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Tugaloo
02-23-2005, 02:58 PM
In reply to a recent post about getting skunked (again) on Hartwell, it was at least hinted at that I may have been getting bites that I missed. That it is very important to watch the line for the least sign of a twitch. OK, I can buy all that.

The thing is, tho, that now I'm wondering if I bought the wrong line for my crappie rigs. I had two get two different kinds in order to get the weights I wanted. In 6 lb I got some kind of "Camo" something line. I can't remember the name. I saw it recommended somewhere, maybe in a Bill Dance Crappie tape or book. In 4 lb I bought Stren Low Vis (green.) line. Both of these lines are pretty hard to see. Should I have gotten the "High Vis" line instead? It's a yellow or chartreuse color & looks like it would be very easy to see, or maybe the Stren original blue line. It's easier to see than the Low Vis.

So, I would like to find out what kind of line you guys are using.

TIA

Tugaloo

PIGINTHEPIGPEN
02-23-2005, 03:10 PM
I like to be able to see my line for the most part. I have 2 of my reels spooled with Stren Clear blue fluorescent in #6 test. One of my reels with Stren Hi Vis Gold in#6 test and my go to rod and reel spooled with Stren Super Braid in Hi Vis Gold in #8 test, only because I can't find it in #6
I have tried various other lines and always come back to Stren ;)

bugman
02-23-2005, 05:30 PM
I'm a line watcher, all my reels are spooled with 6 lb stren hi vis gold or 6 lb mr crappie hi vis. By being able to see my line has helped me catch alot of fish when the bite is light.I dont think i could ever go back to lo vis. I'm wondering if anyone has tried the cajun red line?

LBM
02-23-2005, 05:49 PM
I use 6 to 8 lb monofiliament for casting sliders and 8lb mono when flipping timber with 11 ft pole. All of my winter fishing is tightlining (two 1/4 oz jigs)using various braids even up to 50 lb. Current favorite is Power Pro 30# test. With our murky water in Northeast Kansas I don't think line visibility matters except for the fisherman to be able to see.
Wished Kansas would allow multiple rods so I could learn how to spider rig. But I think the spider riggers are missing the thrill of the thump one gets holding the rods. Guess for tournament type fishing the spider riggers would get more fish in the boat.
Ah what a terrible conditiong to be a addict and need that "Thump Fix".

Good fishing

DENNIS BOWERS
02-24-2005, 09:58 AM
TUGALOO-I USE HI VISABILITY LINE ON MOST OF MYPOLES[MR CRAPPIE],ON THE REST I USE RED CAJUN LINE--EASY ENOUGH TO SEE&DISAPEARS IN THE WATER!LINE WATCHING IS A MUST[unless float fishing],TIGHTLININ,JIGGING,ECT. A HI PERCENTAGE OF CRAPPIE ARE LIGHT BITES SO WHAT YOU DONT SEE CAN COST YOU!!I READ SOMEWHERE THAT A CRAPPIE CAN INHALE &EXHALE YOUR BAIT IN VERY FEWSECONDS-THUS SEEING YOUR LINE IS IMPORTANT TO ME!!GOOD FISHIN TO YA!!!!DENNIS

CrappiePappy
02-24-2005, 11:50 PM
For jig casting methods, I use Berkley Iron Silk Solar Mint in 4 & 6lb. My partner uses Stren Gold 4lb. We fish lakes that are mildly to moderately stained ... and the Crappie don't seem to care about the line color.
I also have outfits with BPS Excel, Trilene Photochromic, and Trilene XL. I even have one outfit with Maxima Fibre Glow (red) 8lb line, & one with Spiderwire 6/20. I've even spooled one with PowerPro 2/10 ... but haven't had a chance to use it, yet. I haven't experienced any times where line color has kept the fish from biting ... at least, not that I was aware of. :D
Being able to SEE the subtle "tic" in the line is as important to me as being able to "feel" any lite bites .... and in casting methods, it's probably MORE important (to me, anyway). Case in point - while fishing around a bridge foundation ... casting 1/16oz marabou jigs ... my partner and I weren't catching many. We were "expecting" the little "thump" or "line jump" that indicates a Crappie had inhaled the jig - wasn't happening !! But, I did notice that, at times, it felt like my jig was dragging across something ... kind of like a "vibration" or like dragging your jig across the parking lot - just an "electrical buzz" kind of feeling in the line. I thought it might be very small Bluegill or Shad "chewing" on the marabou tail. It made me mad, and I set the hook on one of those "feelings". The rod doubled over and I brought a nice Crappie into the boat. Apparently they were swimming along with the jig in their mouth, and "taste testing" it ....LOL!! From then on - we watched the line more closely, and waited for that little "vibration" feeling. We started catching more fish !! THEN is when we noticed that the line "vibrated" when the hit came ... only slightly, but noticable enough when you watched closely for it.
A Crappie "hit" can come in many forms ... and it can be as light as a "feather touch", all the way to a rod bending "slam". Being able to "see" line movement, before the fish can feel any resistance from your rod, gives you that crucial half second or so to register in your mind, that you have a hit. It's also as much fun as watching a float slowly disappear under the water's surface ....LOL!!
One trick I've learned, when using mono (clear/blue especially) ... and you're having trouble seeing the line, while casting --- is to cast the jig out, and after it hits the water - drop the rest of the line (from rod tip to where the line enters the water) onto the water's surface, getting it wet all the way from rod to jig ... then lift the rod tip back up to retrieve position and start reeling in. Wet line "shines" in the sunlight, more so than dry line. It even works on low-vis and photochromic lines, to a degree.
Hope some of this helps .............. luck2ya ..........cp :cool:

donr
02-25-2005, 01:59 AM
Once I decided to learn about wine. I learned enough to know that I didn't need to know more. I could have spent years, and lots of money laying down a wine celler, so as to match perfectly a variety, vinyard and vintage to a perfect meal. But all I wanted was the ability to make reasonably priced selections that would go well, if not perfectly, with the meals we had most of the time.
Discussions of fishing line lately remind me of debates between wine connoiseurs. "In my opinion the 20# PowerPro is too heavy for the crappie en frappe. An argument could be made for the green PowerPro 10#, but there is more finesse in a Stren 2#."
Unless you want to spend lots of time studying fishing line, and lots of dollars laying down a line celler, forget about making the perfect match of line type, brand and weight to every fishing situation. If your goal is to spool a reasonably priced line that will go well, if not perfectly, with the fishing you do most of the time, the fishing line counterpart to "red with meat and white with fish" is "10# or more with casting and 8# or less with spinning". More specific guidelines, without getting too particular, are: smaller line gets more bites, but may not handle the monster; hi-vis may get fewer bites, but helps hook more of the bites you get; less stretch gives more sensitivity but will tear hooks out if set too hard; mono must be changed often but is cheap.
My current choice for overall balance is PowerPro, a modern braid, but any good mono is not far behind.