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View Full Version : Jig under a cork for shallow water...



CliffordN
04-24-2017, 03:39 PM
Once I got away from shiners, and started using jigs, I learned to use a jig under a cork instead of tightlining, in shallow water. This gave me the ability to keep the boat back away from the bank, and not spook as many fish.
It's a lot quicker than using live bait, catches all types of fish, and is easy for kids to use as well.
Find the smallest float you can, that will decrease the amount of resistance when you get a hit, and use a bright color that is easy to see. Six pound test line will do just fine, and you can drop down to four if the water is really clear, although you will occasionally break a jig off...
I like to let it rest for a bit, then jerk the rod in small spurts, alternating between the two on the retrieve. Most hits seem to occur either as soon as it hits the water, or right after you finish jerking it, as the jig falls...
Using a nine foot rod with a limber tip produces great action, and I generally have the jig suspended three feet or less below the float. Start shallow, and work you way down till you find the magic number...
A sidearm cast seems to work best as the float and jig are low to the water, and not as likely to get hung in overhanging limbs.
I prefer a 1/32, or 1/16th jig in most cases, and a float shaped like a pear seems to produce the best action... This is a killer rig when the fish are up against the bank...
Good luck and good fishing!

Abbott
04-27-2017, 07:34 AM
have had a lot of luck using a method like this.

trypman1
04-27-2017, 08:57 AM
I love that rig.

Tracker81
04-30-2017, 07:04 PM
Once I got away from shiners, and started using jigs, I learned to use a jig under a cork instead of tightlining, in shallow water. This gave me the ability to keep the boat back away from the bank, and not spook as many fish.
It's a lot quicker than using live bait, catches all types of fish, and is easy for kids to use as well.
Find the smallest float you can, that will decrease the amount of resistance when you get a hit, and use a bright color that is easy to see. Six pound test line will do just fine, and you can drop down to four if the water is really clear, although you will occasionally break a jig off...
I like to let it rest for a bit, then jerk the rod in small spurts, alternating between the two on the retrieve. Most hits seem to occur either as soon as it hits the water, or right after you finish jerking it, as the jig falls...
Using a nine foot rod with a limber tip produces great action, and I generally have the jig suspended three feet or less below the float. Start shallow, and work you way down till you find the magic number...
A sidearm cast seems to work best as the float and jig are low to the water, and not as likely to get hung in overhanging limbs.
I prefer a 1/32, or 1/16th jig in most cases, and a float shaped like a pear seems to produce the best action... This is a killer rig when the fish are up against the bank...
Good luck and good fishing!
I have triedv1/32 and 1/16 oz jigs before and I can't keep my line thought enough. Does the bobber stay up right with that small of a setup.

Sent from my LGL62VL using Tapatalk

CrappiePappy
04-30-2017, 07:30 PM
I have triedv1/32 and 1/16 oz jigs before and I can't keep my line thought enough. Does the bobber stay up right with that small of a setup.

Sent from my LGL62VL using Tapatalk

You have to match the size of float to the weight of the jig you're using ... :twocents

CliffordN
05-01-2017, 02:15 PM
Correct! The bobber is about the size of, or smaller than, the last joint of your thumb...

CliffordN
05-01-2017, 06:11 PM
If one even sniffs it I can see it move....

DockShootinJack
05-21-2017, 05:40 PM
That method has always proved deadly in spring for me

kycreek
05-21-2017, 06:12 PM
Great style of fishing

LAHooligan
05-21-2017, 07:47 PM
I fish for Crappie like that alot. I use a slip bobber and a Bobby Garland baby shad 99% of the time and if there's no wind for it to drift I'll slowly crank it back. Those Thill bobber's have a side to side wobble on the retrieve that gets that jig hammered.

Crestliner08
05-22-2017, 06:11 AM
Excellent post. Extremely productive approach and method to catch the shallow, shy bites.

CliffordN
05-23-2017, 07:45 PM
Thank you. I thought the idea was to help folks with new methods, and I don't mind sharing something that has put a lot of fish in my boat...

Like2fish2
09-11-2017, 09:50 AM
Going to give this a try..sounds like fun.

chippo
10-15-2017, 03:25 AM
When fishing from the bank, especially in current I like a jig under a cork. I use weighted corks. Just a little twitch gives the jig nice motion and after working it up the current I can open the bail and let it feed down currents. Just outside of eddies are my friend, along with any structure or drop offs, good places for fish to wait for bait and not use much energy fighting the current. Most time in current along with the weighted cork I use 1/8 oz jig

Ketchn
10-15-2017, 06:30 AM
i use a float .....a bunch ....deep as 8 foot or so and the pinch on quill types ....never over 1/16 on the jig head and mostly 1/32 and 1/24 ....and ...
YES if you set it up right , they don't stand a chance .

huskerwill
10-15-2017, 10:47 AM
Everybody love to see a bobber go under, even us big kids!

hdhntr
10-15-2017, 02:17 PM
love these kind of posts, always learn something I already know but don't always use. thanks.

deathb4disco
10-15-2017, 02:59 PM
I do not use a float for jig fishing -- even in shallow water.

mac
10-15-2017, 03:43 PM
That's good info. Thanks

CrappiePappy
10-15-2017, 04:36 PM
I do not use a float for jig fishing -- even in shallow water.

I don't either, DB4D .... but, if I did, it would be the smallest one I could use and still hold up my jig. Otherwise I'd just use a lighter jig or marabou Road Runner :biggrin

deathb4disco
10-15-2017, 05:57 PM
I don't either, DB4D .... but, if I did, it would be the smallest one I could use and still hold up my jig. Otherwise I'd just use a lighter jig or marabou Road Runner :biggrin

Yeah, I've found a 1/64 oz is deadly in shallow water.

Jamesdean
12-13-2017, 07:40 PM
I have used this method using quilt type float...very deadly for the fishes...

Damion Kidd
01-11-2018, 11:41 AM
Why would this method not work in somewhat deeper water?other than problems casting?i fish old gravel pitts a lot that arent very deep and have had lots of luck with a float.just wondering why its not good deeper.Thanks

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Hanr3
01-11-2018, 12:18 PM
95% of the time fish with a slip bobber rig. Everything from 1ft to 25ft. Regardless of jig weight or float used, the key is a neutrally balanced rig. Add enough weight to the jig end so the float (slip bobber) goes under with a fish fart. Sometimes I set it up so the bobber is sinking extremely slowly. The goal; you don't want the fish to feel resistance of the float when it goes under. The finickier the bite the less resistance you need.
There is also another factor to consider, bait distance from the fish holding depth. If the bait is eye level, you could wait all day for that bobber to move and he put it between his check and gum before the bobber stood up. You want them to come up, inhale and take your bait back down. The colder the water the closer you need to be to them, 6" or less. When it's cold they are lethargic and won't expel energy to eat, unless they are getting ready to spawn.


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Damion Kidd
01-11-2018, 12:29 PM
95% of the time fish with a slip bobber rig. Everything from 1ft to 25ft. Regardless of jig weight or float used, the key is a neutrally balanced rig. Add enough weight to the jig end so the float (slip bobber) goes under with a fish fart. Sometimes I set it up so the bobber is sinking extremely slowly. The goal; you don't want the fish to feel resistance of the float when it goes under. The finickier the bite the less resistance you need.
There is also another factor to consider, bait distance from the fish holding depth. If the bait is eye level, you could wait all day for that bobber to move and he put it between his check and gum before the bobber stood up. You want them to come up, inhale and take your bait back down. The colder the water the closer you need to be to them, 6" or less. When it's cold they are lethargic and won't expel energy to eat, unless they are getting ready to spawn.


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Thanks for the info. Im fairly new to crappie fishing and still trying to find what works best for me.i have trouble detecting bites in cold weather and deep water.may try and see if this helps.

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Ketchn
01-12-2018, 06:47 AM
I am tellin ya this ....flat out DEADLY when done right ....
....KABOOM :highfive

Yaker
01-13-2018, 11:33 AM
Jig under a float has always produced well for me,not only for panfish but fish right on up to catfish.Dragging a tipped jig under a float across beds is killer.

CliffordN
02-15-2018, 08:04 AM
And, it's about that time to do it again!

CliffordN
02-15-2018, 08:10 AM
Something else I failed to mention in the original post is that the cork also allows you to leave the jig in a productive area for a long time, if the bite is slow... It is just hanging there right in their face, and sometimes that will bring a strike after a bit.

Retired2Fish
02-15-2018, 08:17 AM
Great information! Thanks everyone for your post.:ThumbsUp

jawjatek
09-29-2018, 01:23 PM
So how are y'all rigging this? I tried it with a Betts sliding float and bobber stop. I added a swivel above the jig to stop the bobber from falling all the way to the jig. Not sure if I really need that. I also have some clip-on spring loaded floats, but those become hard to cast at depths deeper than the rod is long. Right now the fish are pretty deep. Will try it out this week.

yobuck
09-29-2018, 03:26 PM
Ive not tried this but I certainly intend doing so.
I don't feel I have quite (the touch) with jigs as others do that ive fished with.
I think some just naturally have it better than others, and this method might help.
Ive been told also that jigs will always out fish minnows, to the point of never having them on the boat.
But ive found thats not always true in my case, so ill try this with those also.

chippo
09-29-2018, 07:13 PM
Thanks for the info. Im fairly new to crappie fishing and still trying to find what works best for me.i have trouble detecting bites in cold weather and deep water.may try and see if this helps.

Sent from my LGL62VL using Crappie.com Fishing mobile app (http://r.tapatalk.com/byo?rid=87936)
4 pound test high viz line and a sensitive rod is helpful in indicating light bites. Sometimes it is just a light twitch of your end eye of the sensitive rod or other times it may just be seeing your line easing off in a direction or just movement. I lift up and they are there. Watch my rod tip and line, especially when the light bite is on

jawjatek
09-29-2018, 08:08 PM
Tried it yesterday and learned something about slip bobbers: you need a bobber stop, split shot, or swivel between jig/bait and bobber so that when you get a snag and break off your jig, the bobber stays on the line, and you don't have to paddle over there and get it. Well, unless you snag the swivel, etc, anyway.

yobuck
09-30-2018, 08:45 AM
4 pound test high viz line and a sensitive rod is helpful in indicating light bites. Sometimes it is just a light twitch of your end eye of the sensitive rod or other times it may just be seeing your line easing off in a direction or just movement. I lift up and they are there. Watch my rod tip and line, especially when the light bite is on

Im quite familiar with the what to do and watch for, and I do. But there are times when other rods in a rod holder with a hook and minnow out fishes me, and that aint supposed to happen. lol

deathb4disco
09-30-2018, 09:32 AM
Im quite familiar with the what to do and watch for, and I do. But there are times when other rods in a rod holder with a hook and minnow out fishes me, and that aint supposed to happen. lol

Whatever advantage minnows might provide is trumped by the sheer convenience of jigs.

Cane Pole
09-30-2018, 12:59 PM
Whatever advantage minnows might provide is trumped by the sheer convenience of jigs.

I can't convince my wife, so minners for dinner.

deathb4disco
09-30-2018, 01:52 PM
I can't convince my wife, so minners for dinner.

Happy wife, happy life. :)

Grainraiser
10-01-2018, 04:55 PM
This method is deadly when fishing the spawn along a rip rap bank. I like the Trout Magnet floats because they are the smallest floats I can find that can be used as slip floats. I rig them with a 1/24 jig head and this combo works great. At my local lake the spawning crappie are never more than 6ft from the bank. A old timer taught me to not cast toward the bank but to cast parallel to the bank to keep you bait in the strike zone much longer. I can't wait for spring to get here.