PDA

View Full Version : Long Rods vs Short Rods



Fishin Ky
12-04-2007, 10:11 PM
I'm getting mixed opinions on this subject, so I wanted to see what you guys think about it. I currently use a 5' ultralight rod for casting jigs (I mostly use jigs to cast across the front of 3 or 4 docks and work the jig back), but I've been considering trying an 8' or 9' one because a couple of my friends say you can get more distance out of them. For casting light jigs, is a short rod or long rod better?

I'm comfortable with pretty much anything up to 9' already (I'm a recovering catfish addict that found a new addiction :D ). I've got my eye on the 9' WM universal crappie rod, but I don't want to buy one that short if it won't cast a jig well (I prefer 12' or 14' for spider rigging, so a 9' one would just gather dust in the garage).

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Barnacle Bill
12-04-2007, 10:27 PM
A lot of things come into play in getting more distance in a cast. The length of the rod, the size of the guides, the size of the reel, the size of the line, the action of the rod and most important is how you cast. I prefer a 6' rod with 4lb test on a Shimano 2500 size reel. The rod is rated for 2-6 lb line. I learned a long time ago to stop using my whole arm to cast and just use my wrist. (I still forget sometimes) You can get more distance and better accuracy once you get into the habit.

crappielimits
12-04-2007, 11:00 PM
Bass pro microlite in a 7' 6" is a great rod for casting light jigs.

kmatcek
12-04-2007, 11:01 PM
I like to whip action of a 9' rod when I cast.
But I like a to jig and fish the shallows in the spring and like to be as far from the fish as possible.
Just my two cents.
Oh and the type of reel and guides do make a difference. I use a shimano reel cant remember which model since they are at the lake house but is is a spinning type, might be the 2500 but not sure.

Ken Kinser
12-05-2007, 08:16 AM
I like the M/L berkley lightin rod 6'6"

jigsbydirk
12-05-2007, 08:23 AM
8' -9' rod is my preferred for casting and dragging jigs. Of course you will get more distance with lighter line.

CrappiePappy
12-05-2007, 10:15 AM
I'm getting mixed opinions on this subject, so I wanted to see what you guys think about it. I currently use a 5' ultralight rod for casting jigs (I mostly use jigs to cast across the front of 3 or 4 docks and work the jig back), but I've been considering trying an 8' or 9' one because a couple of my friends say you can get more distance out of them. For casting light jigs, is a short rod or long rod better?
I'm comfortable with pretty much anything up to 9' already (I'm a recovering catfish addict that found a new addiction :D ). I've got my eye on the 9' WM universal crappie rod, but I don't want to buy one that short if it won't cast a jig well (I prefer 12' or 14' for spider rigging, so a 9' one would just gather dust in the garage).
Any help would be greatly appreciated.


The longest rod I use to "cast" with ... is 8ft long. The shortest I use is 5ft long. I haven't really seen all that much difference in "distance" ... using the same weight jig and line size on either rod length (or the other "tween" lengths that I use). I don't cast for distance, so much, as I'm usually casting at a particular target. That target may be a spot in the water, over top of a submerged piece of cover, or it may be a actual piece of cover that's visable above the surface. If I can't reach where I want to ... I move the boat closer :p
The others are also correct - in their statements that reel size has a lot to do with casting distance. Long spool or wide spool reels will cast farther than UL's (small spool reels) ... on whatever length rod you use (well, up to a point, anyway .... I don't consider any rod over 9ft long as a "casting" rod, unless you're FNF fishing).
Limp line will also factor into casting distance. A couple of sprays of Real Magic on your reel's line, before starting your day of casting, will help.

I do have a question though ..... what's the reason you feel the need for the extra distance ?? Ain't many of the local lakes that I fish, that are clear enough to worry about getting closer to the target. Remember - the greater the distance you have to cover, the greater the margin of error on where the jig might end up ;) Unless I'm just fancasting over a open section of water, I'm more inclined to go for accuracy over distance. And, just for the record, I cast about 90-95% of the time ... and use a 7ft Sam Heaton Sig Series rod for most of my casting. My 5ft'r is mainly used for dock shooting, and my 8ft rods are backups and/or all purpose use (FnF - heavier jigs - tightline - trolling - drifting - etc).
IMHO ... a 7ft rod is a good all around casting rod length, if it's outfitted with the proper reel.

... cp :cool:

deathb4disco
12-05-2007, 10:22 AM
I have a bunch of rods from 4.5' to 14' -- haven't used the short ones in a LONG time. For shore fishing, I use the 12 to 14 footers. For boat fishing, I use 6.5 - 9 footers.

Bass Pro's 8.5' float n' fly rod is a good one. Also, check out light steelhead rods (don't laugh.) Cabela's Fish Eagle II is a good one for tossing jigs. I've used the "medium" version of this rod for years for trout. I can positively LAUNCH a small spinner or plug with it.

An added bonus of the longer rod is the fish feel bigger!:)

Cane Pole
12-05-2007, 10:24 AM
With a 10 foot Richard Williams pole, 4 lb Stren line, and a 1 oz bank weight, I can cast all the line off a Diawa DX40 reel.:D

deathb4disco
12-05-2007, 10:24 AM
I don't consider any rod over 9ft long as a "casting" rod, unless you're FNF fishing).

Many surf and fly fishermen would disagree with you!;)

CrappiePappy
12-05-2007, 10:34 AM
Many surf and fly fishermen would disagree with you!;)

I'm sure they would :p
But ... consider : a surf caster isn't throwing a 1/16oz (or less) bait :D
As for the "fly fishermen" ... they'd laugh at my 60yr old "el cheapo" fly rods, then choke when they saw the spinning reel and baitcast reel that I have attached to the two flyrods I own :eek: (which I primarily use to tightline & minner/float fish with). LOL !!!

... cp :cool:

Mopar Matt
12-05-2007, 10:54 AM
Prepare to fall in love my friend...Bass Pro Tourney Special 6'6" med lite action with a Shimano Solstace 1000RH and 4lb Berkley Sensation line. I have used this combo for a little over a year now, it is better than American Express, I never leave home without it. Quikfire on the reel makes for easy casts all day long, the rod has plenty of backbone, but is still very sensitive. I am an avid fishing rod fanatic, they are just like tools, you need the right one for each different type of job, but this one is forcing several other rods to just collect dust.

Shimano Reel (http://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10151_-1_10001_7575_100001002_100000000_100001000_100-1-2)
Tourney Special Rod (http://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10151_-1_10001_44529_100002002_100000000_100002000_100-2-2)

SMITTY 58D
12-05-2007, 11:07 AM
I'm getting mixed opinions on this subject, so I wanted to see what you guys think about it. I currently use a 5' ultralight rod for casting jigs (I mostly use jigs to cast across the front of 3 or 4 docks and work the jig back), but I've been considering trying an 8' or 9' one because a couple of my friends say you can get more distance out of them. For casting light jigs, is a short rod or long rod better?

I'm comfortable with pretty much anything up to 9' already (I'm a recovering catfish addict that found a new addiction :D ). I've got my eye on the 9' WM universal crappie rod, but I don't want to buy one that short if it won't cast a jig well (I prefer 12' or 14' for spider rigging, so a 9' one would just gather dust in the garage).

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Well I dont have a 9 foot rod but I do have an 11 foot BnM. I found that I mostly use this fishing a 30' drop off at my lake or when I want to under hand cast or pitch a minnow and cork under a dock. I've used it on shore and can cast pretty far but I have to have so much more room around, above and behind me to do so. I like using the UL and just fish the front and sides of the cover then work my way in so I dont spook all the fish. I try to keep my boat noise to a minimum as well, like putting oil on my swivel seat.

Backlash
12-05-2007, 12:11 PM
I use both short (4.5' and 5.5') UL rigs and the longer poles 8, 9 and 10 footers (UL). It all depends where I'm fishing (cover, etc.) If I really need to make an accurate cast to avoid trees, brush or somebody's head I use the shorter UL poles. I just sort of have a feeling which I need to be using based on where I am and I continue to experiment until I get it right!

pstone
12-05-2007, 12:22 PM
7-9 ft for casting. I admit I hardly ever cast, but when I do it is with an 8 fter...

DC Crappie Kid
12-05-2007, 12:38 PM
I can definitely say my 9 footer casts longer than my 5-6 footers. But I think it would be even better if it had more backbone. Casting it is like casting a wet noodle. It can be done, but it's not very accurate. And I don't think it's as efficient either (as far as distance goes), compared in theory to one somewhat stiffer. But the flexibility is actually what attracted me to this one originally, so I'm not going to give it up. The long rod I had before that broke on the first decent fish (the bottom section at that!)! So I'll keep the wet noodle around, and hopefully add one that's more stout in the near future. I don't have any "tweener" rods (7-8 ft), at least not light action rods. Sorry I can't help you there.

Kit Papermouth
12-05-2007, 12:44 PM
I start losing accuracy when the casting rod gets over 7'.

I like my 6' Microlite from Bass Pro.

But it's all about what you are comfortable with.

G.

Cane Pole
12-05-2007, 12:45 PM
funny DC


"tweener" rods

OKSTATEjiggy
12-05-2007, 02:09 PM
A fourteen foot (14') crappie rod!? LOL geez... I can hardly imagine. Seems like you'd be fishing with a telephone pole!

deathb4disco
12-05-2007, 02:35 PM
A fourteen foot (14') crappie rod!?

Perfect for float fishing from shore. And very fun for playing fish!

Barnacle Bill
12-05-2007, 02:44 PM
With a 10 foot Richard Williams pole, 4 lb Stren line, and a 1 oz bank weight, I can cast all the line off a Diawa DX40 reel.:D


Remind me the next time you are in SE Va. and I'll give you your sinker back.:D

PanMan_VA
12-05-2007, 03:16 PM
With a 10 foot Richard Williams pole, 4 lb Stren line, and a 1 oz bank weight, I can cast all the line off a Diawa DX40 reel.:D

...as long as the bail stays open:D

ad1974
12-05-2007, 05:20 PM
My 2 favorite lengths are 8 and 10 ft,I don't cast much at all and when I do it's usually lobbing out a bobber and both those lengths work well for that.I also use 7,9,11,12 and 14 ft rods,but could get by with just the 8 and 10 ft'ers most of the time.

slabmaster09
12-05-2007, 06:58 PM
Well i dont do much casting because all of the fishing i do is always vertical which i use a 10 foot bnm bucks best ultralight for.

ERNEST PATY
12-05-2007, 07:10 PM
I would reccomend a 6.5 foot spinning rod for casting jigs. While I do cast a lot with my 9' rod it doesn't have spinning guides and won't cast quite as far. I agree with pappy, why cast that far. When using the long rod (or a short one too) I usually shoot the jig rather than cast it.

GRIZZ
12-05-2007, 08:51 PM
I can't stand casting any light rods over 8 ft. They are just too floppy and the length doesn't improve casting distance. The ideal rod for casting light jigs IMHBAO(in my humble but accurate opinion) is a 6-7 foot light weight fast to extra fast action rod with a flexible tip. Ultralights are just to floppy for any decent casting. I know a few of you use 2 lb test, but I find it to fragile and haven't ever seen any definable advantage over 4 lb. 4 lb Gamma is amazingly strong compared to any 2 I have ever used.

Another reason I personally don't like to use ultralights is that there is a little too much play for setting hooks on really light biting fish. This is also why I don't like fishing with any rods over 7 feet for crappies. The longer floppy rods are just not quick enough setting the hook and I miss too many strikes.

Casting distance isn't too important for fishing from boats, but can make a difference when shore fishing, which I enjoy, in several situations. With pure shore fishing, sometimes that extra yard or two gets you to spots others cannot reach, also when fishing canals, especially wide ones, you can reach more fishing territory and more structure across canals with long casts.

On a purely prideful bent, it just feels better to be able to cast further than anyone else. :D When pier or shore casting in both fresh and salt water for larger fish, using good technique and premium gear, I can often cast twice as far as the others fishing there. With a 1 ounce casting/jigging spoon like a castmaster or a rattle snakie spoon and the proper rod I can empty a stradic 2500 casting for smallies, salmon, or steelies, but man it takes a long time to reel those casts in.

crappie slab man
11-12-2011, 01:04 PM
i'm new on here but love blogs and forms already,anyway i use a 7' wally marshall ultra lite rod from bass pro, with a 1500 wave spin reel a little pricy but perfect balance and have very few problems with tangles in line, great outfit if you enjoy fishing for panfish and small bass like i do, i also have one set up on 9' rod but seem to use 7 footer more i used to use 5 footers but once i went to longer rods they (5 footers) just set on rodrack use when grandkids fish with me. crappie slab man

ChrisCarter
01-15-2015, 09:01 PM
Sorry that I am digging this back up, but I need some advice on new rods and I didn't want to create another topic thread on this issue.

All I have ever used was the 5' UL Ugly Stick rods with some old reels that I had and put some light mono or nanofil line on them. The worked outstanding when it came to aiming at a particular target like a dock or tree like that. But majority of the time was spent free casting over a large open water area. I gotta tell you, depending of the size of the jig, it sometimes was very hard to get the distance that I wanted. So the idea this year is possibly go with a longer rod and possibly a new reel to go with it. Right now what I have is that 5' UL Ugly Stick (with a Mitchell Avocet II reel 2lb mono) which I'm going to have to replace and a 14' Crappie Maxx rod (with a reel with no brand but 2lb mono). I really have no buffer between the two.

So you guys tell me, what do you recommend to use when tossing 1/32nd oz jigs?

short grub
01-15-2015, 09:28 PM
I've always found that I'm more accurate casting to tight areas with a short rod, I seem to have more control

BoarBuster
01-15-2015, 09:56 PM
I have all lengths from 3' to 11' and I got some of the lengths just for spider rigging.

thill
01-16-2015, 01:59 AM
For casting, my sweet spot is between 6'6" and 7'.

I like that length because it makes for easy, long casts, yet it's still very controllable.

-TH

CrappiePappy
01-16-2015, 03:31 AM
For casting, my sweet spot is between 6'6" and 7'.

I like that length because it makes for easy, long casts, yet it's still very controllable.

-TH

I concur !! Plus, with a longer rod, you can pair it up with a larger reel and still have it balanced. I've also gone from parabolic bend rods (that bend like a C) to fast action tip rods (that bend like a J) ... which seem to load up and release faster, creating more energy and thus longer casts. A larger reel, or a least one with a wider spool or "long cast" spool, will allow the line to come off the reel in longer lengths per wrap (= greater distance) as well as not have line set in such small dimension coils (= less friction thru the guides).

My jig casting outfit is a 6'6" ESP PowerLite rod - Shimano Aero 1000 reel - 6lb test Vicious Panfish copolymer line (hi-vis) and is used primarily to cast 1/32 & 1/16oz jigs (weedless jighead & solid plastic body).

One thing that I've found, that helps a cast get more distance ... when your casting outfit has been sitting unused for a period of time ... is to tie the line to something that won't move, then walk off about the distance of two "very good" casts, then pull/stretch the line several times (holding it at the peak of the stretch for a few seconds) and then reel the line back on the spool with *moderate tension. This relaxes the coils, makes the line limper/straighter, and also removes any loose loops or line wraps that may have occurred during the last use.

(* moderate tension can be achieved by cutting the line loose & reeling back between your thumb & finger, under a tight pinch grip ---- or --- reeling the line against the object you're tied off to, with a good bend in the rod. I prefer the finger/thumb pinch loose line retrieve, because it also helps untwist the line)

... cp :kewl

DockShootinJack
01-16-2015, 03:54 AM
I have to agree with CrappiePappy and Thill. I just plain like the longer rods better. Another benefit I like is when fishing wind or current and its hard to keep slack out of the line you can still get a good hook set due to picking up more line on the rod sweep. Great for beginners that don't set the hook very hard.

thill
01-16-2015, 04:48 AM
Agree 100% about fast action rods and the longer sweep.

I like the 1500 size reels. My fav is the Daiwa Exceler/Cabelas Prodigy. Very good drags, I've caught 25 lb stripers on mine with no issue.

Something I've gone to is using super-thin, super-limp braid. My current favorite is a 10 lb. line I found on clearance that is no longer made. Crazy-thin stuff, hard to manage unless you are experienced w/braid, but it casts amazingly, does not float, ignores twist, and is tough as nails. And the sensitivity is off the chart, especially on long casts. I like a 6' leader of 4 lb flouro, but tied direct doesn't seem to lower the bite rate.


-TH

ChrisCarter
01-16-2015, 10:54 AM
Thanks for the info guys. This has done a great job in helping me pick out some new reels as well. Which is actually what I needed more help in deciding.

When I first started crappie fishing I used 6lb line, and didn't like the lack of sensitivity to it. So I went down to 4lb, and it felt much better. Last year was an experiment with 2lb, and while it was great, there were a few things I didn't like about it, especially when it came to pulling my catch or lure through the vegetation. So I will more than likely leave the 2lb on the smaller rod and jigging rod, but go with 4lb on the newer rods and reels. I think a 7' UL rod will be a great pickup. As for reels, I have a few models on my mind, but ultimately, I'll have to go to Cabelas or Bass Pro and physically see which one would better suit me.

I'll probably replace the Mitchell with another Mitchell, the one I have now works, but barely. The bale guide on it bent, and I did bend it back, but now sometimes it doesn't lock properly and can open back up when retrieving.

As for the 14' jigging pole, I know I want to keep the 2lb mono on that, but I'm not sure whether I want to keep the little spinning reel on that, or switch back to a baitcasting one. I don't think it would really matter if I'm using it primarily during wading in the weedbeds.

Crestliner08
01-16-2015, 01:07 PM
The more time I spend crappie fishing (20+ years now), the more I tend to favor the longer rods. Right now I have a 6'6" Microlite, two 7' B n' M SHSS, and one 9' B n' M SHSS. I've only had the 9' rod for one full season but the others I've had for many years. 90% of my crappie fishing is casting. I was a bit leery about moving up to the 9' rod for casting. But it has proven out to be my most favored rod for both casting and drifting light jigs. I balance these rods with either Plueger 6920 and/or a Shimano Symetres 500 series (no longer made....now it's the 750 series).

I have these rods casting 2# test Fireline with a 3' section of 2# test fluorocarbon. Our waters here are very clear and obstruction free, for the most part, so I can get away with the light line. I can cast the 9' rod extremely well with 1/16 oz. jigs. And the distances are greater than that of either the 7' or 6'6" rods in my arsenal. The B n' M SHSS in this length has plenty of backbone for great casts; yet is sensitive enough to pick up the slightest bite at 10'+ depths. If you try one, you'll love it. :)