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View Full Version : Slip Float rig for Crappie and Bluegills



Crappitier
10-02-2013, 10:28 PM
First time I seriously used a slip float setup to fish deep water. Under a bridge, in about 35' of water, the crappie and huge 'gills are suspended about 18' deep.

A slip float is so efficient (you cast and the weight takes the lure to the exact depth). We had a 12 mph wind today, so the 1" waves made the lure dance like crazy at the proper depth.

I had a blast today. The slip float is so much better than a drop shot rig.

I caught 6 crappie (all small) and about 50 bluegills. I kept the 2 biggest crappie and 10 bluegills for some wonderful fillets.

Tight Lines,

http://i556.photobucket.com/albums/ss5/raf99_2009/DSCN1647_zps0bc46ac4.jpg

http://i556.photobucket.com/albums/ss5/raf99_2009/DSCN1650_zps2c3c7dec.jpg

Pepop
10-02-2013, 11:01 PM
Great catch! Gills are Delish! But then, so are crappie!

NYHellbender
10-02-2013, 11:30 PM
Glad to see someone enjoying slip corking. Congratz on the catch :cheers2

CrappiePappy
10-03-2013, 03:18 AM
Ain't nothing wrong with that deal !! Good for you :HandsClapping

You might also want to try Vertical Casting when faced with that situation. Feeling the thump is just as exciting as watching the cork disappear !!

If you don't already know about Vertical Casting, here's the "how to" : Crappie Pappy Article (http://www.crappie.com/articles/crappiepappy.htm)

... cp :kewl

japhill
10-03-2013, 05:09 AM
Crappitier, congrats on the catch. Crappiepappy, enjoyed the article.

shipahoy41
10-03-2013, 05:57 AM
First time I seriously used a slip float setup to fish deep water. The slip float is so much better than a drop shot rig.


Tight Lines,

http://i556.photobucket.com/albums/ss5/raf99_2009/DSCN1647_zps0bc46ac4.jpg

http://i556.photobucket.com/albums/ss5/raf99_2009/DSCN1650_zps2c3c7dec.jpg

I agree with your slip float comments. Excellent job there. Congratulations.

Crappitier
10-03-2013, 01:08 PM
If you don't already know about Vertical Casting, here's the "how to"

... cp :kewl

cp,

Thanks so much for that article. It makes a lot of sense to me!

But, with a slip float:

I don't have to use a big jig head to get down in the water. Sometimes the crappie are too finicky to hit the big hook and all that lead? With a slip float rig, I can use a big split shot (1/4 oz) to get the bait down fast, and then have a two foot piece of fluorocarbon line and a small hook. I have a fish finder, so I can see what depth the fish are in.

I'll give your method a try though. Next time I'll take two rods with me.


Edit: I just realized that I can use a big split shot and flouro line with a small hook with the vertical casting method also!! Same thing without the float?

RetiredRR
10-03-2013, 07:36 PM
Thanks for sharing the good info. I know both methods work well.

CrappiePappy
10-03-2013, 07:36 PM
cp,

Thanks so much for that article. It makes a lot of sense to me!

But, with a slip float:

I don't have to use a big jig head to get down in the water. Sometimes the crappie are too finicky to hit the big hook and all that lead? With a slip float rig, I can use a big split shot (1/4 oz) to get the bait down fast, and then have a two foot piece of fluorocarbon line and a small hook. I have a fish finder, so I can see what depth the fish are in.

I'll give your method a try though. Next time I'll take two rods with me.


Edit: I just realized that I can use a big split shot and flouro line with a small hook with the vertical casting method also!! Same thing without the float?

Yes, you can do the Vertical Casting technique with or without additional weight. I was just mentioning the added sinker, when used with my braid, as seemingly making the soft bites more detectable.
I pretty much always use a 1/16oz jighead with a plastic body ... and I will only go down to a 1/32oz jighead when fishing less than the top 5-8ft of the water column, and that's generally when I'm shooting docks. When casting or dock shooting, I add no extra weight & watch the line for indications of strikes ... but, when Vertical Casting, most strikes can be felt, whether extra weight is used or not. And you can use jigs much smaller than the 1/16 & 1/32oz .. and if need be, to get them down deep & do it quicker, you can add a weight.

I'm also using weedless jigheads 99% of the time ... so I'm not nearly as concerned about hanging up. But, when using a open hook jig, sometimes the added sinker can be used to pull the snagged jig free ... by simply dropping & bouncing the rod tip a few times, so that the sinker falls below the jig & pulls the hook free.
The sinker can actually pull triple duty : getting a light bait down faster, help free a snagged hook, and work to add sensitivity to your rig by holding the line down straight & taut ... helping transmit the strike vibration to the rod tip.

... cp :kewl

chucktx
10-03-2013, 08:10 PM
excellent job and a great looking meal!!!!!!!!!!