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View Full Version : Where do you measure line from ?



hunter71
08-15-2015, 11:59 AM
I'm tryin my luck at trolling cranks. When letting line out should it be measure from the rod tip or where the line make contact with water? Thanks

floatntiny
08-15-2015, 01:02 PM
I measure from the rod tip but that's just how I do it.

"G"
08-15-2015, 01:15 PM
From where line makes contact to the water

wilbur
08-15-2015, 01:16 PM
The depth charts are for where the line hits water

hunter71
08-15-2015, 01:48 PM
Thanks, I was referring to using a depth chart. I seem to be hitting water further back when I let more line out. Should that happen?

"G"
08-15-2015, 01:56 PM
I look at the depth on my chart....I drop my crankbait in the water....reset line counter and let out line ( with rod in rod holder) untill the counter reads the number of feet out that I want.....then with the rod in the rodholder I estmate how many feet from rod tip to where the line enters the water....then watching my counter I let that many more feet of line out.

hunter71
08-15-2015, 04:48 PM
I look at the depth on my chart....I drop my crankbait in the water....reset line counter and let out line ( with rod in rod holder) untill the counter reads the number of feet out that I want.....then with the rod in the rodholder I estmate how many feet from rod tip to where the line enters the water....then watching my counter I let that many more feet of line out.

I'm using depth hunter power pro 10/40 because I'm fishing timber. With 125' line out from rod ( been counting it wrong) with bandit 300 it's about 45 ' before it contacts to water. That sound about right?

CrappiePappy
08-15-2015, 08:24 PM
I'm using depth hunter power pro 10/40 because I'm fishing timber. With 125' line out from rod ( been counting it wrong) with bandit 300 it's about 45 ' before it contacts to water. That sound about right?

It might depend on how high above the water that your rod tips are. Not sure it's all that critical when long line trolling, but the angle of the line and how high off the water your rod tips are is a factor when trolling cranks behind weights. Crank pushers/pullers around here are generally using 2oz weights ahead of their crankbaits, and their rod tips are very close to the water on the "pushing" rods. The "pulling" rods (out the back) are using the same setup, but angled upwards ... so they have to put out more line length to get the crank to the same depth.

My first experience with cranks was from the back (pulling), while my buddies were pushing out the front. They told me to let out between 45-50ft of line on the two rods I was using, and I thought they were using the same line length ... but, come to find out they were letting out around 25ft of line. Their rods were just off the water's surface, while my rods had 20-25ft of line "in the air" from the rod tips to the water. We were essentially running the cranks at around the same depth, but I had to put out more line to compensate for the discrepancy in distance of line from rod tip to water's surface.

... cp :kewl

LowePro
08-15-2015, 08:55 PM
Either where the rod tip is or where it hits the water! If ur going to base depth from rod tip u have to know about high the rod tip is out of the water and deduct that from the depth of ur dive chart. If u want to deduct length of line from where line enters water is a different equation to get the same answer. I do my math from my rod tip because it takes a step out of the equation to get the same number. But in all actuality, geometry is geometry. The angle is the same and the hypotenuse is the same. But there are several different ways to come up with the correct answer.

Say for instance I want to fish 15ft down. If my rod tip were dragging the water I would go out 91 feet.
If my rod tip is 1 foot out of the water, then I would have to fish 109 feet out which would equal 16 feet deep from the rod tip, but.....the tip is one foot out of the water. So I am actually fishing the desired 15 feet deep with the 109 foot out.

Or u could do a more difficult equation of trying to GUESS the distance from where the line is hitting the water to the tip of the rod. Then subtract that distance from the actual feet out. And then plug ur answer to the depth chart.

The first way, I can do that math in my head effortlessly. Other way takes some thinking lol. Either way works, just different approaches to the same answer.

hunter71
08-15-2015, 09:48 PM
Eitherwhere the rod tip is or where it hits the water! If ur going to base depth from rod tip u have to know about high the rod tip is out of the water and deduct that from the depth of ur dive chart. If u want to deduct length of line from where line enters water is a different equation to get the same answer. I do my math from my rod tip because it takes a step out of the equation to get the same number. But in all actuality, geometry is geometry. The angle is the same and the hypotenuse is the same. But there are several different ways to come up with the correct answer.

Say for instance I want to fish 15ft down. If my rod tip were dragging the water I would go out 91 feet.
If my rod tip is 1 foot out of the water, then I would have to fish 109 feet out which would equal 16 feet deep from the rod tip, but.....the tip is one foot out of the water. So I am actually fishing the desired 15 feet deep with the 109 foot out.

Or u could do a more difficult equation of trying to GUESS the distance from where the line is hitting the water to the tip of the rod. Then subtract that distance from the actual feet out. And then plug ur answer to the depth chart.

The first way, I can do that math in my head effortlessly. Other way takes some thinking lol. Either way works, just different approaches to the same answer.

Didn't think about it that way but that makes sence. Mounted my rod holder on the rail of my pontoon so rod nip is 6' or so to the water surface so if want to lure at 15' deep I'll have let out enough to get 21'. Thanks for all the help guys!

LowePro
08-16-2015, 09:39 AM
Hahahaha believe it or not....in the 10th grade my geometry had so much trouble with me because I told her geometry was ridiculous and I would never use it in my life! Good thing that butt whooping from mom straightened me out, cuz i use geometry ALL the time! And especially when cranking! Which I could not live my life without! Hahaha

yikess
08-16-2015, 03:42 PM
From where it enters the water. I have seen folks around here with their rod tips 10 feet out of the water. No way any depth chart would do them any good fishing like that counting from the rod tip. Lol

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2

hunter71
08-16-2015, 05:29 PM
Hahahaha believe it or not....in the 10th grade my geometry had so much trouble with me because I told her geometry was ridiculous and I would never use it in my life! Good thing that butt whooping from mom straightened me out, cuz i use geometry ALL the time! And especially when cranking! Which I could not live my life without! Hahaha

I hear ya! I wish that I was as smart now as I thought I was then😉

hunter71
08-16-2015, 07:02 PM
From where it enters the water. I have seen folks around here with their rodips 10 feet out of the water. No way any depth chart would do them any good fishing like that counting from the rod tip. Lol

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2

That was kinda what I was doing. I wasn't getting hung up near enough for where I was fishing. Lol

bfish
08-16-2015, 07:22 PM
It doesn't really matter too much. The difference say for a Bandit 300 that runs between 16 and 17 ft is 30 ft of line. I find more variance between individual plugs than worrying about a few feet of height of the rod tip.

NickD
08-17-2015, 05:16 PM
To be the most accurate, it's where the line meets the water. A big advantage of using planer boards is that its easier to get an accurate depth since the line is always at the water at the same place. Line out starts where you clip the back release on the line. The distance from the rod to the planer board has no bearing on depth.

LowePro
08-18-2015, 07:22 AM
True story about the planet boards. I will do a drawing of a pic after I get done clearing these food plots describing the geometry of it.

yikess
08-18-2015, 01:00 PM
To be the most accurate, it's where the line meets the water. A big advantage of using planer boards is that its easier to get an accurate depth since the line is always at the water at the same place. Line out starts where you clip the back release on the line. The distance from the rod to the planer board has no bearing on depth.

Exactly right. If your going to count line that's out of the water then you might as well count the line that's still on your reel as well because it's not fishing either. If your rod tips are set 1 foot above the surface then your going to have a lot less line "not fishing" than the guy with his poles set 10 feet in the air when your pulling at 1.8 mph with a Bandit 300. Accuracy and duplication is key.