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slimecoat
11-08-2006, 08:11 AM
Its not uncommon for me to sit in one spot for six hours. Its also not uncommon for me to go home fishless! Is it worth it to sit in one proven spot all day or should I move around?The old timers around the lake tell me that its hit or miss and you just have to be there at that one magic hour. Is this true?

skiptomylu
11-08-2006, 08:15 AM
Move! If after a few minutes (say 15 minutes) and no bites, leave. You can always come back later if it's a spot you really like, but move. If crappie are there it should not take all that long to get a bite at least!

zappaf19
11-08-2006, 08:16 AM
I use my trolling motor to fish docks and structures. I move real slow. If I get one I hang out for 5 to 10 min. Then move on.
Bill

Tunica
11-08-2006, 08:26 AM
If they are there then 15 minutes or 20 should tell you. no bites no bumps I move

DRPEPPER
11-08-2006, 08:37 AM
I am often hard headed about my favorite spot. A lot of times though, I move around a little and come back to it and catch fish.
DP

Slab Hunter
11-08-2006, 08:49 AM
Its not uncommon for me to sit in one spot for six hours. Its also not uncommon for me to go home fishless! Is it worth it to sit in one proven spot all day or should I move around?The old timers around the lake tell me that its hit or miss and you just have to be there at that one magic hour. Is this true?


Give up? NEVER

Man don't give up, just remember what didn't work and learn from there.

Don't give up! :(

Randy

Backlash
11-08-2006, 08:52 AM
Generally after 30-45 minutes with nothing I'm gone.

crappieseeker
11-08-2006, 08:59 AM
This is a good question. I will tell you what I've experienced in the past. I remember one morning when it was very cold. Me and a friend were fishing a spot that I had been catching fish from. I had caught several the day before. I knew the fish were there and I was getting disgusted. Most of the time if there are fish there, I will catch them or atleast a few. We had fished for a couple hours and he wanted to move. I told him lets wait them out a little longer. We did and we ended up with 50 nice slabs. I remember another time when there were alot of leaves on the water and I couldnt fish my jig the way I wanted and after a couple hours I caught close to 100, I dont know if it was because they were not biting yet or because when I started catching them the leaves had moved out with the current. There have been other times when this has happened also. Now for the downside, I have hung on to a place for so long that it didnt leave time to fish anywhere else and I ended up with just a couple fish because I waited out a spot too long. So sometimes its very worth it to stay and sometimes its a waste of time. You just gotta determine what the circumstances are for you.

Barnacle Bill
11-08-2006, 09:05 AM
Thats why I like slow trolling. If I find an area they are biting I keep trolling thru it until they stop, then move on.

skiptomylu
11-08-2006, 09:14 AM
Forgot a couple of things about this...

First if you are fishing jigs they should hit pretty fast, but minnows maybe longer. Also you can always come back.

Also at night I wait them out and usually they take a hour or two to start biting after we set up for night fishing. At night if for some reason I do move it will only be one time as it's a pain to move and set up again, besides after a couple of hours you move and give the new spot a couple of hours, I am done!

I also agree with IBNFISHN about the trolling as that is what I do 95% of the time in the spring and fall.

slimecoat
11-08-2006, 09:17 AM
This is good news. I really go nuts sitting in one spot for hours on end. I get a strange look on my face and everyone moves out of my way when they see me!

cfh
11-08-2006, 10:47 AM
I mostly fish with minnows, so I'll stay longer in one spot than I would if I fish with a jig. And sometimes I stay because I'm just relaxing and enjoying being outdoors doing what I enjoy. At these times I don't care if I catch anything or not.

CrappiePappy
11-08-2006, 12:27 PM
on the "fish" .... but, I will give up on a "spot", if I'm not getting bites within a 30min period. But, that's mostly when casting jigs. When dock shooting, I'm reasonably sure after about a dozen casts ...no fish, I move on to the next most promising looking dock. Casting to standing, fallen, or submerged timber .... I'll give a spot a thorough working over, for 30mins, and if no action ... I'm outta there. Minnow fishing while "tied up" to a tree ... no more than 1hr, if I'm getting bites, and no more than 30mins if not.
Mostly I go by "past experiences", considering all the factors (time of day, lake, water conditons, weather, season, type of cover, most effective method for said conditions, recent & reputable reports, etc) ... and start with the cover, depth, presentation, and method that has proven successful in the past (under those conditions). I move around alot, until I find a working pattern. Once having found that, I utilize any and all similar cover ... but, I don't hang around a spot, for long, if no action is forthcoming. I just move on to the next closest similar spot, and check it out. If I am still not locating fish .... I'll start experimenting - changing depth, retrieve speed, method, bait, color, cover type, etc.
Most lakes, that I fish often, I have "milk runs" that I follow .... but, I'm also always on the lookout for "new" spots -- especially if they are similar in nature to "proven" spots. .......... luck2ya ....... cp :cool:

Darryl Morris
11-08-2006, 02:24 PM
NO, NO, NO -- If they don't play, we don't stay. Have a whole portfolio of spots shallow, mid-range and deep. Run and gun till you find the pattern for that day and then hit all your spots with that pattern. If they shut down on you, find the new pattern and do it all over again.

Here's the result of today's (Nov. 8, 2006) 6 hours of fishing on 15 different spots, but only caught fish on 6 of them:

http://www.familyfishingtrips.com/images/061108.jpg

GRIZZ
11-08-2006, 02:34 PM
I suppose it depends if you know that there are fish there or not. I agree with the opinions posted before me that most of the time its better to hit a spot and move on but also keep in mind that if you know for sure there are fish there sometimes you can fish a spot you know contains fish for a while and get nothing and the fish will turn on for 30 mins and you kill for that time then they will turn off again. For that reason I think sometimes it pays to sit on a spot even when your not hitting them. It works that way with walleyes all the time, but for the most part it pays to move around and then come back. Keep in mind that many fishermen here fish reservoirs and not natural lakes much. There is quite a bit of difference in crappie fishing in the two. I personally find much larger schools in natural lakes and tend to sit on a spot till they turn on especially fishing large weedbeds like in Chautauqua where I live. I find reservours more difficult to locate fish on, so moving might be more productive there. In natural lakes there is stucture almost everywhere and therefore crappies are almost everywhere too.

Just my 2 cents.

BigPaul
11-08-2006, 04:18 PM
Thats why I like slow trolling. If I find an area they are biting I keep trolling thru it until they stop, then move on.

yup, that's the best way ... keep moving till you find 'em! :D

crappieseeker
11-08-2006, 05:52 PM
I saw where a few people said they move quicker if they are jig fishing rather than minnow fishing. I mostly jig fish, so if I trust a spot, I dont move based on what I'm fishing with. I do however take water movement into consideration also. Sometimes the fish bite in reaction to the way the water is moving, whether it is rising or falling. Sometimes they bite one way and not the other. Therefore if the water is continuously moving in the wrong direction I will either leave or move and try different tactics in the river where there are current breaks or areas where the water changes direction due to structure or power plants and so forth.

Jerry Blake
11-08-2006, 07:24 PM
It depends a lot on what I'm seeing on the graph, how big the condo is and how much of a depth change it is on. If I'm marking a lot of fish at a lot of different depths on my graphs I'll stick around a little while trying different depths on different areas of the condo to see if I can locate some feeding crappie. But if we're not getting any bites at all, especially if they aren't showing up very well on my graphs I won't be on a condo more than 10 or 15-minutes.

I have a 5-minute rule: If we've been fishing a condo for 10 or 15-minutes without a bite, even if we've already caught some fish there, I give them a "Five Minute Warning".

After a few minutes I give them "Last Call". Yep I actually talk to the fish - out loud - go on to tell them that we have other fish to fry, we can come back later to check on them and we think the crappie in another area will be more appreciative of our efforts, etc.

Then I start getting ready to move - pick up my buoy markers and close my tackle box, etc. and raise my trolling motor. You would be surprised how many times we get a bite when they are in their Five Minute Warning.

Of course, if we catch a fish or at least get a good bite we'll give them a five-minute extension but if we make it through the Five Minute Warning and Last Call without a bite we move on. I don't actually time it - just estimate it.

This lets my clients know that we're not going to sit there much longer unless we're catching fish and it also keeps me from wasting too much time in an unproductive area.

crappiechaser2
11-08-2006, 08:43 PM
Hey Jerry, I have been reading this post and learning a lot. I have a couple of questions. When you start out in the morning, do you know exactly where you are going to start fishing? Do you rig up the poles before you leave the dock? And opps, this is 3 questions, what exactly happens for you to decide you have a definite "pattern"?

Jerry Blake
11-08-2006, 09:22 PM
Hey CC2:

I never decide where I am going to start fishing until I push off from the bank after sizing up my crew, the weather (primarily wind but also this time of year, how cold it is and how well my crew is prepared for a chilly boat ride) and any changes in water level.

I usually have a few spots in mind depending on what we did the day before or the last time we were on the lake but I never have a "milk run" or specific route I plan to fish. Occasionally I'll ask my crew whether they want to go for size or numbers and take that into consideration but only if we've been consistently doing better on size in one area and better on numbers in another.

We fish minnows under slip floats most of the time, keeping the minnow poles in rod holders and often also fish jigs straight down with pole-in-hand while we keep an eye on the floats. So there isn't much set-up to do before we leave the boat ramp other than getting the rods out. I keep them put together and stored in horizontal rod holders on the sides of the boat. It only takes a couple seconds to change the depth of our bobber stoppers when we pull up to a condo and decide what depths to start fishing.

When we find quality fish at certain depths we keep fishing condos that are in the same depth range in that part of the lake. I think too many folks get hung up on fishing a certain depth or depth range at a certain time of year or after hearing a fishing report. Yes, it is critical to fish at the right depth range for the fish on a perticular condo or area but the "right depth" could be completely different in another area of the lake. We usually keep our bait at a variety of at least a foot or two depth differance unless they are only hitting the bait at one specific depth. Often times we can move a little bit deeper after the action slows and pick up a few more fish before leaving an area.

For the last several weeks we have been catching fish from as shallow as 6 or 7 feet to as deep as 20 to 22-feet deep depending on the area we are fishing. The bigger fish have been coming from the deeper areas close to or right on the main channel and the better numbers but smaller fish are up the creek arms in much shallower water. They are still relating to points and creek channel drop-offs but not nearly as deep. When the water cools off a few degrees we start seeing better fish moving shallower but if remains stable or warms up a few degrees the bigger fish seem to move back to deeper water.

Crappie seem to be on the move a lot more in the spring and fall than summer and winter. Sometimes we can wear them out on the same condo for several days in a row and other times they will be covering the graph screen on a condo one day on gone the next.

So, it's a bit of a crapshoot. Usually even if we are catching good numbers of fish that are running a bit small and we’ve got a decent mess in the box we'll go try a another area to see if we can find some better fish that are willing to "go for a boat ride".

Cane Pole
11-08-2006, 09:38 PM
Quote Jerry

I never decide where I am going to start fishing until I push off from the bank .

Sign of a good fisherman.

I usually say, "let's go try here first" and I am usually wrong...haha

crappiechaser2
11-08-2006, 10:13 PM
Thanks for the information Jerry. It makes me feel better knowing you are catching them on minnows and bobbers. That is my choice, but I thought you had to go "high tech" to really catch'em. Also knowing that even you as a professional leaves the dock not knowing exactly where you are going to fish. I guess I am making it too difficult. LOL Thanks again.

Jerry Blake
11-08-2006, 10:25 PM
Thanks for the information Jerry. It makes me feel better knowing you are catching them on minnows and bobbers. That is my choice, but I thought you had to go "high tech" to really catch'em. Also knowing that even you as a professional leaves the dock not knowing exactly where you are going to fish. I guess I am making it too difficult. LOL Thanks again.

Hey CC2:

I love to catch them on jigs - I'm hooked on the THUMP - but day in and day out small minnows are the most dependable bait I've found and the easiest to use for my clients. I don't get hung up on the jig vs. minnow debate - I offer them both and let the crappie pick what they want. This morning Jim and I each fished one minnow pole and one jig pole and probably got half of our fish on each.

Slablicious
11-09-2006, 01:37 AM
After 30 min. and no bite, I'm moving. Crappie bite if crappie see.

matt s.
11-09-2006, 01:46 AM
I'll stick around for about an hour or two and try different presentations...if nothing bites yet i'll move.