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Rookie1
04-11-2005, 08:27 AM
I've been fishing a little neighborhood pond whenver I can't get to the lake and need to scratch the fishin' itch a little. I've noticed that I mostly am seeing black crappie up in the shallows 1' deep and can catch them with a jig dancing in front of their face long enough to piss 'em off to make 'em hit it. It seems the white crappie and the overall larger crappie are out deeper, say twenty further off the bank and a little harder to catch. The question is, do black and white crappie spawn together or not, do the bigger fish hang deep and wait for the little ones to get done first. I find this interesting and i would apprecaite any info. The more knowledge I have about crappie behaviors, of course the more advantages you have to catch them. Oh, and by the way, it is fun to drive 2 minutes and catch a hundred in an hour and a half. Haven't found a lake I can do that on yet. Anyway, any help appreciated. tight lines and God Bless

Rookie

GABoy
04-11-2005, 08:38 AM
I do not know the differences in spawning patterns of white vs. black...but, actually the larger crappie usually spawn first....so it MIGHT be that the white crappie being the larger ones may have already spawned and moved back into the deeper water....usually after they spawn they are not as aggressive....

So, in my opinion...it might be that the larger white crappie have already spawn and went back deeper where they will not be as aggressive...

But, that is just my opinion.

Have you caught any of the white crappie and noted if they still have eggs or not?

CrappieLips
04-11-2005, 08:45 AM
I've been fishing a little neighborhood pond whenver I can't get to the lake and need to scratch the fishin' itch a little. I've noticed that I mostly am seeing black crappie up in the shallows 1' deep and can catch them with a jig dancing in front of their face long enough to piss 'em off to make 'em hit it. It seems the white crappie and the overall larger crappie are out deeper, say twenty further off the bank and a little harder to catch. The question is, do black and white crappie spawn together or not, do the bigger fish hang deep and wait for the little ones to get done first. I find this interesting and i would apprecaite any info. The more knowledge I have about crappie behaviors, of course the more advantages you have to catch them. Oh, and by the way, it is fun to drive 2 minutes and catch a hundred in an hour and a half. Haven't found a lake I can do that on yet. Anyway, any help appreciated. tight lines and God Bless

Rookie
Rookie::: In my experince in fishing, Most Not all of the black crappie are males, Whats probally happening the males are cleaning the beds getting ready for thoses females out there in that deeper water to come in and spawn. are the males butt's and tails redish, if so there cleaning the beds. I'd keep a check on that temp it want be long. where you fishin?LOL. Also i keep a check on the males and females when i clean them

england
04-11-2005, 09:04 AM
Rookie1
Black crappie generally hang a bit more shallower than do white crappie. I've caught black and white crappie spawning in the same area. Black crappie like clearer water where as the whites prefer the more stained water. The largest crappie in the lake spawn first followed by the smaller ones as the season goes on. say for instance you are catching male white crappie in 18 inches of water ( you can tell the male white crappie is in spawning mode by the color of his belly.The belly turns from white to black when he is trying to attract a female. ) the females will be just outside the beds in mabey a foot or two deeper water waiting on just the right conditions to move into the beds and spawn.
Here is an example. The other day I was catching big males in a bush in one foot of water. I caught nine males out of this one bush.( this was a pretty large bush) After I caught the males I started fishing the deep side of the bush outside of it and caught six monster females just sitting out there waiting. That was fifteen fish in and around one bush. YEEEHAAA thats fun. You need to be wading or fishing from the bank to do this. Trolling motors spook them when you try to get close in a boat.
Anyway I hope this helps

GABoy
04-11-2005, 09:37 AM
I was just re-reading....and when you say white crappie vs. black crappie are you talking about the species....because even though a crappie may look like it is white compared to another, it could still truly be a "black" crappie.....male crappie tend to turn almost black during the spawning time.....and the females do not, however, this does not mean that the females are necessarily white crappie.....they could still be the species of "black" crappie....maybe the following will help explain better.

"White" crappie have vertical bars on their side whereas "Black" crappie have more of a sporadic or speckled look.. Let me see if I can get the pictures inserted so you can visualize the difference.

White Crappie Pomoxis annularis
Species overview: Today the white crappie is found throughout Pennsylvania. It has been widely introduced around the United States. Biologists believe it was native to the Mississippi and Great Lakes watersheds, but not originally in Atlantic Coast watersheds. In Pennsylvania, the white crappie is less common than its cousin, the black crappie, but it is found across the state. The white crappie has a tendency sometimes to overpopulate its home waters, resulting in stunted fish. The species name “annularis” means “having rings,” and probably refers to the bars on the side of the fish’s body.

Black Crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus
Species overview: The black crappie closely resembles its cousin, the white crappie, but has physical and habitat differences. The range of the black crappie has been expanded through introduction. Originally it was found in the Mississippi watershed and eastern North America, and not present along the Atlantic Coast north of the Carolinas. Today in Pennsylvania it is widely distributed around the state. Its species name “nigromaculatus” means “black-spotted.” The black crappie’s nicknames are sometimes the same as those of the white crappie, and they include “calico bass,” “crappie bass” and “papermouth,” for its thin mouth tissues.
Identification: On first impressions, the black crappie looks black and white, but on closer examination it shows iridescent colors and sheens. Viewed from the front, its body is very compressed, narrow from side to side. Viewed from the side, it is deep-bodied, not as long-looking in its proportions as the white crappie. The back is olive to bright metallic-green, or a bluish gray. On its silvery sides are dark spots that are scattered or that appear in indistinct horizontal rows, not in vertical rows, as on the white crappie. There are also splotches that make a wavy pattern on its dorsal, anal and caudal fins. One way to distinguish the black crappie from the white is to count the spines on its dorsal fins. The black crappie has seven or eight spines on its dorsal fin. The white crappie has only five or six dorsal spines. Black crappies that live in clear, vegetated water have darker contrasting patterns on the body, while those from murkier water are lighter, appearing more “bleached.”

GABoy
04-11-2005, 09:38 AM
Here is a photo of a white crappie

GABoy
04-11-2005, 09:39 AM
Here is the photo of a black crappie...

But, please note during the spawn the males almost turn a jet black.

england
04-11-2005, 10:08 AM
Good information Gaboy. I should have been more clear myself. We assume most folks already know these basics. I myself will be more clear in the future.

GABoy
04-11-2005, 10:12 AM
I just got confused a little when CrappieLips said Most black crappie are males...I wasn't sure if he was referring to just during the spawn the color change or what.....

england
04-11-2005, 10:25 AM
I understand Gayboy

Have you ever caught white and black crappie spawning in the same area? I,ve always understood that the black crappie were very eggresive toward the white crappie. Here in my home lake in Mississippi. I sometimes catch them spawning on the same flat. That just kinda goes against some things I've read about the two species.

Tunica
04-11-2005, 10:38 AM
I understand Gayboy

Have you ever caught white and black crappie spawning in the same area? I,ve always understood that the black crappie were very eggresive toward the white crappie. Here in my home lake in Mississippi. I sometimes catch them spawning on the same flat. That just kinda goes against some things I've read about the two species.

They sure was intergrated yesterday or busing still is in effect were I was.

GABoy
04-11-2005, 11:08 AM
I understand Gaboy

Have you ever caught white and black crappie spawning in the same area? I,ve always understood that the black crappie were very eggresive toward the white crappie. Here in my home lake in Mississippi. I sometimes catch them spawning on the same flat. That just kinda goes against some things I've read about the two species.

Hey now.....I sure hope you didn't mean to misspell my name...ha ha!!

Actually....here in GA we don't have a whole lot of white crappie in my home lakes....and my other favorite location to fish is FL, where there are no white crappie at all.

So, I don't have a whole lot of experience in this arena....sorry!

CrappieLips
04-11-2005, 11:25 AM
I just got confused a little when CrappieLips said Most black crappie are males...I wasn't sure if he was referring to just during the spawn the color change or what.....
That what i meant GABoy During the spawn. I should have been more specific. yall don't catchem all, i'll have to wait till the water leak's out.

GABoy
04-11-2005, 11:57 AM
That what i meant GABoy During the spawn. I should have been more specific. yall don't catchem all, i'll have to wait till the water leak's out.

Gotcha'!!!

Just wanted to make sure we were talking apples to apples....

Yes, you are right during the spawn the males turn very dark.....it's a hormonal thing which is used to attract the females...I believe that was already said earlier.

Thanks for the clarification.

Cane Pole
04-11-2005, 12:59 PM
Colors can be confusing. Count the dorsal spikes. Six or less, it is a White. Seven or more, it is a Black. Now, does it really matter? They all taste the same out of the cooking pan...lol

DENNIS BOWERS
04-12-2005, 04:44 AM
I"ve Been Told The Black Crappie Spawn First As A General Rule.at Times They Will Be On The Beds Togeather But Usually Blacks First.the White Males Do Appear To Be Black Due To The Hormone Thing,but Like Canepole Said --count The Dorsal Spines! The Black Males Are Shallow Here Now,only Caught One White Male All Day Yesterday!!good Fishin To Ya!!dennis