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Thread: Letís talk nymphing.

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by binfordw View Post
    I don't understand that logic



    But yea, the 9-10'ers in 2,3wt's are not a real common occurrence with the cheaper rods it seems.


    I would think a 10' would help- but not be a game changing difference. Drifting a little closer to where your standing, or holding your arm way up should get similar results I'd think.


    I'll be in the same boat I'm sure, using a 8'6" here. Hoping to find out soon, been building up my nymph collection until we can plan a few days to head back to WV.

    On a side note, I bought a bunch of materials from lively legs after watching those vids on nymphing. The little rubber legs are awesome, makes tying sweet looking nymphs easy, and they don't feel as delicate as all the other stuff I've tied.
    The 10' and 11' rods are the KEYS to these techniques.

    They allow you manage more line of the water at distance. This gives you more natural drifts when navigating complex currents.

    They allow you to fish much lighter tippett because they become long shock absorbers. The lighter tippett lets you fish lighter flies and steamers so they drift more naturally and deeper.

    The long rods are a game changer.

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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by deathb4disco View Post
    I'm not much of a trout guy, but I've done enough to know strike detection can be tough. A lot of the "Euro nymphing" guys use "sighters" (bright-colored mono with many tiny coils that look like a spring.) I think the George Daniels book that 8fishermen mentioned would be a good investment to learn the very latest methods. At least you have a mentor.
    GD's book is excellent.

    Also check out Devin Olsen's site Modern Nymphing. His videos are $20 each and are a must have. The first one is the basics, modern nymphing. The second one, modern nymphing elevated, is fantastic. The video work in both are professionally done. All fishing in them is done on public waters. He and Lance Egan are both team USA competitors and fish against the best in the world.

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  3. #23
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    I'll start another thread so I don't completely hijack this one. I actually came here to see if anyone else was using this to crappie fish.

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  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by deathb4disco View Post
    Have you seen the Cortland Competition Rod? It’s more expensive than the Orvis, but I understand it’s very popular with the competition fly guys.

    Cortland Competition Rod - European Style Nymphing ‚Äď Cortland Line North America

    The cortland rod is excellent. I have a 10' 6" 3 wt. It is my favorite rod to fish. I have landed many 5 to 10 lb warm water fish on it in current.

    Most of the nymph rods I am familiar with have heavier butt sections. I've heard them described as a 3 wt tip for protecting light tippett and casting weighted nymphs with a 5 wt butt section for fighting larger fish.

    The longer rods will also somewhat load under their own weight when using momo only out of the tip and casting lightly weighed nymphs.

    These days, I find myself gravitating toward longer, lighter rods. I am about to order an 11' 3 wt from Reddington. I broke a 9' 5 wt that is now discontinued. They sent me a 50% discount code for a new rod since they couldn't fix mine and it was totally my fault. I thought that was good of them.

    Sent from my SM-J337R7 using Crappie.com Fishing mobile app





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  5. #25
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    I forgot that I started this thread! Lots of good info. Consider this: The Mono Rig and Why Fly Line Sucks | Troutbitten



    I can do all things through Christ, who strengthens me.

  6. #26
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    I generally (although I haven't trout fished in a few years) watch the end of my fly line. I usually see movement there, or often catch the flash of a strike in my peripheral vision. Obviously I have no idea about how many I don't detect, but I've never had problems catching quite a few fish that way. I don't want to use a strike indicator for that kind of fishing, but if you are not opposed to it I'm sure it makes the job a lot easier, both in knowing when you have drag on the nymph and in detecting the strike. I've seen some people on the Little Red River clean up using a strike indicator over a sow bug nymph - basically catching one on every cast in certain holes. Personally, using a nymph is a last resort for me. I much prefer dry flies, emergers, and streamers.

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