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Thread: Battery for 12V 54lb motorguide trolling motor

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    Dayton
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    Always good to have a reserve battery or a back up. I took a plastic bass buggy to the back of a lake. I wasn't thinking that the wind was hitting me in the back and I zipped along to the back end about 2 miles from the launch. On the way back the wind was giving the trolling motor a workout. Battery was done about half way back. Bass buggies don't paddle very well at all especially into a head wind
    :I would like to thank the builders of docks for giving me a place to fish and lose tackle

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Lexington, South Carolina, United States
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    The circuit breaker is placed at the positive post at the battery. It is there to protect the WIRING not the motor.
    In case of a short in the motor it trips to prevent the wiring from melting and/or catching fire. Always a good idea.
    In the case of a minor fault it would possibly trip and might preserve the motor but 95% of the time it's there to protect the wiring.
    Mark 1:17 ...I will make you fishers of men
    Weldcraft Stick Steer, 50 Tohatsu, IPilot
    Likes zig zag, Baitwaster LIKED above post

  3. #13
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    Apr 2019
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    Little River, SC
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    I use an older model Motorguide foot control 54lb. I bought my 25 series battery from Wal-Mart and it works very well for cranking and fishing. I do run a circuit breaker and use it as a off/on switch when not on the water. I keep it on a Battery Tender all year, however I do check the distilled water level every quarter..

  4. #14
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    Feb 2020
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    Grandview, Mo.
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeaRay View Post
    The circuit breaker is placed at the positive post at the battery. It is there to protect the WIRING not the motor.
    In case of a short in the motor it trips to prevent the wiring from melting and/or catching fire. Always a good idea.
    In the case of a minor fault it would possibly trip and might preserve the motor but 95% of the time it's there to protect the wiring.
    Absolutely correct! I would like to add: No one cares about the wiring itself, its that when it melts down, the insulation throughout the length of wire melts away, the wire then cuts through any plastics, other wires etc and other wires melt down and plastics burn. Metal arc's, even stranded copper wire can weld to aluminum etc. Oh, and then batteries can explode. This is my industry, I've seen it. If you don't get a $15 breaker online at least use fuses. (but make sure you have spares in the boat).

    Also I would consider running 2 smaller batteries (in parallel) over one super heavy and huge group 31. A group 24 is going to be around 80ah and two would give you 160ah(ish). They can be spread out to distribute weight, and way easier to carry. Also two in parallel will help to prevent over discharging the battery and a more consistent run time throughout the day. Always charge back up as soon as possible. On board chargers are convenient, not better or worse (they're mostly just water resistant). Also 2 batteries in parallel can be recharged with a single bank charger. You want a good charger&maintainer that's 3+ amps (6-8 amps ideal). An 800ma tender is not good for charging, only maintaining. 800ma is .8 amps, anything 1.5amps and below is a trickle charger and basically for maintaining already full batteries.
    A "good" charger works in phases, runs at high output until battery reaches something like 80% then powers down until about 95% then trickle charges and maintains to 100%. I think all the on board chargers do this but cost way to much, I put quick connects on my charger and keep it dry. Some day I'll splurge.

    Parallel means you use an adequately gauged wire and connect positive from batt A to positive on batt B (and subsequent batteries if you go crazy), then connect the negative on batt A to negative on batt B. Connect your TM or devices to the pos/neg on either battery like normal.

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