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Thread: How to fish a light jig in deep water?

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    Default How to fish a light jig in deep water?


    Iím new to crappie fishing and have read books all winter trying to learn. It seems that most people agree that the lighter the jig, the better especially early spring when the water is still cold. 1/16 seems to be the most popular and even 1/32 oz.

    The problem Iím having is that I think Iíve found some crappie in around 20 feet of water but how do you get a jig that light down to them? When I cast out, my line is always slack when the jig is dropping and it seems like I could be missing hits when the jig is falling. I thought about adding a split shot above the jig but wouldnít that defeat the purpose of using a small jig?

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    I do put a weight about 6 to 8 inches above the lure seems to work for me or put on two small jigs one above the other. Good Luck!

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    Fish slowly...it will help keep the jig at depth.

    Jim

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    Fish slow ! They will hit it on the fall.

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    From what I have read, A lot of folks will use a heavier jig when fishing deeper water, going to a 1/8th oz 3/16 oz to get the jig down. If your concerned about the larger hook size that normally comes on these jigs, you can order them with smaller hooks from most any of the jig pourers here on Crappie.Com. You can also do as keeferfish suggested and fish a double jig rig.
    Now you say your casting out. I am guessing here that you're casting beyond where the target fish are, you can do a couple things here, one you should be doing anyway, that being watch your line as it's consumed by the water. If a crappie hits it as it rises to it, your line will take a momentary pause, at which time you need to be ready to set the hook.
    The other method is cast beyond your targeted fish, as soon as the jig hits the water, flip your bail closed, and hook your finger around the line. Keep your line snug and let your jig pendulum into the strike zone. By keeping your finger on the line, you can feel the bite, provided the line is snug as it falls. Good luck on your endeavor.
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    Quote Originally Posted by xpauliber View Post
    Iím new to crappie fishing and have read books all winter trying to learn. It seems that most people agree that the lighter the jig, the better especially early spring when the water is still cold. 1/16 seems to be the most popular and even 1/32 oz.

    The problem Iím having is that I think Iíve found some crappie in around 20 feet of water but how do you get a jig that light down to them? When I cast out, my line is always slack when the jig is dropping and it seems like I could be missing hits when the jig is falling. I thought about adding a split shot above the jig but wouldnít that defeat the purpose of using a small jig?

    I do this on a regular basis and catch a lot of fish. I only use 2# test line...I mean true 2# test line....most US market lines break way over the stated rating and are much larger diameter. The key to using light jigs....and many times I will use a 1/64 ounce in 25 feet of water...is to use a sinking line. I use Varivas Ester line and Varivas Blue Moon fluorocarbon line. Trying to keep a micro jig down deep in 25 feet of water using nylon line is almost impossible. Of course you can go up to a larger size jig head but then you take away from what you are trying to do. I use a Trout Magnet almost exclusively in my fishing. Using anything larger than a 2 gram jig head...equal to 1/14 ounce....and you take away the action of the jig. Several years back my son joined me for one of my trips below Nickajack Dam. We were fishing in 24 feet of water...using same jig head and same lure. I was using ester line....which sinks...and he was using a nylon line. I felt bad for him...I think he caught one fish that day. I was catching on almost every cast. The fish were all on the bottom. He went all the way up to a 1/8 ounce jig head but still caught no fish. I gave him a spool of the ester line. He kept telling me that he did not believe that the line made the difference. We went to back to same spot a few days later. This time we both wore the fish out. He now keeps a reel spooled up with the ester and FC line for when he wants to fish deep water. Check out this video of me catching crappie in 14-23 feet of water.

    Regards

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    I use a 14ft jig pole for starters with a #4 BPS Clamshot 4ft above a 1/32 jig fishing deep. You still have to go down slow so the clamshot doesn't pass up the jig on the way down. I feel a snag I let the clamshot down rather fast and it un-snags my jig. The longer pole makes the long rigging more manageable.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rojoguio View Post
    I use a 14ft jig pole for starters with a #4 BPS Clamshot 4ft above a 1/32 jig fishing deep. You still have to go down slow so the clamshot doesn't pass up the jig on the way down. I feel a snag I let the clamshot down rather fast and it un-snags my jig. The longer pole makes the long rigging more manageable.
    As SK shows in his videos with the long poles, ease the jig down following it down with the pole tip. This also allows you to know if you get a bite higher in the water column before getting to the depth of you targeted fish. Forks great single pole jigging for sure.
    Proud to have served with and supported the Units I was in: 1st IDF, 9th INF, 558th USAAG (Greece), 7th Transportation Brigade, 6th MEDSOM (Korea), III Corp, 8th IDF, 3rd Armor Div.
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    Quote Originally Posted by xpauliber View Post
    I’m new to crappie fishing and have read books all winter trying to learn. It seems that most people agree that the lighter the jig, the better especially early spring when the water is still cold. 1/16 seems to be the most popular and even 1/32 oz.

    The problem I’m having is that I think I’ve found some crappie in around 20 feet of water but how do you get a jig that light down to them? When I cast out, my line is always slack when the jig is dropping and it seems like I could be missing hits when the jig is falling. I thought about adding a split shot above the jig but wouldn’t that defeat the purpose of using a small jig?

    I should have asked you...how are you fishing? Vertical jigging or cast and retrieve?


    Regards

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    I’ve tried both ways and wasn’t successful either way. Is one way typically better than the other? Most times I’m using sidescan to locate cribs or brush in deep water and trying to vertically jig most times though.

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