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View Full Version : Drop shot for Crappie ?



RiceRocket
07-16-2015, 11:57 AM
Anyone do it ?? If so , How ?

brushnjigs
07-16-2015, 01:11 PM
sent pm

Cmj
07-16-2015, 01:57 PM
sent pm


Why?

M R Dux
07-16-2015, 03:05 PM
I used to do it a lot in the wintertime 30 years ago, long before anybody thought up some fancy name for it.

I used my bass baitcasters to target schooled crappie on drops. I would take a 1/2 oz bass casting sinker and tie it to the end of the line, come up about 18 inches and tie off a short loop and put a #2 or #1 bronze Aberdeen minnow hook with a shiner minnow hooked from the throat latch up thru the top of the head. I wasn't worried about the minnow being lively, that was up to me to provide the movement.

I would position my boat on the shallow side of a drop that I had marked fish on with my Lowrance 1510c paper graph. I would cast to the deep side of the drop then hop the minnow rig back up the drop. Caught some big stringers of big crappie while everybody else was either duck hunting or sitting next to the fire.

huntinslabs
07-16-2015, 03:16 PM
Why?

+1 why pm? Didnt ask for a gps coordinate or any info other than technique.

shipahoy41
07-16-2015, 03:54 PM
Here is a stickie about knots and rig drawings. http://www.crappie.com/crappie/main-crappie-fishing-forum/157592-knots-rig-drawings-setups-beginners/ I am sure drop shotting is in there somewhere. I believe that for crappie in waters up to 25 feet you are better using a slip float or Kentucky rig method.

jeepguyjames
07-18-2015, 01:38 AM
Check out the spin shot hooks made by VMC for drop shotting ( line twist can be a pain in the rump when drop shot fishing ).......have drop shot fished Erie for smallmouth and various places for large mouth...... Have tried it a few times crappie fishing and did pretty ok....... Fluro carbon line or braid with a Fluro carbon leader is good....... A rod with a really fast action is a definite....... Done well drop shotting the lake fork ( crappie ) swim baits or the bobby Garland scent wigglers....... Usually in summer on main lake structure and cover ........ Or when fish are close to bottom tight to cover.......

RiceRocket
07-18-2015, 05:30 AM
I fish Florida , The St. Johns River which is shallow except for some holes 6 to 12 ft , was thinking in the summer heat drop shot might work ???

shipahoy41
07-18-2015, 06:55 AM
I fish Florida , The St. Johns River which is shallow except for some holes 6 to 12 ft , was thinking in the summer heat drop shot might work ???
6-12 foot I would still use the slip float method for more sensitivity and the reaction time when seeing the slip float twitch or move.

jeepguyjames
07-18-2015, 07:56 AM
I've never drop shot fished consistently any shallower than 5 fow to be honest ....... I'd be more inclined to throw float-n-fly / jig-n-bobber , swim a 32nd oz jig, or vertical jig with a real long rod in that shallow of water ....... If your talking about dropshotting the deeper holes it'd be worth a shot

Kevin22
07-19-2015, 10:57 PM
Yes, i use it when fish are hugging bottom and wont chase jigs.

I use 1/8-1/4 weights with a 2-3' leader to the hook. Tie with a palomar or you will have problems. I like the 1 and 2.5 gulp minnows, zoom tiny fluke, and other minnow shaped baits. Tubes dont want to stay on the hook, a solid body might though.

Drop to bottom and shake the line. If one doesnt hit then drag the weight about a foot and shake some more.

A bite will feel like a light tick or just dead weight. You will need light, sensitive line and a very sensitive rod. A $20 special wont cut it. Remember this is a technique for inactive fish... They arent going to grab on and wait for you to reel them in. Most people who have no success with drop shot are getting bites and dont even know it, they dont have the correct gear.

lol11
07-29-2015, 12:39 PM
I dropped shot for 25 ft. deep crappies last year. There was no reason, I just did it to try it out and it works but I still ended up hoovering / spot locking directly over them and jigged straight down. Crappies are known suspenders at different depths during the day/year and vertical jigging was just much easier because I can raise or lower the bait quickly. I can't do that with a drop shot rig, only have so much line between the hook and the sinker or I would have to re-tie.

I was thinking of the logic behind the drop shot. Have not done much research but to me, it is designed to keep the plastic wiggling in the same position (mostly on the ground) on a small targeted area from a distant to hopefully piss off the fish and trigger an attack bite. I can see this method being more effective if male crappies were guarding nests in shallow ground. Assuming that I did not have cane poles to reach them or bobbers on hand, I would improvise using the drop shot not to scare them off the nests.

Hanr3
07-29-2015, 08:47 PM
I dropped shot for 25 ft. deep crappies last year. There was no reason, I just did it to try it out and it works but I still ended up hoovering / spot locking directly over them and jigged straight down. Crappies are known suspenders at different depths during the day/year and vertical jigging was just much easier because I can raise or lower the bait quickly. I can't do that with a drop shot rig, only have so much line between the hook and the sinker or I would have to re-tie.

I was thinking of the logic behind the drop shot. Have not done much research but to me, it is designed to keep the plastic wiggling in the same position (mostly on the ground) on a small targeted area from a distant to hopefully piss off the fish and trigger an attack bite. I can see this method being more effective if male crappies were guarding nests in shallow ground. Assuming that I did not have cane poles to reach them or bobbers on hand, I would improvise using the drop shot not to scare them off the nests.

Almost- Crappie feed up, rarely do they feed down. The drop shot is to get the bait down to their depth quickly. Fixing the distance above the weight ensure the bait is above the crappie on the bottom. IF you know your gear, you can drop it down any depth. Some prefer a slip bobber knot to adjust depth. I prefer to drop to bottom, and slowly retrieve it back up. It is easier to detect a strike on the way up, tight line, verse on the way down, slack line. Another technique with the drop shot is a slow troll. The weight holds the bait vertical as you move through the water.

Honestly, I would never use a drop shot for shallow water. A properly rigged slip bobber is far more effective for anything 12' and under.

RiceRocket
08-02-2015, 07:17 AM
Thanks for everyone help , will be trying info asap RR

hays47
08-02-2015, 08:31 AM
http://i962.photobucket.com/albums/ae109/hays1029/dropshot%20tie%201_zpsqmjiodao.jpg (http://s962.photobucket.com/user/hays1029/media/dropshot%20tie%201_zpsqmjiodao.jpg.html)

Using the spin shot hooks is expensive per rig. They work though and work well. Below is an economy rig that works just as well for a lot less money.

http://i962.photobucket.com/albums/ae109/hays1029/dropshot%20tie%202_zps04zoocyb.jpg (http://s962.photobucket.com/user/hays1029/media/dropshot%20tie%202_zps04zoocyb.jpg.html)

I make these rigs using jig hooks and tying a small heavy mono line loop in front of hook leg. Swivel at each end keeps tangles to a minimum. Jig hooks are much less expensive than any drop shot hook.

http://i962.photobucket.com/albums/ae109/hays1029/dropshot%20weight_zpsyqdbjgvs.jpg (http://s962.photobucket.com/user/hays1029/media/dropshot%20weight_zpsyqdbjgvs.jpg.html)

These are what I make for weights. They vary in length and weight. From 1/32 oz to 3/4 oz. and as short as couple inches on length to as much as a foot. Sometimes I use a hand tied jig as weight and results in bonus species now and then.

I keep about two dozen pre-tied rigs on boat to allow quick replacement of lost or broken rigs. Mostly use in water deeper than 15 foot. But have also used in conjunction with a slip bobber. I use just enough weight to sink bobber. Then adjust stop so that the bobber appears to be floating as normal. This assures that the rig keeps in contact with bottom. For days when the fish seem to hug bottom. Example when bottom hook is six inches to swivel and weight has six inch arm. My lure or bait is exactly one foot off the bottom.

While I had crappies mostly in mind when making these rigs. They have worked on everything. In fact on smallmouth bass a little too well. At one local lake here in Ohio they are almost a nuisance on these rigs. Since I don't keep them the rig allows a quick release as very seldom does the hook get swallowed. A side bonus of the rig. Also yellow perch up here love to hug bottom and rig can be quickly adjusted when I run into these.

fiveeyes
08-02-2015, 04:03 PM
Hays 47..that is some good stuff right there..gonna steal some of this :ThumbsUp 5

Hanr3
08-03-2015, 11:15 PM
I agree with Fiveyes, good stuff Hayes47.