PDA

View Full Version : New to fishing LOTS of ?



belle
06-25-2004, 09:51 PM
Hey all! My DH and I are new to this whole fishing thing. So far we have just been sitting on shore catching mostly perch, catfish and and sometimes a carp. The bug has definatly hit us and now I think we are ready to move on to the good stuff. We have access to a fishing boat, but really need some good advice before we head out.

First, We need to get a couple of rod and reels. as we looked through the Bass Pro book we quickly discovered we know ABSOLUTELY NOTHING about what we are looking at. I had no idea there were so many different types of these things out there. What do we need to look for, and what are the questions we need to ask to get ones that fit our needs. We want to start catching crappie, but don't want to limit ourselves to them. We would also like to go for bass. And we don't want to break the bank.

Second, We have a camper on Lake of the Ozarks, we know that crappie is the fish of choice where we are, do we just go up to someone and ask how to do it, or are we going to look like complete morons?

Third, ANY advice to get us on our way would be very muck appreciated.

Thanks so much!

Shellback
06-26-2004, 07:34 AM
I just bought a pair of crappie combo rods and reels at Bass Pro that were on sale at $19.95. They are the Zebco Bill Dance Gold models which come either as a trigger spin or spincast. I got the trigger spin #28-930-840-00 for myself, and the spincast 28-930-842-00 for my wife. They are regularly $24.95. There's no limit what you can spend on rod and reel setups, but these will work real nice for you and won't break your tackle budget.

Moose1am
06-26-2004, 09:48 AM
If you have a camp on LOTO then I would suggest that you find a good reputable crappie fishing guide and have him take you and your other half out for a half day of fishing. He can show you his fishing equipment and some spots. You will learn more in 1/2 from the guide than you can by reading books. The key is to get a good guide. Ask around first and find one though word of mouth.

Most of us who fish for crappie use graphite rods and spinning reels of some kind but you can go crappie fishing with a bamboo cane pole. The crappie don't care what type of pole you are using.

I use rods from 5ft long up to 12ft long. Most of the reels that I use are small untra light spinning reels (Open faced) and I put Trilene XL or Trilene IronSilk on them in 6lb test for crappie.

You can also check out the BnM poles and the Richard Williams Poles as they both will work for crappie fishing. I have a 12ft long BnM jig pole and a 7 1/2 ft long Richard Williams Crappie rod.

At Walmart they sell the Shakesphere untra light open faced spinning reels for under 20 bucks. They work great for crappie. Now they won't land a 12lb smallmouth bass as well as a much more expensive reel with a better drag system but they will land a 2lb largemouth or maybe even a larger fish if you play your cards right. The drag is the key to landing larger fish.

I have to go now but I will try to remember to post more about this after I get back home.

If you want a good book on crappie fishing I recommend the book called " Crappie Wisdom"





Hey all! My DH and I are new to this whole fishing thing. So far we have just been sitting on shore catching mostly perch, catfish and and sometimes a carp. The bug has definatly hit us and now I think we are ready to move on to the good stuff. We have access to a fishing boat, but really need some good advice before we head out.

First, We need to get a couple of rod and reels. as we looked through the Bass Pro book we quickly discovered we know ABSOLUTELY NOTHING about what we are looking at. I had no idea there were so many different types of these things out there. What do we need to look for, and what are the questions we need to ask to get ones that fit our needs. We want to start catching crappie, but don't want to limit ourselves to them. We would also like to go for bass. And we don't want to break the bank.

Second, We have a camper on Lake of the Ozarks, we know that crappie is the fish of choice where we are, do we just go up to someone and ask how to do it, or are we going to look like complete morons?

Third, ANY advice to get us on our way would be very muck appreciated.

Thanks so much!

CrappiePappy
06-27-2004, 11:31 AM
For starters, welcome to Crappie.com ! Glad to have you here - but understand that, during the Summer months, things may be a little slow on the board. You may get less answers, and they may take a little longer to appear ... but, stick around and check back often - the answers will come.

Most people, just getting into Crappie fishing, make the same realization that you have ... there's a ton of stuff out there, and they run from cheap to extremely expensive. To catch Crappie, throughout most of the year, a spinning or spincast outfit is probably your best choice. Let your conscience and budget be your guide. Although it is possible to use Bass equipment to catch Crappie (and even vice versa) ... you will lose a bit of the enjoyment of the fight, with the "heavier" action Bass stuff, on the Crappie. However - if you purchase good quality reels, that have extra line spools, you CAN make them work for both species - just spool one with 4-6lb line for Crappie ... the other with 8-10lb line for Bass (though that is still considered "light" line for some Bass fishing applications). A quality spinning rod of 6-7ft in length and Med Action to Med Heavy Action will work fine for the Bass application ... it just may be a bit stiff for Crappie. This will be evident in two ways - your ability to cast real light lures and the deadening effect it has on the fight of the fish. If you are of the intention of using these rods/reels for fishing straight down over the side of the boat - what most call "deadlining or tightlining" (what I call "still fishing") - then they will work fine. But, if you want to cast jigs, light lures, and such ... you'd be better served to seperate your equipment purchases into Crappie outfits and Bass outfits.
If I knew more about your waters and the ways you want to, or intend to, pursue the Crappie ... I may be of more help in recommending some tackle/equipment. It would be helpful to have a ball park figure on how much you are willing to spend on each outfit, or a maximum total purchase figure. It would also be of consequence as to how often this equipment is going to be utilized.
It is rightly said that you can catch Crappie on most any fishing equipment ... you're just more likely to catch them on the "proper" equipment, and you're definitely going to enjoy catching them more - if using "matched" equipment (matched meaning ultra-lite, light action, or even micro-lite equipment ...vs... the average sized fish you are most likely to encounter). Case in point - I can catch a 14in Crappie on a heavy action Bass rod/baitcaster reel/17lb test line (I have before), and it's merely a matter of just cranking the fish in. But, put the same fish on a light action rod/small spinning reel/4lb test line ... and the fight is on !!
I've caught crappie on poles from 4.5ft to 12ft long - reels from "all plastic el-cheapo's" to "high dollar" Bass reels (spinning & baitcasting) - lines from 4lb test to 20lb test ......... but my preference is "matched" equipment in the light to ultralight catagory. The feel of the fight is magnified by the lighter equipment and line - and that's what makes "catching" them so exciting to me. .........luck2ya ...............cp :cool:
ps - I do hope that "DH" stands for "Dear" Husband ..... :D

fatboy
06-27-2004, 03:27 PM
Belle, my grandfather when he was alive was a very avid hunter and fisherman. He was born and raised in Smithville, Tennessee on a farm. In the 1930's he and his family moved to Warren County, that is McMinnville Tennessee. The reason he moved is that Center HIll Lake was being built on his homeplace and it would soon be under water. So from the time i was very little until his death in 1983, he practically lived on that lake in the summer and he tried to teach me everything he could about catfishing, walleye fishing and CRAPPIE!!!! Once he died, i was 14 at the time, i had nobody else to go with. I was raised on a dairy farm and just fished farm ponds catching bluegill, catfish, bass and the occasional turtle. My father didn't have a boat, so i fished these ponds until i grew up and had to get a job and raise a family of my own. I know, i am long winded.
Last May, a friend of mine at work, who was 50 at the time, woke up, told his wife he didn't feel well and promptly hit the floor with a fatal hear attack. I attended his funeral and then i took a look at my life. Lets see, i am a father and a husband who works a full time job and runs a very successful business. I also had no time for fishing or doing anything i enjoyed when i was young and my grandfather was alive. A week later i had a 18'6 Hydra-Sports in my driveway. I had to try and remember what my grandfather taught me so long ago about Crappie. So i started reading all i could, visiting Crappie.com daily of course and doing my homework. A year later i sure have improved on catching them, but i have a long way to go also. The reason I prefer Crappie is i don't work myself to death catching them. It relaxes me, unlike Bass fishermen who wear themselves out casting and working the trolling motor. As far as equipment, i have the usual fish finder, depth flasher, water temp sensor. I have only three poles. One is a 5'6 Shakespeare trigger cast , closed face ultra-light combo. The other two are BnM poles that are 12' and 16'. The long poles have a plastic Uncle Buck"s reel from Bass Pro that are a whopping $5.00 each. You don't reel fish in with them, they just hold the line. I don't use fancy stuff, i just do it to relax. With all this cheap equipment, i managed to have the annual lake record on Woods Reservoir last year. A white Crappie that was 17 and 5/8" and 3lbs 21/2 oz. Sorry i got longwinded take care. You should talk to Jerry Blake in Arkansas. He does it for a living , so i think he is the guru. Take care.

www.dspressurewashing.com

Fatboy

Jerry Blake
06-27-2004, 05:21 PM
Belle, my grandfather when he was alive was a very avid hunter and fisherman. He was born and raised in Smithville, Tennessee on a farm. In the 1930's he and his family moved to Warren County, that is McMinnville Tennessee. The reason he moved is that Center HIll Lake was being built on his homeplace and it would soon be under water. So from the time i was very little until his death in 1983, he practically lived on that lake in the summer and he tried to teach me everything he could about catfishing, walleye fishing and CRAPPIE!!!! Once he died, i was 14 at the time, i had nobody else to go with. I was raised on a dairy farm and just fished farm ponds catching bluegill, catfish, bass and the occasional turtle. My father didn't have a boat, so i fished these ponds until i grew up and had to get a job and raise a family of my own. I know, i am long winded.
Last May, a friend of mine at work, who was 50 at the time, woke up, told his wife he didn't feel well and promptly hit the floor with a fatal hear attack. I attended his funeral and then i took a look at my life. Lets see, i am a father and a husband who works a full time job and runs a very successful business. I also had no time for fishing or doing anything i enjoyed when i was young and my grandfather was alive. A week later i had a 18'6 Hydra-Sports in my driveway. I had to try and remember what my grandfather taught me so long ago about Crappie. So i started reading all i could, visiting Crappie.com daily of course and doing my homework. A year later i sure have improved on catching them, but i have a long way to go also. The reason I prefer Crappie is i don't work myself to death catching them. It relaxes me, unlike Bass fishermen who wear themselves out casting and working the trolling motor. As far as equipment, i have the usual fish finder, depth flasher, water temp sensor. I have only three poles. One is a 5'6 Shakespeare trigger cast , closed face ultra-light combo. The other two are BnM poles that are 12' and 16'. The long poles have a plastic Uncle Buck"s reel from Bass Pro that are a whopping $5.00 each. You don't reel fish in with them, they just hold the line. I don't use fancy stuff, i just do it to relax. With all this cheap equipment, i managed to have the annual lake record on Woods Reservoir last year. A white Crappie that was 17 and 5/8" and 3lbs 21/2 oz. Sorry i got longwinded take care. You should talk to Jerry Blake in Arkansas. He does it for a living , so i think he is the guru. Take care.

www.dspressurewashing.com

Fatboy

Hey Jonathan,

Thanks for the vote of confidence but I don't know that I've attained the status of "guru" just yet - I still learn something about crappie fishing every time I go out.

Jerry Blake
06-27-2004, 05:50 PM
Hey all! My DH and I are new to this whole fishing thing. So far we have just been sitting on shore catching mostly perch, catfish and and sometimes a carp. The bug has definatly hit us and now I think we are ready to move on to the good stuff. We have access to a fishing boat, but really need some good advice before we head out.

First, We need to get a couple of rod and reels. as we looked through the Bass Pro book we quickly discovered we know ABSOLUTELY NOTHING about what we are looking at. I had no idea there were so many different types of these things out there. What do we need to look for, and what are the questions we need to ask to get ones that fit our needs. We want to start catching crappie, but don't want to limit ourselves to them. We would also like to go for bass. And we don't want to break the bank.

Second, We have a camper on Lake of the Ozarks, we know that crappie is the fish of choice where we are, do we just go up to someone and ask how to do it, or are we going to look like complete morons?

Third, ANY advice to get us on our way would be very muck appreciated.

Thanks so much!
Hey Belle,

Welcome aboard the board! You've come to the right place for info on the great sport of crappie fishing.

The info below is an edited copy of my reply to a very similar question a few weeks ago so you may have already read it.

We catch crappie year around here in Southwest Arkansas in deep (100-foot +) reservoirs around brushpiles that we sink at different depths to attract and hold crappie. Crappie will hang around most any kind of cover if it is at the right depth but wood seems to be the best cover for holding crappie year around.

For my clients many that have never crappie fished before the most efficient and productive method of finding crappie and maintaining the proper depth is with slip-floats. I use Thill Pencil Floats and Gizmo Bobber Stoppers on 8-pound Berkley XT Green line on 10 to 12 Crappie Jig poles.

We usually use live minnows but small hair jigs, tube jigs or twister tail jigs work too.

We use the length of the pole to measure our depth and adjust our bobber stops. Poles that are over 10-feet long are marked at 10-feet from the tip with finger nail polish.

By holding the bobber stopper at the butt of a 10-foot pole or at the 10-foot mark on longer poles and estimating the distance from the end of the pole to the hook you can then slide the stopper up or down the line to the desired depth.

If the hook hangs 2-feet from the end of the pole for example, you're fishing 12-feet deep, if it comes half-way down the pole then you are fishing 15-feet deep if it comes back to the mark then you are fishing 20-feet deep and so on.

I have rod holders down one side of my boat and we keep up to 6 rods in the holders and ease around a brushpile until a float goes under and we then set the hook and reel in the fish.

I only use one hook on each line but if Im not sure how deep the crappie are biting I start out with each pole set about 1-foot difference in depth until we start getting several bites at the same depth. Then I set all the poles within a few inches of that depth.

If youre ever in the Hot Springs Arkansas area and would be interested in a guided crappie fishing trip I could show you the system and equipment I use. If you have any specific questions please don't hesitate to ask.

Cane Pole
06-28-2004, 03:38 PM
Belle,

The trick to catching fish is not the equipment you can buy, but the equipment you have....desire, patience, and going and going and going...keep records of everything you do...keep it simple...fatboy is rite-on

Those Gizmo bobber stoppers Jerry spoke of work great. I use two...One above the bobber and one below the bobber, near the weight...I do this because if you get hung up in brush and break a line, you usually will not loose your bobber this way...I do this with the grandkids...

good luck,

Cane Pole

belle
06-30-2004, 08:32 AM
Thanks y'all, you need to start a book Crappie Fishing for Dummies. This has helped more than you know, if for nothing else than to get us to the point where we feel we can at least ask some of the right questions. DH (yes, that is dear hubbie) has a birthday coming up and I think we all know what he is getting (get you mind out of the gutter) fishing gear! We are headed to the lake Friday, and I truely cannot wait. Wish us luck and good fishing.

Crappie Chatt
06-30-2004, 09:14 AM
:D Hey Belle, give him a REAL treat,,,,let him catch more!! Heh! Heh! Heh! Also brag about how anybody can catch 'biguns',,,it takes a 'GOOD' fisher to detect & catch those lite-biting 'Little ones'. Have fun!!! <*)}}}><

jolle
07-02-2004, 01:04 PM
Well, there is a lot of good advice about gear, so I will throw a few hints about LOZ since I am from MO and know the lake fairly well.

Since there is very little standing timber in the lake anymore and everything is very commercialized, you will have to do some searching to find crappie hotspots. Many of the good spots are beds that people have made around their docks, although some are less than kind if you pull up and fish at their bed, despite being perfectly legal. You can also find brushpiles in other places, namely where a powerline crosses the lake in a cove or something and they have pushed the cleared brush into the water. It isn't visible from the surface, but a good fish finder will help out. If you have access to take a boat on the road a bit further, you might try Truman lake, as there is no lakeside development and it is much more of a fishing lake than LOZ.