SLABSAUCE Crappie Attractant |
Likes Likes:  0
Thanks Thanks:  0
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: Motor Problems

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Pineville
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Motor Problems

    Look I have question for anyone who knows anything about motors,lol. I am tired of taking my boat to the boat shop for minor tune ups so I decided to try it myself. I am having trouble with my boat getting off to a fast start. I have changed the spark plugs, put fuel additive in the gas tank, and sprayed carberatur cleaner in the carberatur, and put a new fuel filter on. It almost seems like the motor is slipping.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,963
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Almost like it's SLIPPING. This is what I am going to key in on here

    Motor Slipping? That is what I am keying in on. Sounds like the prop is either caviting or slipping. If the prop won't turn with the shaft it's slipping. You can check the prop and make sure that it's tight on the prop shaft and that the nut is locked into postion with a key pin. Also check the blades of the prop for wear and tear. Worn or broken blades can cavitate. Cavitation occurs when low pressure on the back side of the blade while it's under the water creates air bubbles from the pressure drop. Water normally holds the air is solution but when the pressure on the dissolved air is decreased the air can form bubbles. Since props are designed to work in water not in air you can loose thrust when your prop is cavitating. Also it will make a lot of noise, well lots if you are a nuclear submarine trying to remain unheard. By going deeper the subs can get rid of the cavition as the water pressure increases as you go deeper.

    I would bet that its the nut on your prop that needs to be tightened a bit. Unless your motor still is using shear pins but most modern motors don't use them anymore from what I understand.

    Make sure that you have water running out fo the engines so that you know that the water pump is working. If you have not had the water pumps rubber impeller replaced in a few years you may want to have that checked as part of your routine maintainence. Also have the thermostat checked to make sure it's still in good shape ever few years.


    Quote Originally Posted by slabbuster
    Look I have question for anyone who knows anything about motors,lol. I am tired of taking my boat to the boat shop for minor tune ups so I decided to try it myself. I am having trouble with my boat getting off to a fast start. I have changed the spark plugs, put fuel additive in the gas tank, and sprayed carberatur cleaner in the carberatur, and put a new fuel filter on. It almost seems like the motor is slipping.
    Regards,

    Moose1am

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Rogersville, Alabama
    Posts
    338
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    If you think there is slippage, it may be your prop. A quick trip to the prop shop will show one way or the other.

    If you want to clean the carbs, the best way is to take them off, take all of the plastic and rubber off, take out the jets, and soak it in Berrymans Carb cleaner (the 2 or 3 gallon bucket with the dipping tray) for 2-3 hours. Rinse with water and let dry.

    Put in new plugs and reset the timing with freshly cleaned carbs. A timing light will be necessary.

    The best way to avoid having to clean the carbs is to disconnect the fuel line when you are putting the boat back on the trailer. After the boat is on the trailer, let the motor run till it cuts off due to lack of fuel, then try to crank it a couple of more times. This will insure that all of the fuel is out of the carbs.

  4. #4
    Barnacle Bill's Avatar
    Barnacle Bill is offline Super Mod and 2014 Crappie.com Man of the Year * Crappie.com Supporter
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Chesapeake, Va
    Posts
    17,535
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by slabbuster
    Look I have question for anyone who knows anything about motors,lol. I am tired of taking my boat to the boat shop for minor tune ups so I decided to try it myself. I am having trouble with my boat getting off to a fast start. I have changed the spark plugs, put fuel additive in the gas tank, and sprayed carberatur cleaner in the carberatur, and put a new fuel filter on. It almost seems like the motor is slipping.
    Need more info. What kind of motor is it? When you give it the gas, what does it do? Have you changed props recently? Does it idle smoothly? Have you added any weight to the boat? If you have a tach, what is you RPMs at WOT?
    Fair Winds and Following Seas

    Bill H. PTC USN Ret
    Chesapeake, Va


  5. #5
    papasage's Avatar
    papasage is offline Crappie.com 2011 Man of the Year & Moderator GA * Crappie.com Supporter
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Fitzgerald Ga. 31750
    Posts
    6,077
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    put a mark on the prop alinge with the hub run it and see if it mooved .
    spraying carb cleaner in the carb want do much . they usealey git clogged at the high speed jets . might need a rebuild . check this site for information.http://www.themarinedoctor.com/cgi-bin/YaBB.pl
    retired and now i will always fish

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,963
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Hey Sweet:

    I have always run the fuel out of my engine after unhooking the fuel line from the engine. That seemed to work as I never had any carb problems for many years. Only after about 20 years did I find that the carb needed to be rebuilt.

    But someone told me that unhooking the fuel line and running the engine until it stops would not remove all the fuel from inside the carb bowl?

    Does anyone know what the truth is? My experience tells me that it does not hurt the motor to run the fuel out and the store it like that all winter long. I do shoot some fogging oil into each spark plug hole for long term storage as that helps to protect the cylinders and pistons during the long cold winter months when the boat is stored outside under a canvas cover.


    Quote Originally Posted by SweetHomeAlabama
    If you think there is slippage, it may be your prop. A quick trip to the prop shop will show one way or the other.

    If you want to clean the carbs, the best way is to take them off, take all of the plastic and rubber off, take out the jets, and soak it in Berrymans Carb cleaner (the 2 or 3 gallon bucket with the dipping tray) for 2-3 hours. Rinse with water and let dry.

    Put in new plugs and reset the timing with freshly cleaned carbs. A timing light will be necessary.

    The best way to avoid having to clean the carbs is to disconnect the fuel line when you are putting the boat back on the trailer. After the boat is on the trailer, let the motor run till it cuts off due to lack of fuel, then try to crank it a couple of more times. This will insure that all of the fuel is out of the carbs.
    Regards,

    Moose1am

  7. #7
    Barnacle Bill's Avatar
    Barnacle Bill is offline Super Mod and 2014 Crappie.com Man of the Year * Crappie.com Supporter
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Chesapeake, Va
    Posts
    17,535
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Moose, you were told correctly. When you disconnect the fuel line and let it run until it quits, there is still some fuel in the carbs. However there is NO fuel in the cylinders and now have no protection. (lube). This can cause scoring of the cylinder walls over a period of time.
    Fair Winds and Following Seas

    Bill H. PTC USN Ret
    Chesapeake, Va


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Lawrence, Kansas
    Posts
    3,573
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Be careful running your engine without/out of water. You will ruin the impellers in the water pump. A can of 'Seafoam' gas stablizer is your best bet. Add it to your gas before you take it out fishin. You won't have to run it dry when done, in fact, it's better if you don't. A little preventive care will make your days longer on the water and not in the repair shop. Remember,,,, fuel at marina's just might be old, especially this time of the year. <*)}}}><
    You'll see the difference,,,on the end of your line! PROUD MEMBER OF ​TEAM GEEZER

  9. #9
    Barnacle Bill's Avatar
    Barnacle Bill is offline Super Mod and 2014 Crappie.com Man of the Year * Crappie.com Supporter
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Chesapeake, Va
    Posts
    17,535
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    That Seafoam is some fantastic stuff. It helps keep carbon out and also is a fuel stabalizer. I've seen some old engines brought back to life doing a decarb with it.
    Fair Winds and Following Seas

    Bill H. PTC USN Ret
    Chesapeake, Va


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Alexandria, KY
    Posts
    1,084
    Post Thanks / Like

    Lightbulb Be aware!

    Quote Originally Posted by Moose1am
    Hey Sweet:

    I have always run the fuel out of my engine after unhooking the fuel line from the engine. That seemed to work as I never had any carb problems for many years. Only after about 20 years did I find that the carb needed to be rebuilt.

    But someone told me that unhooking the fuel line and running the engine until it stops would not remove all the fuel from inside the carb bowl?

    Does anyone know what the truth is? My experience tells me that it does not hurt the motor to run the fuel out and the store it like that all winter long. I do shoot some fogging oil into each spark plug hole for long term storage as that helps to protect the cylinders and pistons during the long cold winter months when the boat is stored outside under a canvas cover.
    Be aware if you run the gas out of the carbs you could score the pistons. Especially if you have more than 1 carburator. What happens is the top carb may run out of gas first before the bottom carbs, or vice versa, the engine still runs but there is no gas/oil getting into the cylinders. My dad used to do this until his Merc 50 started making some grinding noises, caused from him pulling the gas line off and letting the engine run until there was no gas in the carbs. This is what the mechanic said. So be aware of the problems you could encounter with multi carbs on your outboard.
    Bassky

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

BACK TO TOP