PDA

View Full Version : Dear Guest......



VietVet68
05-24-2005, 09:41 AM
http://home.ma.rr.com/thereadingers/dearguest.jpg

VietVet68
05-24-2005, 11:33 AM
After looking at this graphic from different points of view, especially from the point of view of a guest, I came to the conclusion that some might take it as being pushy or possibly even arrogant. Let me promise you that was certainly not my intent.

Here was my frame of mind when I created it.....

Anyone that l´oks at the "Who's Online" will on many occassions see that Guest out number the members 2:1 and many times 3:1 or 4:1.
I stopped and thought, Geez, All those guest probably hold a ton of information, about not only Crappie fishing but many other things that coincide with fishing in general.

I also know that I am fairly new on this board, and I was probably a Guest for two or three weeks before I decided to register. What happened to me, I'm sure has also happened to some of you.
I'd be surfing the post and see a place where I would have asked a question or suggested something from my experiences.......if I was just registered. Nahhhh.....not worth the trouble of registering for one or two items....then it becomes three or four items......then.....yuhhh gotta do'it!

I and I am quite sure all the members would encourage you to register, even if you feel you will never post......but I'll bet two dozen dead Crappie Minnows that once you are registered you will pull the trigger;)

TAZ
05-24-2005, 11:48 AM
Could be Vet that we are registered but only practicing our TROLLING! I sometimes come( No always ) to the site to see whats been posted and only log in if I have something to add. Pretty neet site too! Thanks

VietVet68
05-24-2005, 11:59 AM
Could be Vet that we are registered but only practicing our TROLLING! I sometimes come( No always ) to the site to see whats been posted and only log in if I have something to add. Pretty neet site too! Thanks
Holy Crappy Poop, Taz......I never considered that many of the "Guest" could be registered lurkers! LOL

whizkids
05-24-2005, 12:21 PM
Holy Crappy Poop, Taz......I never considered that many of the "Guest" could be registered lurkers! LOL---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Under user profile there is an option that will allow members to browse anonymously. :confused:

shadow
05-24-2005, 12:43 PM
Hey V.Vet, I don't see you as being pushy or arrogant or even prejudice. I noticed the picture had both "black" and "white" crappie in it! LOL!

CrappieLips
05-24-2005, 12:53 PM
Sounded good to me vet;; like shadow said you got a black & white crappie posted And a great big Hook that could be costruded as; Once you register and get on an post your HOOKED>>>>>>>>>>>.So Welcome All you non-members come on in the water's fine

Barnacle Bill
05-24-2005, 01:40 PM
Very well put vet!

CrappiePappy
05-24-2005, 03:02 PM
I know it's phonetically correct, maybe even ebonically correct, but "meaning" wise ........... Crappy means "bad" - Crappie means "good" ;) You may want to change the spelling of the word describing our "family". We may be a little disfunctional, at times, but most of the time we mean no harm :D ............. cp :cool:

VietVet68
05-24-2005, 03:25 PM
I know it's phonetically correct, maybe even ebonically correct, but "meaning" wise ........... Crappy means "bad" - Crappie means "good" ;) You may want to change the spelling of the word describing our "family". We may be a little disfunctional, at times, but most of the time we mean no harm :D ............. cp :cool:
LOL....yep u r correct, I sort of did it as a play on words, I'll get my paint remover out here in a little bit and correct it.

VietVet68
05-24-2005, 03:32 PM
I know it's phonetically correct, maybe even ebonically correct, but "meaning" wise ........... Crappy means "bad" - Crappie means "good" ;) You may want to change the spelling of the word describing our "family". We may be a little disfunctional, at times, but most of the time we mean no harm :D ............. cp :cool: Check it now......couldn't find my paint remover :)

now...er...uhhh.....could you please splaine me "ebonically"?

Got my diction'ry shimm'in up my rock'un chair....

DmDuck
05-24-2005, 04:33 PM
Crappy y'all ain't .... Y'all is however NUTS !!!!!!

Mike Sutton
05-24-2005, 04:41 PM
How do you tell who's online?
I agree on joining in. I've only been posting for about a month and I'm hooked. I check the forum everyday now.

Sincerely,
Mike

VietVet68
05-24-2005, 05:01 PM
How do you tell who's online?
I agree on joining in. I've only been posting for about a month and I'm hooked. I check the forum everyday now.

Sincerely,
Mike Mike, go to the top of any page and on the menu bar you will see "Quick Links", when you click on it a roll-down window will appear with the bottom choice being "Who's Online".

Moose1am
05-24-2005, 08:29 PM
LOL I resemble that remark




Crappy y'all ain't .... Y'all is however NUTS !!!!!!

CrappiePappy
05-25-2005, 09:57 AM
What is Ebonics?


Ebonics is a recent term for an American variety of English otherwise called Black Vernacular English, African American English, American Black English, African American Vernacular English, and other similar names. Implicit in all these names is the recognition of the English spoken by American blacks as a distinct variety, and the term Ebonics came into use about the time of a controversial decision by the school board of Oakland in California to declare the black vernacular a second language.


African American Vernacular English, or AAVE, is the term used by scholars for the widespread and varied African American usages of the English Language, also called Ebonics, Afro-American English, American Black English, Black English, Black English Vernacular, and Black Vernacular English. Originating in the pidgin of the slave trade and Plantation Creole in the U.S. Southern states, African American Vernacular English considerably influenced U.S. Southern English and, in the late 19th and the 20th centuries, spread by migration through much of the nation. It therefore has both rural and urban components. It has also come to be associated with the language of blues, jazz, and rap music.

As with African English, African American Vernacular English is “non-rhotic” or r-dropping: r is not pronounced in words such as art, door, and worker. Its other characteristics - some going back to similar features of African languages - are these: (1) the use of d and t instead of th, as in dem for them and tree for three; 2. l-dropping, as in hep for help, sef for self, and too for tool; (3) consonant reduction at the ends of some words (including tense endings), as in wha for what, jus for just, and pas for past; (4) use of -in for -ing, as in runnin for running; (5) multiple negatives, as in no way nobody can do it; (6) verb aspects marked for intermittent, momentary, or continuous action rather than tense per se, the tense time being apparent from the contexts, as in he be laughin for he is always laughing and he run for he runs; and (7) dropping of the verb to be in some constructions, as in she sick and he gone for she is sick and he has gone.

African American Vernacular English expressions have contributed to the rich texture of American English, these terms being typical: yam (sweet potato), goober (peanut), okra, gumbo (the soup and the river mud), tote (carry), juke, mumbo jumbo, hep/hip, and boogie woogie. All these are rooted in African languages. In its more urban settings, African American Vernacular English’s contributions are also many, these few examples making the point: dis (to disrespect), igg (to ignore), chill out (to stop behaving stupidly), ’tude (attitude), the Man (the police), hang-up (a problem), rap (to talk), make it (succeed), kicks (pleasure), and the sense of bad meaning variously “good,” “extraordinary,” and “beautiful.”

........nuff said ? ........LOL!! .............cp :cool:

VietVet68
05-25-2005, 10:06 AM
What is Ebonics?


Ebonics is a recent term for an American variety of ....

........nuff said ? ........LOL!! .............cp :cool:
Very interesting and I thank you.

By de way, are you related to Moose?;)

whizkids
05-25-2005, 11:32 AM
So ebonics is sort of like the modern form of pig latin.Only applied to certain ethnic subgroup who won't learn , can't learn , or refuse to speak like the majority of citizens in a geographical area.
For those who don't know:
Pig Latin is a language game (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Language_game) primarily used in English (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_language), although the rules can be easily modified to apply to most any language. Pig Latin is usually used by children (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child), who will often use it to converse in (perceived) privacy from adults (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adult), or simply for amusement, although sometimes adults will use it around very young children to discuss topics they don't want the child to hear. The impact of Pig Latin on the English language proper is minimal, although certain Pig Latin translations (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Translation), most notably ixnay (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ixnay) and amscray (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/amscray), have been incorporated into English slang (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slang). The British name for Pig Latin is backslang (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backslang). Pig Latin is also used by tourists in foreign countries where its inhabitants have an appreciation for the English language (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_language) and one wishes that the general public are not privy to the conversation, for example, when dealing with Balinese (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bali) street vendors.

The rules are roughly:


For words that begin with consonant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consonant) sounds, move all the consonant sounds to the end of the word and add "ay." Thus,ball becomes "all-bay"; button becomes "utton-bay"; star becomes "ar-stay"; three becomes "ee-thray"; question becomes "estion-quay"
For words that begin with vowel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vowel) sounds, simply add a syllable ending in "ay" to the end of the word. Variation of this rule make for many of the "dialects" of Pig Latin. The various syllables that are added after vowel-initial words are "way", "yay", "hay", and just plain "ay". Thus, a becomes "a-way", "a-yay", "a-hay", or "a-ay", depending on the dialect. Similarly, honest becomes "honest-way" etc. because even though it begins with the consonant letter h, the word begins with a vowel sound.
A Pig Latin example text follows:

Is-thay is-way an-way example-way of-way Ig-pay Atin-lay. As-way ou-yay an-cay ee-say, its-way illy-say, ut-bay ots-lay of-way un-fay or-fay ildren-chay. Actually this is a common misconception when using Pig Latin. The correct form is to rearrange ONLY the first letter, no matter what the word, and add the -ay suffix; however in some words it causes the word to sound wrong and/or be difficult to say, which is one reason why the misconception came about in the first place. The other 'dialects' of Pig were made to counter the difficulty of saying words rearranging the first letter only, and are now acceptable in common use; but originally Pig Latin consisted only of rearranging the first letter to the end, not syllable.

It should be noted that there is no "standard" for Pig Latin, although the principle of moving the initial consonants to the end of a word and adding "ay" is universal. Like most languages, there are many different forms, or "dialects (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dialects)" of Pig Latin. These tend to be semi-geographical in usage, as one would expect for any spoken language, although this is particularly true for Pig Latin because Pig Latin is rarely used in mass media (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_media). Different language games often have their own names, but are sometimes referred to as "Pig Latin" as a general descriptive. The widest dialectical variation in Pig Latin is in the treatment of vowel-initial words, as described in rule 2. However, some dialects have an alternate version of rule 1: move only the first consonant to the end of the word, retaining any other consonants in the initial consonant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consonant) cluster at the beginning of the word. Using this rule, street becomes "treet-say" and truck becomes "ruck-tay". Another alternation of this rule is to move the non-sonorant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonorant) portion of the initial consonant cluster, leaving behind "l" or "r". Thus, street becomes "reet-stay" rather than "eet-stray" or "treet-say". The variations in rule 1 are relatively rare, while the variations in rule 2 are widespread.

Pig Latin is not one to one (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_to_one); that is, there exist pairs of words in English such that they have the same "translation" into Pig Latin. For instance, with the "way" variation of rule 2, itch and witch both become "itch-way".

Language games, including Pig Latin, are sometimes the subject of serious academic research by linguists (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linguists). The study of language games like Pig Latin can reveal information about how people internally represent phonetic information like syllable structure that is not easily discovered using other methods of language study.

This must be why I have difficulty understanding what anyone is saying between the ages 12 and 19.:D

CrappiePappy
05-25-2005, 11:48 AM
NAW, man! ...... I got all that definition stuff from my "Encarta Dictionary" program ...LOL!!

Da Moose is da boss, when it comes to volume info posts :D !! ....cp :cool:

VietVet68
05-25-2005, 11:54 AM
NAW, man! ...... I got all that definition stuff from my "Encarta Dictionary" program ...LOL!!

Da Moose is da boss, when it comes to volume info posts :D !! ....cp :cool:
Moosebonics!