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shipahoy41
01-09-2014, 05:43 PM
Has anyone ever used this stuff for their boat motors? How did you use it? What were the results? Thanks for all the help.

Mike

SeaRay
01-09-2014, 05:47 PM
I use it because every comment I have seen on it says it is the best thing ever for cleaning fuel systems and improving performance. I thought it would replace Stabil as a stabilizer but I have since learned you need both, One for cleaning and one for stabilizing and protecting against ethanol, if you buy that kind of gas. So far, I've only run non-ethanol, but you never know for sure what you are getting.
My outboards are old, so I need all the help I can get.

10point
01-09-2014, 05:59 PM
I put an ounce into every gallon but I don't use much gas as I only have a 9.9. I started using it after reading about he great it was on duckhunter.net

"G"
01-09-2014, 06:06 PM
Its not a engine treatment Mike.....Its a fuel treatment that helps keep the fuel system clean. Its good stuff, been around for years.

jimfish
01-09-2014, 06:19 PM
Has saved me a couple of pieces of lawn equip. that I thought was gone ran some sea foam and they have been running every since great stuff.

earl 1234
01-09-2014, 06:19 PM
I use it in my boat every tank . Also use it in my truck about 2 or 3 times a year . I use gas station gas in the boat .

Cray
01-09-2014, 06:53 PM
Mike, it cuts the varnish out of cab,fuel pump and anywhere gas may sit. If you have never run it dose that new motor up pretty good with it and run the snot out of it. Leave it sit in carbs a few days then run it again. Then just add a couple of ounces every time you fill up. Also good to add some Marine Stabil every fill up. Check your motor for a filter under the cowel. If it dosent have one you need to add one between tank and carbs.

shipahoy41
01-09-2014, 07:16 PM
Mike, it cuts the varnish out of cab,fuel pump and anywhere gas may sit. If you have never run it dose that new motor up pretty good with it and run the snot out of it. Leave it sit in carbs a few days then run it again. Then just add a couple of ounces every time you fill up. Also good to add some Marine Stabil every fill up. Check your motor for a filter under the cowel. If it dosent have one you need to add one between tank and carbs.

I have Stabil for the tractor. Is that different from marine stabil?

SeaRay
01-09-2014, 07:24 PM
Yes the marine stabil is formulated a bit differently for outboard and marine applications. I happend on a TV show where they were discussing the Stabil products. Up til then I figured they were the same. Won't hurt to use the regular, the marine is just tweaked a little more toward boat appications.

papasage
01-09-2014, 07:32 PM
older motor that has never ben cleaned . you can flood them out through the carb. and then pull plugs spray the cylinders with it let it sit over night then run it on a hose muff or in a tank .then run it on the water WOT till it warms up then change plugs and you are ready for the water . do not run in driver way on muffs . the wife will be on you bad time

magnum500
01-09-2014, 08:00 PM
I use it in my chainsaws, string trimmers, lawnmowers.....well everything that runs on gas. Have been using it for years. It makes everything run better.

l_tedford
01-09-2014, 08:32 PM
I use it in all motors. Cleans them really well. You can put it in the gas tank or pull a vacuum hose and pour it in.

camo
01-09-2014, 08:34 PM
I get the spray can and take the cylinder cover off and hook up the muffs spray heavy into each cyl.turn off motor let set for awhile,then run your motor. smokes like crazy but it works

shipahoy41
01-10-2014, 07:10 AM
You have all managed to convince me to give it a try. I went to Autozone and picked up a couple of cans to put into the fuel. Thanks.

147406

"G"
01-10-2014, 07:21 AM
Mike you need to mix Marine Stabil in your fuel at the reccomended rate everytime you add fuel. I also suggest that your buy and install a water separator filter and change the spin on filter on it once a year.

shipahoy41
01-10-2014, 07:31 AM
Mike you need to mix Marine Stabil in your fuel at the reccomended rate everytime you add fuel. I also suggest that your buy and install a water separator filter and change the spin on filter on it once a year.

ok. PM or post what a water seperator and a spin filter is because I am NOT MECHANICALLY INCLINED at all. How do you install it or should I take the boat to a marina? What is it's function? DO I mix the marine stabile as well as the Sea Foam into the fuel? I hope I am not the only one on www.crappie.com who has NO CLUE about these things. Perhaps this thread will help others as well. Thanks. Mike

"G"
01-10-2014, 07:47 AM
You can use the sea foam and the marine stabil together. But I just just the marine stabil all the time and I put sea foam in in the early spring when I start useing the boat again just to clean it up good. The water separator filter catches the water that you get from ethanol gas which absorbs moisture and akso any from fuel tank sweating. The filter has a base that mounts in your rear compartment on your boat where the gas tank is. You have to cut your fuel line that runs from your tank to the motor and conect to the filter base. Filter screws onto the base. Filter kit comes without hose barb fitting so you will have to buy two fittings and clamps to conect your fuel lines to it. Filter and base assy is about 50 bucks at boat shop....pluse labor to install. I got mine at walmart for 25 bucks and installed myself. Just follow the directions that come with it.

CrappiePappy
01-10-2014, 08:05 AM
Here ya go, Ship :

http://www.boatingmag.com/maintenance/diy-projects/installing-fuelwater-separator

http://www.moellermarine.com/aftermarket/fuel_systems/fuel_filters/

Best case scenario is you can mount the separator between the gas tank & bulb, and only have to cut the fuel line & attach it to the separator. Worse case scenario is you have to move things around, and/or get a longer fuel line, and "make it fit" your boat's bilge area.

I've got one, but haven't gotten around to putting it on, yet ... as my boat presents a possible "worst case scenario". :Doh:

I have the Moeller Clear Site (#33314-10) 10micron system ... and it's much bigger, in real life, than what the pictures online would indicate. It's almost 10" tall & 5" wide. I researched & went with this one for my 90HP Merc 2strk.

Looks like this :

http://thumbs3.ebaystatic.com/d/l225/m/miw98asrmL9jCyaWA-7TeUA.jpg

.... cp :kewl

shipahoy41
01-10-2014, 08:07 AM
Ok. Thanks again David and Pappy.

Gindog
01-10-2014, 12:34 PM
I have a inline filter in my fuel line and I do run a oz in my 6 gal tank when I put gas in it I put another oz

Handicrappie
01-10-2014, 01:50 PM
Mike you need to mix Marine Stabil in your fuel at the reccomended rate everytime you add fuel. I also suggest that your buy and install a water separator filter and change the spin on filter on it once a year.

Seafoam performs the same duties as Marine Stabil. There is no reason to run both unless you want to. Here is information directly from their site. It stabilizes fuel for up to 2 years and controls moisture buildup. I run a whole can of it every fill up. Got the seafoam in a case from amazon and only paid about 6 a can for it. Its some good stuff!!!147427147428

brushnjigs
01-10-2014, 02:35 PM
Has anyone ever used this stuff for their boat motors? How did you use it? What were the results? Thanks for all the help.

Mike

Mike, I wouldn't even think of running anything gas powered with out it. Lawnmower,chain saw, snow blower, they all get it. Everything but the truck.
Changed the head gaskets on the outboard and the heads and cylinders were shiny clean. My mechanic said thats the way I like to see them. I have used it for years now.

crappiewisdom
01-10-2014, 03:43 PM
I have wondered the same.

I have a 2 stroke Yamaha 90 horse on my boat. I am definitely not a mechanic. I was using Yamaha Ring Free, Stabil, and Seafoam. My boat mechanic said to just use Stabil. So that's what I do and have not had any problems. I did put on a fuel/water separator and put it on myself....not very hard to do. I do use gas with ethanol, since ethanol free gas is hard to find around here.

Don't know if this helps...

"G"
01-10-2014, 03:51 PM
I have read that and heard all that Handi. But I have been useing bothe products for y ears and I just think Stabil does a better job of stabilizing fuel and Seafoam does a better job of cleaning. Anyway thats what works for me. I use a lot of each here on the farm.

Barnacle Bill
01-10-2014, 04:02 PM
I have been using just Sea Foam in all my motors every since this area went to all E-10 at the stations. Zero problems and this has been over 15 years now.

Handicrappie
01-10-2014, 04:21 PM
I have read that and heard all that Handi. But I have been useing bothe products for y ears and I just think Stabil does a better job of stabilizing fuel and Seafoam does a better job of cleaning. Anyway thats what works for me. I use a lot of each here on the farm.

It cant hurt to use both but I dont think its necessary. Only time will tell but im going on 18 months of only seafoam and my motor has never ran or acted better. This was after I had my fuel line replaced and carbs cleaned from ethanol damage over a 6 year period but the gas was not properly treated over that period. I do use a whole can everytime I fill up and that is usually only 10 to 12 gallons but they say you cant use to much of either the seafoam or stabil.

wigglewart
01-10-2014, 08:32 PM
Sea foam is a great product, I use it in my lawnmower, leaf blower and chainsaws. For what it's worth my marine service center does not recommend it for EFI motors he said it would breakdown the o-rings over time. Best to use stable to treat fuel.

shipahoy41
01-11-2014, 06:56 AM
Wigglewart, all the people here on c.com have taught an old dog a new trick. I am willing to give it a try in my own tractor, leaf blower, trimmer and also in the boat motor. They all have to perform better than they did last year in spite of all new spark plugs. Again, I thank all of you who posted on this thread to advise and help the old man out.

Don G
01-11-2014, 09:18 AM
Wigglewart, all the people here on c.com have taught an old dog a new trick. I am willing to give it a try in my own tractor, leaf blower, trimmer and also in the boat motor. They all have to perform better than they did last year in spite of all new spark plugs. Again, I thank all of you who posted on this thread to advise and help the old man out.

Ship, some great info here. Don't forget the water separator. Very, very important

Barnacle Bill
01-11-2014, 09:43 AM
Ship, some great info here. Don't forget the water separator. Very, very important

Yes it is.

shipahoy41
01-11-2014, 10:24 AM
Ship, some great info here. Don't forget the water separator. Very, very important

Thanks Don. You woukd think the water separators came with the fully rigged bass boats. I will check mine out on Monday.

"G"
01-11-2014, 10:30 AM
Ship.....most but not all of the new boats come with them. The older boats do not have them unless someone added it on. With todays ethanol gas it is very important to have one.

shipahoy41
01-11-2014, 11:06 AM
Ship.....most but not all of the new boats come with them. The older boats do not have them unless someone added it on. With todays ethanol gas it is very important to have one.

Mine is a 1981 Venture Bass Boat.

shipahoy41
01-11-2014, 11:08 AM
147544

This is it.

skeetbum
01-11-2014, 09:39 PM
I was introduced to Seafoam through my marine mechanic in Florida name of Bill Yates. Small shop with a strong following because he didn't waste his time or your money. He told me of his introduction to it and it went something like this; He was brought a 20hp tiller handle Mercury that and older gent liked to slow troll with. It just wouldn't behave, running rough and cutting out. Bill was the second tech to try and solve the problem. With the owners blessing he went through the carbs, twice, and the ignition system from top to bottom, changed nothing. One of the fellas that hung around from time to time came in and after learning of all the head scratching going on, he went to the parts house and came back with a can. Doing the choke and soak thing, Bill let it sit for a few hours while he tended another motor. He added some more fuel to keep the mix strong and fired it up in the test tank. He had to back away from the tank for all the smoke and black soot coming out of it, and had to change the water when finished. Seems the trolling had built up carbon and ash deposits and wouldn't let the motor breathe as it should. The motor went back to purring as it had before and the man paid his bill with a big smile. I don't use it every tank but run a can every few months in about a half tank of fuel and have no fuel related problems. I do run Marine Stabil religiously with every tank. My Jimmy's intake gaskets failed in a water jacket and the Nephew changed them. When he lifted the intake off and turned it over he couldn't believe what he was seeing and asked how I kept the injectors so clean. Motor had 153,000 and they were perfect. Stuff was developed in the 40's for marine applications and after talking to every mechanic I could find I have yet to hear a bad word about it, and that in itself speaks volumes. I'm as sold as I could be on the product. Like your new boat Mike, looks like a charm. Good luck with it.

Barnacle Bill
01-11-2014, 10:54 PM
Skeetbum's post reminded me that I have (somewhere) the procedures for doing a de-carb using Sea Foam. It does an excellent job when done right. When a motor is left sitting and not ran for a very long time it is fairly common for 1 cylinder to have low compression. This would be the one at the top of it's stroke and rings will stick from carbon and being compressed for a long period. I have seen this stuff free the rings and restore compression. It can get very messy from cleaning the motor out and is not something you would want to do on a nice clean driveway.

shipahoy41
01-12-2014, 08:26 AM
I was introduced to Seafoam through my marine mechanic in Florida name of Bill Yates. Small shop with a strong following because he didn't waste his time or your money. He told me of his introduction to it and it went something like this; He was brought a 20hp tiller handle Mercury that and older gent liked to slow troll with. It just wouldn't behave, running rough and cutting out. Bill was the second tech to try and solve the problem. With the owners blessing he went through the carbs, twice, and the ignition system from top to bottom, changed nothing. One of the fellas that hung around from time to time came in and after learning of all the head scratching going on, he went to the parts house and came back with a can. Doing the choke and soak thing, Bill let it sit for a few hours while he tended another motor. He added some more fuel to keep the mix strong and fired it up in the test tank. He had to back away from the tank for all the smoke and black soot coming out of it, and had to change the water when finished. Seems the trolling had built up carbon and ash deposits and wouldn't let the motor breathe as it should. The motor went back to purring as it had before and the man paid his bill with a big smile. I don't use it every tank but run a can every few months in about a half tank of fuel and have no fuel related problems. I do run Marine Stabil religiously with every tank. My Jimmy's intake gaskets failed in a water jacket and the Nephew changed them. When he lifted the intake off and turned it over he couldn't believe what he was seeing and asked how I kept the injectors so clean. Motor had 153,000 and they were perfect. Stuff was developed in the 40's for marine applications and after talking to every mechanic I could find I have yet to hear a bad word about it, and that in itself speaks volumes. I'm as sold as I could be on the product. Like your new boat Mike, looks like a charm. Good luck with it.

Thank you my friend. It has a 90hp on the rear end.
147636

shipahoy41
01-12-2014, 08:28 AM
Skeetbum's post reminded me that I have (somewhere) the procedures for doing a de-carb using Sea Foam. It does an excellent job when done right. When a motor is left sitting and not ran for a very long time it is fairly common for 1 cylinder to have low compression. This would be the one at the top of it's stroke and rings will stick from carbon and being compressed for a long period. I have seen this stuff free the rings and restore compression. It can get very messy from cleaning the motor out and is not something you would want to do on a nice clean driveway.

You are the first one to say "Don't do this on the driveway." I appreciate that tidbit of information. I guess I will just have to mess up the back yard. LOL

Barnacle Bill
01-12-2014, 08:55 AM
You are the first one to say "Don't do this on the driveway." I appreciate that tidbit of information. I guess I will just have to mess up the back yard. LOL

In case you don't have it, here is the procedure I use to use when I was working on motors.
http://forums.iboats.com/engine-frequently-asked-questions-faq/decarbing-faq-158076.html

Scrapper
01-12-2014, 04:21 PM
+1 on everything said. Seafoam goes in everything I own. Do the decarb procedure mentioned. Its the best way and what I have always done. I bought a small jug for just seafoam decarb procedures.

There is another product that was mentioned earlier. Seafoam Deepcreep, it is a penetrating oil by nature. But is used the same way seafoam is used, just in aerosol form. Pull plugs and spray in, let set overnight...will loosen all the carbon from your rings and combustion chamber.

Like Bill said...NOT in driveway....or around any houses or people. It will SMOKE....ALOT...and leave a trail of black gunk.

One other thing...when doing any decarb on a boat motor...the chance is always there to foul a plug. Have a set with you when you do the decarb. That way you have them if needed. If you dont' foul any and they have any age on them I would go ahead and replace after the decarb. I always made a point to do this after the full on decarb.

Another tidbit...you can use it the same way in your vehicle. Ecspecially if you run an older carb or throttle body injected engine. Carb engines will surprise you at the gunk that comes out...due to the fact they never hold their mixtures right...and are normally not touched enough. Pull the Big vacuum tube off the brake booster. This is the big round thing on the firewall that attaches to the master cylinder..where you add brake fluid. With engine running you'll feel a vacuum (sucking) from hose...that leads right into the intake manifold. Slowly pour seafoam into that hose with engine running until it nearly dies...have engine warm when you do this. Allow to sit for 15 minutes...then drive the hound out of it. Do this a few times, put the rest in the tank if you have any left. You'll clean your intake, valves, pistons, combustion chamber and such. Normally add some milage back if its down.

Point being...you didn't go wrong buying it...nor will you ever go wrong using it. Great stuff!

shipahoy41
01-12-2014, 10:13 PM
There is a ton of great information in this thread. Honestly, I had no idea of what to do. I was just going to put half the can into the fuel tank, put some muffs on the motor, turn on the hose and then crank the engine. I am reading all of this thread again before I do anything. C.com people are the best and I appreciate you all.

skeetbum
01-12-2014, 10:32 PM
Knowledge kept to ones self is not only greedy but of limited value.

Redge
01-12-2014, 10:37 PM
Skeetbum those are some nice words right there!

shipahoy41
01-13-2014, 07:19 AM
This is what Barnacle Bill Referenced in the link. "Since this pops up every other day on some board, try this method, I picked it up on another board and have been using it for awhile now,works great.
Tip for the Week
Do-It-Yourself Engine Tip; A Simple and Cost Effective Way to De-Carbon an Outboard
By Capt. Bob Dunkelberger
This works for Carbed, EFI, Ficht, HPDI, Opti-max and even 4-strokes... and should be administered after every 50-60 hours of use.
First you need a separate small fuel tank. One of those 3-gallon red Tempos works well or an empty gallon milk jug in a pinch, but it might be a bit messier.
I use Seafoam over the OEM (original equipment manufacturer) stuff like OMC Engine Tuner or Mercury Power Tune. Note: in the last few years they changed the formula and you have to let them sit up 12 hours. Who's got time for that? Seafoam does the job in 15 minutes and can be purchased from NAPA, Car Quest or other auto stores.
You'll need 3/4 gallon of gasoline and one 16oz can of Seafoam for each engine. Don't forget to add 3oz of oil if you are pre-mixing in a carbed engine. Use a 3 ft piece of fuel hose off the small tank. Connect this tank to your engine by pulling off the main tank fuel hose from the intake side of your water separating fuel filter and plug the hose off the small tank onto that fitting. Or you can separate the fuel line on the tank side primer ball, so you can still use your primer. If your engine has a fuel plug then you will also need a fuel plug on the smaller tank's hose.
Start the engine, let it warm up and start pulling the mix into the engine. You may have to increase the idle to keep it running once she gets loaded with the Seafoam. Run the engine 15 minutes at the dock or just cruising around under 2500 rpm's. Then shut it down and let it sit for another 15 minutes.
Restart the engine; the smoke you see is the carbon burning off. Do the whole thing again and let her sit again for 15 more minutes. If she smokes after the second time do it again.
I've never seen one still smoke after three doses. (I bought a Bronco two years ago that had 95,000 miles on it. When I used Seafoam on it I had the neighbors hanging out of their front doors looking for where the fire was after I started it the first time there so much smoke)
The gallon mix should be just enough to do this 3 times. You don't need a wide-open throttle and you don't need to change the plugs. The plugs are cleaned at the same time as the combustion chambers. My suggestion is that every 50-60hrs is the optimal time to change plugs in most engines.
I cleaned an antique Evinrude once that had a 1/4" of solid carbon on the exhaust chamber walls by running a 1/2 gal of the aforementioned mix through it. Seafoam, a great product, has been around since the 1930's and it's what they used when they were burning straight 4 stroke 40SAE oils in outboards.
For you guys with the 4 stroke outboards? Those engines work 10 times as hard as any auto engine ever will and they too will carbon up. Too many are under the assumption that it's totally the 2 stroke oil that causes the carbon, Wrong... it's also the additives they put in the fuels today. The carbon inhibitors in 2-stroke oil are there for this reason also. Remember when gasoline used to smell like gasoline, today it smells more like bad cologne.
For those guys that like to work the carbon treatment by spraying it down the carbs, Seafoam also comes in spray can called Deep Creep. It's the same stuff under pressure and notes on the can, "Oxygen Sensor Safe". After that, if your engine manufacturer recommends a daily additive treatment then do so. The tank and hose are a one-time purchase and the Seafoam is only costs $5-6.00 per can. "

Bill, I am sure you have helped a ton of people today including me. I was just going to put 1/2 can into the boat gas, put on some muffs, and turn on the hose. After that, crank the engine. Told you I am a clutz an mechanics. LOL I intend to reread every word on this entire thread and then read it all again to try and get an understanding of it. Perhaps a monitor or Slab will archive this puppy.

shipahoy41
01-13-2014, 07:19 AM
This is what Barnacle Bill Referenced in the link. "Since this pops up every other day on some board, try this method, I picked it up on another board and have been using it for awhile now,works great.
Tip for the Week
Do-It-Yourself Engine Tip; A Simple and Cost Effective Way to De-Carbon an Outboard
By Capt. Bob Dunkelberger
This works for Carbed, EFI, Ficht, HPDI, Opti-max and even 4-strokes... and should be administered after every 50-60 hours of use.
First you need a separate small fuel tank. One of those 3-gallon red Tempos works well or an empty gallon milk jug in a pinch, but it might be a bit messier.
I use Seafoam over the OEM (original equipment manufacturer) stuff like OMC Engine Tuner or Mercury Power Tune. Note: in the last few years they changed the formula and you have to let them sit up 12 hours. Who's got time for that? Seafoam does the job in 15 minutes and can be purchased from NAPA, Car Quest or other auto stores.
You'll need 3/4 gallon of gasoline and one 16oz can of Seafoam for each engine. Don't forget to add 3oz of oil if you are pre-mixing in a carbed engine. Use a 3 ft piece of fuel hose off the small tank. Connect this tank to your engine by pulling off the main tank fuel hose from the intake side of your water separating fuel filter and plug the hose off the small tank onto that fitting. Or you can separate the fuel line on the tank side primer ball, so you can still use your primer. If your engine has a fuel plug then you will also need a fuel plug on the smaller tank's hose.
Start the engine, let it warm up and start pulling the mix into the engine. You may have to increase the idle to keep it running once she gets loaded with the Seafoam. Run the engine 15 minutes at the dock or just cruising around under 2500 rpm's. Then shut it down and let it sit for another 15 minutes.
Restart the engine; the smoke you see is the carbon burning off. Do the whole thing again and let her sit again for 15 more minutes. If she smokes after the second time do it again.
I've never seen one still smoke after three doses. (I bought a Bronco two years ago that had 95,000 miles on it. When I used Seafoam on it I had the neighbors hanging out of their front doors looking for where the fire was after I started it the first time there so much smoke)
The gallon mix should be just enough to do this 3 times. You don't need a wide-open throttle and you don't need to change the plugs. The plugs are cleaned at the same time as the combustion chambers. My suggestion is that every 50-60hrs is the optimal time to change plugs in most engines.
I cleaned an antique Evinrude once that had a 1/4" of solid carbon on the exhaust chamber walls by running a 1/2 gal of the aforementioned mix through it. Seafoam, a great product, has been around since the 1930's and it's what they used when they were burning straight 4 stroke 40SAE oils in outboards.
For you guys with the 4 stroke outboards? Those engines work 10 times as hard as any auto engine ever will and they too will carbon up. Too many are under the assumption that it's totally the 2 stroke oil that causes the carbon, Wrong... it's also the additives they put in the fuels today. The carbon inhibitors in 2-stroke oil are there for this reason also. Remember when gasoline used to smell like gasoline, today it smells more like bad cologne.
For those guys that like to work the carbon treatment by spraying it down the carbs, Seafoam also comes in spray can called Deep Creep. It's the same stuff under pressure and notes on the can, "Oxygen Sensor Safe". After that, if your engine manufacturer recommends a daily additive treatment then do so. The tank and hose are a one-time purchase and the Seafoam is ........ "

Bill, (I deleted the price of the Sea Foam for this forum) I am sure you have helped a ton of people today including me. I was just going to put 1/2 can into the boat gas, put on some muffs, and turn on the hose. After that, crank the engine. Told you I am a clutz an mechanics. LOL I intend to reread every word on this entire thread and then read it all again to try and get an understanding of it. Perhaps Slab will archive this puppy. I will PM him about the thought.