish will survive to fight another day.

    I love taking my kids fishing, now if I could just manage to fish at the same time.

  2. #2
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    I wonder if this could be used on crappie (on a smaller scale)? I would much rather vent a 6 incher that's doa!
    Last edited by FroggerZack; 01-27-2009 at 07:37 PM.


    PB Wht. Crappie 2.48 lbs 02-12-2011

  3. #3
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    Go to the website and ask them. They interact rather well, or have with me anyway.
    I love taking my kids fishing, now if I could just manage to fish at the same time.

  4. #4
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    Venting, fizzing, deflating, whatever it is called is a LONG way from being proven to save the fish's life (fresh or saltwater). We see the fish swimming off, goes down and we don't see them again. But who's to say they don't go all the way down, lay on the bottom and die because they can't keep air in their punctured bladder. Or, die from exaustion because they have to constantly swim because their bladder is punctured and can't get a bouyancy. Not to speak of the possible infections we introduce by sticking a needle in them or bleeding to death internally.

    I'm not an advocate for or against. This is just the other side of the story. And, I will be the first to admit there is no easy answer. And, sometime game laws are such that they harm more than the help. Guess that's the nature of politics. I'd really like to see more detailed, conclusive evidence on the effects of the procedure.
    Quit Wish'in and Let's Go Fish'in
    Darryl Morris

    FAMILY FISHING TRIPS GUIDE SERVICE
    501-844-5418 --- darryl@familyfishingtrips.com

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darryl Morris View Post
    Venting, fizzing, deflating, whatever it is called is a LONG way from being proven to save the fish's life (fresh or saltwater). We see the fish swimming off, goes down and we don't see them again. But who's to say they don't go all the way down, lay on the bottom and die because they can't keep air in their punctured bladder. Or, die from exaustion because they have to constantly swim because their bladder is punctured and can't get a bouyancy. Not to speak of the possible infections we introduce by sticking a needle in them or bleeding to death internally.

    I'm not an advocate for or against. This is just the other side of the story. And, I will be the first to admit there is no easy answer. And, sometime game laws are such that they harm more than the help. Guess that's the nature of politics. I'd really like to see more detailed, conclusive evidence on the effects of the procedure.

    Very well stated and i agree 100 percent.

  6. #6
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    Well the only reason I put that article there was because I couldn't find it on the site for those who might want it. The main reason was the site itself. They have a lot of things I never thought of and are so easy to do to do our part.

    As for venting being effective, according the local college it is significantly more effective than just letting them go. Especially for ling cod, black sea bass and halibut. If I catch a fish from deep down and I go to release it and it can't even get down a foot by itself because it looks like a balloon then I am gonna vent it if I can. If it dies, fine, but at least the seagulls and seals didn't get it before it had a chance. When something better comes along I will do that.
    I love taking my kids fishing, now if I could just manage to fish at the same time.

  7. #7
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    I agree with both points (if that's possible). Here at my own lake we have to keep the first 25 fish caught regardless of size during Dec-Feb so there is no problem w/ fish dieing after being pulled up from deep water. I have also been down fishing offshore in Louisiana for red snapper and get downstream from a commercial fisherman that is throwing undersized fish overboard at probably a rate 10 to 1 for every legal keeper. Man that steams me, what a waste!


    PB Wht. Crappie 2.48 lbs 02-12-2011

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