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Thread: Jig Weights?

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    Default Jig Weights?

    What weights do you most commonly use for flipping slip bobbers, jigs with a minnow?

    I know the bobber design and buoyancy is a key factor, but what jig weights do I need to have?

    Typically I throw a Thill pencil-type slip float, and know that my presentation has to barely be buoyant.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Centerliner View Post
    I know the bobber design and buoyancy is a key factor, but what jig weights do I need to have?
    It really depends on the size of the float. If you want to get really precise, get a bucket of water, and test the floats with different jig weights.

    Having said that, I would lose the minnow and the float and just throw the jig.
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    I have found thill makes a 1/16 th oz float that rides on a black center line. Flouro pink top, flouro yellow bottom. If I see, with my bad eyes, yellow , I know they have it and are lifting it. I really need glasses, but this float has prolonged getting them. Lol
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    - Oh absolutely. Outstanding advice DB4D! I couldn't agree more, I love to fish this way.

    Big drawback is in brush or underwater trees, the minnow is too free to seek cover on a bare hook. They can swim too easily to cover.

    Now, I have heard of a technique to use in these situations where you form a brass(?) welding rod of a couple feet long and tie your main line to it. Then a short leader off of its bottom with your hook. You can make it so you just snap a pre-snelled hook to it for simplicity. The brass won't corrode. i had forgotten about it, I need to make one. An old timer told me about it many years ago.

    Back to it, what are the common jig weights used on 4,6,8 # line for this?

    - ICUR12, thanks I'll look into that float.

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    I would use the smallest jig possible.

    More tomorrow.
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    Just my opinion but I feel the 1/16 is going to be best for your application. I'm like D4D, I test my floats in sink with short piece of line and jig to find ones that sit the way I like them. And 1/16 has just enough weight to kinda hold minnow in place yet still move around some without tangling a lot. That brass rod trick would work same way, just get some peices and trim till the float you prefer sits just right. Might not cast that great but pitching short distance should work great.
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    Quote Originally Posted by deathb4disco View Post
    I would use the smallest jig possible.

    More tomorrow.
    I just think that the smallest possible jig will cast better.

    I guess nobody flies kites anymore, but think of the float as a kite and the line/jig below the float as the tail of the kite. A kite won't fly well with a heavy or bulky tail. A float is the same. So, I would pick a float and test to see how much weight it will support. Let's say it will support 1/4 oz. Then, I would put most of the weight near the float and let a small jig be the final bit of weight to balance it just the way you like it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Centerliner View Post
    What weights do you most commonly use for flipping slip bobbers, jigs with a minnow?

    I know the bobber design and buoyancy is a key factor, but what jig weights do I need to have?

    Typically I throw a Thill pencil-type slip float, and know that my presentation has to barely be buoyant.
    A (Weighted) 5/8" Thill Pro Series Slip Float will perfectly support a 1/32 oz jig.
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    Thanks Techno, that's specific, directly useful information.

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    I personally use a 1/2" Thill slip bobber with a 1/32 oz. jig head. Split shot 12" above the jig head to set the buoyancy. Everyone has their favorite set up. I like reading about how others do it.
    Kevin
    in Yorktown
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