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jhill10
02-11-2014, 06:06 AM
I until recently thought that all boats drifted sideways when the wind blew them across the lake. Like you see cat fisherman do. Fishing out of one side of the boat. But now ive noticed there are plenty of boats out there that drift straight forward. Bow facing down wind. Not using any chains or drift socks or anything. Easily staying straight fishing out each side of the boat. Or the back. As they drift along with lines behind the boat. . . . . .my question. Is. How do you know if a boat drifts that way before you purchase one. Is it hull shape? Weight of boat? Weight distribution of gear? Thanks

skeetbum
02-11-2014, 07:21 AM
The outboard set straight ahead will help a heavier boat drift straight downwind. I have turned the outboard all the way left or right and stayed sideways through the drift. Lighter boats may be affected differently, and I'm sure someone will weigh in with those opinions.

DrNip
02-11-2014, 07:33 AM
What type of boat do you have along with it's weight?

NIMROD
02-11-2014, 09:16 AM
I favor a boat with lower sides because the higher sides means more area to allow wind to push your boat. Like it was said keep outboard motor down and set straight. Trolling motor can be used to maintain proper drift direction. I remember a fishing show where a guide side trolled and want to say it was Roger Gant ?

http://www.ddoutdoor.com/home/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=17:side-pullin-grenada-with-roger-gant&catid=2:mc-content&Itemid=3

jhill10
02-11-2014, 09:53 AM
Thanks guys. Not quite what I'm after. I'm trying to find if there is a way you can tell how a boat is gonna drift before putting it on the water. Now my current boat is a light aluminum v bottom. Drifts sideways naturally. Now I try to drift straight sometimes with sock out the back. And keep my outboard straight. But it still tries to kick sideways. Now I was in a bass boat and it drifted straight naturally. And so did my buddys flat bottom john. What is the difference in these boats to make em different? I could understand mine and my buddys john boat would drift the same. And the bass boat be different. But its not. And most other john boats I've been in drift sideways. That's what I'm wondering when I go to buy a new boat. Will it drift straight or sideways?

Kman
02-11-2014, 12:15 PM
You are chasing an anomaly, no boat naturally drifts in a straight line...its physically impossible. What you witnessed "that day" or whenever you saw it, wasn't what you thought it was, the wind conditions were different, the outboard was down tracking it straight, it was loaded differently, SOMETHING was causing that. It wasn't the boat. Especially a FLAT boat...that's why they make trolling motors, drift socks, chain drags, and all that other stuff, no boat will just put its nose down wind and drift straight. They all need a little help from one of the things mentioned earlier. Physics is a you know what...cant get around it.

captankangaroo
02-11-2014, 12:33 PM
A lot of how boats drift has to do with draft vs sail area. the sides of some, the bow is higher then stern. The stern is usually heaver then the bow. On windy days it should travel more stern to seas. On a calm day with current it most likely will drift side ways or bow to current. Smaller boats are affected by draft easier then bigger boats, i.e. more people and gear and how they are placed will have a different affect on it. bigger boats may not be affected as much. So even if you test it first it may not be the same after you rig it out. My boat has a t top and rides stern to in any wind, no wind side to. Bottom line there are a lot of factors that apply so looking at a boat is any ones guess. Go for a ride is best. hope this helps.

jhill10
02-11-2014, 05:22 PM
That's what I thought until last year I spent a week fishing out of my uncles triton bass boat. And wen we set up to drift the first day. I was running the boat and had to fight to keep the boat sideways. So I said screw it and sat down next to him. Him in the drivers seat and me next to him in the passenger seat. Holding our poles out our sides. And drifted like that all week. I was amazed myself. I drift most every time I fish whether it be for crappie walleye or catfish. So I'm familiar with how things should work. Just didn't know y it was doing wat it did. Maybe low sided boat with a low sitting rear and a high sitting front would cause that.

sky hawk
02-11-2014, 07:17 PM
I'm no engineer, but I believe a low/heavy stern and a high/light bow will cause the bow to swing downwind every time. Just like a weathervane.

Tracker123
02-11-2014, 07:59 PM
You are chasing an anomaly, no boat naturally drifts in a straight line...its physically impossible. What you witnessed "that day" or whenever you saw it, wasn't what you thought it was, the wind conditions were different, the outboard was down tracking it straight, it was loaded differently, SOMETHING was causing that. It wasn't the boat. Especially a FLAT boat...that's why they make trolling motors, drift socks, chain drags, and all that other stuff, no boat will just put its nose down wind and drift straight. They all need a little help from one of the things mentioned earlier. Physics is a you know what...cant get around it.

Exactly.

Bronson
02-17-2014, 05:14 PM
I remember a fishing show where a guide side trolled and want to say it was Roger Gant ?

You're exactly right. Roger Gant used to do some fishing shows with Bill Dance. There are a lot of fishermen who use it around Paris Landing an absolutely "kill" the fish. Met one guy in the parking lot who was taking out and said he drifted across a stump field and had 6 out of 7 poles go down at the same time. Seems like most of the ones I spoke with were using road runners. I think it's important to note most of them are making a controlled drift over areas they know should hold fish. A drift sock might help keep you straight and allow you to slow down.