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bigben1
04-06-2015, 04:15 PM
Can someone post a picture of how to hold the jig when your dock shooting. Really don't want to jab a hook in my fingers.......LOL

DockShootinJack
04-06-2015, 04:20 PM
There are allot of videos on youtube.

kickingback
04-06-2015, 05:33 PM
I would suggest to NOT hold the hook end or you will eventually be hung! Hold by the head for safety and accuracy.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVGJABqGRKw

lowe175
04-06-2015, 06:07 PM
2 what kickingback said

lowe175
04-06-2015, 06:10 PM
Also I would recommend going with someone that's good at dock shooting it will speed up the learning curve. This is one of the most difficult tactics to learn on your own.

johndeere5045
04-06-2015, 07:24 PM
Practice at the house. Set up something horizontal about 2-3 ft off of ground. This will give you the idea of how everything works together.

Gabepeeps
04-06-2015, 09:05 PM
Most important thing is to hold your rod parallel with the water. Pointing rod up or down will definitely end in a misfire.

Gobob
04-06-2015, 09:31 PM
Good video thanks for sharing I could listen to Wally all day

CrappiePappy
04-06-2015, 09:36 PM
Yes ... you definitely want to hold the jig by the lead head and with the hook point pointing away from your hand.

Here's a discussion from 2006 that might also help with the learning curve. Forget the specifics mentioned about my rods/reels, as they've changed over the last 9yrs .... but, concentrate on the actual shooting technique, as far as rod/line aiming & release timing. http://www.crappie.com/crappie/main-crappie-fishing-forum/17807-shooting-docks-tecnique-2.html

And remember ... the narrower the space your jig can get through, to get way back under the dock & in the darkest shaded spot, the more accuracy matters. At those times you want the jig to hit the water's surface just at the edge of the dock and skip off the water. So, while you're practicing your aim & release timing, make a point to not only shoot the jig straight into a bucket, but also to SKIP the jig INTO the bucket.

I'm also a believer that the quick little splashes, made by a skipping jig, are a more natural sound to the fish than a single splash ... as it may imitate a fleeing Shad or Silverside minnow, and get the Crappie's attention, making them look for the injured & sinking minnow.

And once I've completed a few rounds of shooting a dock, I like to follow up with this technique : Crappie Pappy Article (http://www.crappie.com/articles/crappiepappy.htm)

... cp :kewl

bigben1
04-06-2015, 10:07 PM
Hey thanks for the help I'm going to try this out I'm more of a casting fishermen I dont spider rig or long line and this method should help me in my fishing

cajun fryer
04-07-2015, 07:21 AM
what is better longer or shorter rod?

CrappiePappy
04-07-2015, 11:54 AM
what is better longer or shorter rod?

I've tried it with rods from 5' to 8' - Microlite to UL to Med - and settled on my 5'6" or 6'6" fast action tip rods. Having a wide spool or "long cast spool" reel is a key factor, regardless of rod length, as is having limp/supple line that hasn't got a lot of set coils in it. I usually tie off the tag end of line and pull off 50' or so, then stretch it out by pulling it tight & holding it for a few seconds ... then let off & repeat the process a couple more times, before reeling the line back on the reel under moderate to heavy tension (finger/thumb pressure). That seems to relax the line & take out most of the coils that occur from the reels sitting unused for long periods, plus remove a lot of the twists that may have occurred from the last time it was used.

... cp :kewl

SpeckMaster
04-07-2015, 02:57 PM
I've tried it with rods from 5' to 8' - Microlite to UL to Med - and settled on my 5'6" or 6'6" fast action tip rods. Having a wide spool or "long cast spool" reel is a key factor, regardless of rod length, as is having limp/supple line that hasn't got a lot of set coils in it. I usually tie off the tag end of line and pull off 50' or so, then stretch it out by pulling it tight & holding it for a few seconds ... then let off & repeat the process a couple more times, before reeling the line back on the reel under moderate to heavy tension (finger/thumb pressure). That seems to relax the line & take out most of the coils that occur from the reels sitting unused for long periods, plus remove a lot of the twists that may have occurred from the last time it was used.

... cp :kewl


Thanks for the equipment tips. I mostly use ultra and light tackle and flexible, low memory line really helps. Memory coils, stiff line and line twist can ruin your day, especially with light tackle.

I've been looking at the Pflueger Arbors, specifically because of the large diameter spool. Have you used them? I'd be very interested in your opinion on them.

The way I fish is very hard on line. I'm constantly dragging it on pilings and I'm also using it to fish for wipers and largemouth, and a big fish can stretch that line beyond it's recovery point even if it doesn't break. So I change out from the backing forward a couple of times a season on the tackle I use most, but sometimes I'll find my line has taken a set and coils or twist (or both) are a problem.

I usually only discover these problems when I'm fishing. I've found it helps, if your line is dry, to let it soak up some water. I tie on a ball-bearing snap-swivel and attach a small bell sinker with just enough weight for casting distance. I cast as far as I can and point the rod tip down, forcing the line under the water. If I have the patience I'll let the line sit and soak for a couple of minutes. Then I'll reel in slowly and apply tension to the line by lightly pinching it with my towel (ok, it's a t-shirt rag). Try pinching in front of the first line guide to hold your place with the butt of the rod against your body. This will also help untwist the line if that's a problem (the ball-bearing swivel helps) and cleans any crud that's sticking to you line. (I find a lot of stained water and that stuff is definitely on your line and in your reel.

I repeat the process until the line loosens up. Or it doesn't, and I just do something else. But unless the line is really bad you can usually make it usable for the day.

CrappiePappy
04-07-2015, 03:36 PM
Thanks for the equipment tips. I mostly use ultra and light tackle and flexible, low memory line really helps. Memory coils, stiff line and line twist can ruin your day, especially with light tackle.

I've been looking at the Pflueger Arbors, specifically because of the large diameter spool. Have you used them? I'd be very interested in your opinion on them.

The way I fish is very hard on line. I'm constantly dragging it on pilings and I'm also using it to fish for wipers and largemouth, and a big fish can stretch that line beyond it's recovery point even if it doesn't break. So I change out from the backing forward a couple of times a season on the tackle I use most, but sometimes I'll find my line has taken a set and coils or twist (or both) are a problem.

I usually only discover these problems when I'm fishing. I've found it helps, if your line is dry, to let it soak up some water. I tie on a ball-bearing snap-swivel and attach a small bell sinker with just enough weight for casting distance. I cast as far as I can and point the rod tip down, forcing the line under the water. If I have the patience I'll let the line sit and soak for a couple of minutes. Then I'll reel in slowly and apply tension to the line by lightly pinching it with my towel (ok, it's a t-shirt rag). Try pinching in front of the first line guide to hold your place with the butt of the rod against your body. This will also help untwist the line if that's a problem (the ball-bearing swivel helps) and cleans any crud that's sticking to you line. (I find a lot of stained water and that stuff is definitely on your line and in your reel.

I repeat the process until the line loosens up. Or it doesn't, and I just do something else. But unless the line is really bad you can usually make it usable for the day.

Sorry, no, I don't own any Pflueger reels.

I usually pre-stretch the line on my casting reels ... but, if/when twists occur while I'm fishing, I will drag the empty line behind the boat (at idle speed) to remove those twists. Or, if I happen to notice the twists beginning to occur while casting ... I do cast to open water & pinch the line between thumb & forefinger while reeling back in, and raise the rod high as the bait gets within a couple of yards of the boat ... and once the bait clears the water, allow it to spin out any twists, dipping the bait back into the water only long enough to slow the spin so it doesn't simply twist the line in the reverse direction.
And I also/always have back-up rods/reels that I can use in the event of catastrophic twists/coils, birdsnests (professional overruns), or any malfunction that may render that outfit useless or too time consuming to "fix" on the spot.

... cp :kewl

SpeckMaster
04-08-2015, 02:13 PM
Sorry, no, I don't own any Pflueger reels.

I usually pre-stretch the line on my casting reels ... but, if/when twists occur while I'm fishing, I will drag the empty line behind the boat (at idle speed) to remove those twists. Or, if I happen to notice the twists beginning to occur while casting ... I do cast to open water & pinch the line between thumb & forefinger while reeling back in, and raise the rod high as the bait gets within a couple of yards of the boat ... and once the bait clears the water, allow it to spin out any twists, dipping the bait back into the water only long enough to slow the spin so it doesn't simply twist the line in the reverse direction.
And I also/always have back-up rods/reels that I can use in the event of catastrophic twists/coils, birdsnests (professional overruns), or any malfunction that may render that outfit useless or too time consuming to "fix" on the spot.

... cp :kewl

I do a lot of shore fishing in spots that take some walking to get to so I tend to carry only the tackle I expect to use. That's usually 3 or 4 rigs so 1 breaking down isn't disastrous. I usually have backup tackle in the car but sometimes it's not practical to trek back. I change line out often enough that stiffened line usually isn't a problem. I stopped using braid on any reel that I don't have a backup spool of mono or flouro for because of impossible to fix on the spot tangles.

I developed that technique for untwisting line years and years ago when I only had one good ultralight rig and before I wised up and started carrying a little spool of fresh line in my tackle box. Took me a while to figure out it was easier to change line a couple of times a season than to mess with it when I could be fishing. Your way of watching the jig unwind is easier and for extra casting distance it would be easy to add a split shot.

jusanothajoe
04-08-2015, 06:51 PM
There was a problem with the Arbor reels, I had three and all of them an they had a clicking problem when reeled. Don't know if they got the problem fixed, but the factory sent me supremes instead and They are good reels. The factory said all the arbors they had did have same problem

SpeckMaster
04-08-2015, 11:02 PM
There was a problem with the Arbor reels, I had three and all of them an they had a clicking problem when reeled. Don't know if they got the problem fixed, but the factory sent me supremes instead and They are good reels. The factory said all the arbors they had did have same problem

Thanks for the heads up. I'll keep that in mind. I have an order to pick up at Cabela's and was going to give them a look while I was there. I'll ask the guys at the reel counter about them and that problem in particular.

I've had good experience with Pfluegers generally and was thinking the smallest Arbor might be a good choice for a lighter weight reel that could handle heavier line with fewer memory coil issues than smaller diameter spool designs.