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sixfin
03-31-2009, 01:42 PM
Here are some pictures of a stake out of a fishing buddy's stake bed. This stake was put in 15 years ago. It was nailed to a pallet. I know this should probably be in the Structure Forum but I figured everyone would want to see how long their stuff may last. This bed was in 7 to 8 feet of water. The stake is an 1 1/2 inch Ash dowel. We used to get these from a local sawmill that used them as blanks for ax and shovel handles. Notice how the bottom part that was submerged in the mud looks just like it did the day it was put in. We cut one end to see what condition the center of the wood stake was in. It is still hard as a rock. I'm thinking of sealing it with clear epoxy or polyurethane. It would make a really neat walking stick.

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s42/redcrow40/stake1.jpg

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s42/redcrow40/stake2.jpg

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s42/redcrow40/stake3.jpg

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s42/redcrow40/stake4.jpg

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s42/redcrow40/stake5.jpg

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s42/redcrow40/stake6.jpg

father of 4
03-31-2009, 02:21 PM
I recommend tongue oil. It will hold up better on a walking stick and MAN that would make a pretty one too.

Cane Pole
03-31-2009, 02:24 PM
Ash=good ball bat. Add as few steroids and walla.

What lake?

fish_4_all
03-31-2009, 02:34 PM
That will a beauty of a walking stick.

PawPaw "gene"
03-31-2009, 02:48 PM
You just can not beat mother nature's artwork. You couldn't duplicate it if you wanted, unless you've got 15 years to sit around and wait. Great find, I want one.

"gene"

Fatman
03-31-2009, 02:51 PM
Man if that was 15 years that stakebed would have been good liek forever LOL.

Fatman

jaxsprat
03-31-2009, 04:21 PM
Maybe U otta pull that one up as U could probably make enough off that one selling us walking sticks to make 20 more crappie structures, sure is great art work...

Scott38305
03-31-2009, 04:58 PM
I've read somewhere that some folks are pulling some big logs from the bottom of the Tennessee River that have been down there in the mud for like 30 to 40 years.
Are they marketable?

I don't know if it's true but after seeing how that stake is preserved it sounds plausible.

skeeter
03-31-2009, 05:37 PM
Makes me wonder why peir posts rot out so quick! my dad has replaced the 4x4s about every 5 years due to rotting

smashdn
03-31-2009, 06:46 PM
I've read somewhere that some folks are pulling some big logs from the bottom of the Tennessee River that have been down there in the mud for like 30 to 40 years.
Are they marketable?

I don't know if it's true but after seeing how that stake is preserved it sounds plausible.

Timeless Timber - History (http://www.timelesstimber.com/about/index.php?content=history)

I ain't got the money to pay for it.

scoremaster
03-31-2009, 07:08 PM
most of the reason the wood preserves so well is that the air and water are not takeing turns at battering it and after in the water a short time it will cover with moss and such which further seals out tree demons .

i read that somewhere just can't rem. where .

Scott

sixfin
03-31-2009, 07:41 PM
Same reason they find buried wooden ships under water that are hundreds of years old. Once buried, they're sealed in time.

skeetbum
03-31-2009, 08:15 PM
There are logs taken from the Great lakes that have been there for a hundred years or more. These are veneer grade logs in today's market, and some foriegn companies are paying 40,000 a log for them. The cold water has preserved them and the size of the logs hasn't been seen in the timber market for years. Bamboo makes a good structure but I think the hardwoods go the distance.

alabass
03-31-2009, 08:48 PM
Anyone that's ever fished the flats on Wheeler when the water is down has seen the thousands of stumps out there. Those stumps are hard as rock and that timber was cut somewhere around 80 yrs. ago before the lake was backed up.