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FSHNJON
02-01-2007, 02:24 PM
When people talk about measuring water temp , at what depth are they usually talking about ?It seems like there would be a difference between surface temp and what it measures on say a transom of a boat .

Thanks Jon

mighty
02-01-2007, 02:27 PM
from my understanding it is the surface temp and the deeper you the cooler or warmer it is. Winter warmed, summer/ cooler

Jerry Blake
02-01-2007, 03:00 PM
My temperature readings come from my transom mounted transducer, which is about 8-inches below the surface when not on-plane.

gooch
02-01-2007, 03:43 PM
When I was fishing out of a little 12 foot jon boat I had a thermometer that was made to sink and check the temps at different levels of water. I have always wondered why it makes any difference at all what the surface water temp when the fish are 20 foot deep. You go to Ouachita in the summer and the surface temp is 90 and it will be below 60 just below the thermocline where the fish are.

Jerry Blake
02-01-2007, 04:04 PM
When I was fishing out of a little 12 foot jon boat I had a thermometer that was made to sink and check the temps at different levels of water. I have always wondered why it makes any difference at all what the surface water temp when the fish are 20 foot deep. You go to Ouachita in the summer and the surface temp is 90 and it will be below 60 just below the thermopile where the fish are.

Hey Gooch:

I keep an eye on surface temperature because there seens to be a direct correlation between surface temperature or changes in surface temperature and the depth you are likely to find fish on any given day on any given part of the lake. There's no magic numbers but if you watch the surface temps year around on the lakes you fish you'll have a good idea where to start looking for the hungry ones each time you go out. Of course they will occasionally stray from the norm just to keep thinks interesting.

Now quit playing around on the computer and GET BACK TO WORK!

ceb
02-01-2007, 04:23 PM
Hey Gooch:

I keep an eye on surface temperature because there seens to be a direct correlation between surface temperature or changes in surface temperature and the depth you are likely to find fish on any given day on any given part of the lake. There's no magic numbers but if you watch the surface temps year around on the lakes you fish you'll have a good idea where to start looking for the hungry ones each time you go out. Of course they will occasionally stray from the norm just to keep thinks interesting.

Now quit playing around on the computer and GET BACK TO WORK!

Preach on Brother Jerry! Dang government employees...:D

There are some correlations between surface temps and what is going on around, especially as the seasons start to change. When spring time gets here, surface temp can help guide you to the fish. If the temp is still too low, you can exclude a lot of shallow water spawning fish. If it's late in the spawn, a higher temp can tell you that they've probably moved back off into deeper water. These same patterns can also be applied to fall fishing.

I'm not much of a caster, but I've heard that the crappie will usually start chasin' a bait pretty good when the surface temp gets above 50 degrees.

NIMROD
02-01-2007, 04:37 PM
My temp gauge is on my trolling motor mounted transducer. I only worry about surface temps in the spring when Crappie are wanting to go shallow.:D

Jerry Blake
02-01-2007, 04:37 PM
Preach on Brother Jerry! Dang government employees...:D

There are some correlations between surface temps and what is going on around, especially as the seasons start to change. When spring time gets here, surface temp can help guide you to the fish. If the temp is still too low, you can exclude a lot of shallow water spawning fish. If it's late in the spawn, a higher temp can tell you that they've probably moved back off into deeper water. These same patterns can also be applied to fall fishing.

I'm not much of a caster, but I've heard that the crappie will usually start chasin' a bait pretty good when the surface temp gets above 50 degrees.

Being on the water nearly every day (well not in the weather we've been having lately) I've notice that changes in water temperature have a big impact on how crappie move. I've caught them in the shallows in early spring way before the water is warm enough to spawn but right after a few degrees rise in surface temperature from as low as the mid to upper 40s.

I figure they are trying to get the spawn started as early as possible and the males especially are trying to get a jump start on staking out their territory. But I've also found females in shallow water right after a sudden warm up, especially if it's from a warm rain that also raises the water level. They don't stick around very long though if the temps don't continue to rise. If the temps fall at all they are gone for sure.

TapOut64
02-01-2007, 04:55 PM
This past summer on a lake I fish in southeastern Virginia I took temp reading at the surface, 10' deep and 20' deep. All readings were the same. I was surprised. The lakes deepest holes are 35'.

crappiefarmer
02-01-2007, 05:50 PM
In the spring, The spawn is the main driver to run them up but after the spawn the rest of the year until the next spawn, then it all revolves around comfort and oxygen levels. What would their prefered water temp be? CF

Minnerman
02-02-2007, 10:24 AM
I have been told that when the air temp from day and night totals 100 degrees (60degrees during the day + 40degrees during the night= 100 degrees) for 3 straight days the fish will start their journey to the banks. Now this is not science, just bait shop talk from the old timers, but it seems to be fairly accurate for Central Mississippi and central Alabama waters. Just another theory for those who keep good stats to ponder on.

Cane Pole
02-02-2007, 10:12 PM
Here is a temp vs depth gage I have posted before. It pretty accurate in Tennessee and surrounding countries. Temp is my co-pilot. I do go by the moon and by the weather fronts too, but not as much as by the temp. What I know?