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mikey1979
04-18-2013, 11:50 AM
Im new to the whole crappie fishing gig and what little crappie i do catch when i fish i catch on minnows and im wanting to learn how to fish jigs. So any info i could get i would appreciate it. Just dont know ANYTHING about it.

river scum
04-18-2013, 07:13 PM
you can cast and count them down and retrieve, drift with them suspended or vertical jig in cover. depends on the water your fishing and location of fish. i like to get rite in on them. some people arent cut out for that though. you need to be slow and very quiet when doing it. youll need some stain to the water also to vertical jig them because they spook. watch the line for the twitch of a bite or feel for the thump. work at it and dont give up. the thump of a jig bite is a wonderful thing. lol add some sent too. crappie nibbles or chunk of minnow or shad works for me.

4THETHUMP
04-18-2013, 07:35 PM
well if you gonna do it , don't get no minners . once you feel the thump it is hard to give it up . I jig fish year around . Once you learn to find the fish , if you try you can catch them on a jig . I use the nibbles too . they work . and color everybody has there favorite . And you never know what the crappie want . it is all a learning curve and sometimes it's a big curve . lol just start and stay with it . good luck

CrappiePappy
04-18-2013, 08:52 PM
I primarily cast jigs for Crappie. I don't do a lot of vertical jigging, longline trolling, or any of the other methods, if I can cast for them. 20ft depths is about the limit on my range of depth, on a cast.

I use a variety of casting outfits, but my primary jig casting outfit is a 6'6" fast action rod (ESP PowerLite) with a 1000 series Shimano Aero reel & 6lb test Vicious hi-vis line. I use 1/16oz weedless jigheads with various plastics. I generally cast well beyond my targeted spot, and start my retrieve right after the jig hits the water. I raise the rod tip up to around the 10 o:clock position, and reel only fast enough to keep a slight bow in the line. I'm basically "swimming" or "slow rolling" the jig. I watch the line, waiting for any movement that I didn't cause. That movement can come in the form of a slight twitch, a pretty good "thump", a sudden change in direction to one side or the other, or the line can suddenly go slack (& I know the jig hasn't hit bottom). The instant I see any of these types of line movement ... I set the hook. 99.9% of the time I will stick the jig hook in the roof of that fish's mouth ... and rarely do any of them escape.

I enjoy the "thump" as much as anyone ... but, I'd rather "SEE" it, than feel it. To my way of thinking, if I can feel the fish ... it can feel ME ... and I'd rather it be a big surprise to the fish, when his "food" bites back !! :Rofl

Dock shooting - I get within about 8-12ft of the outer edge of a dock, & pick a path for my jig to go in & come out ... with emphasis on any inner posts or heavily shaded water along that path. I drop the jig back to around the first guide (closest to the reel) & hold it between my thumb & index finger ... with the hook pointing AWAY from my hand. I grip the line coming off the reel with the index finger of my casting hand & open the bail. Then I'll pull the jig back about even with the reel, & hold it under the reel ... point my rod towards that pathway I picked ... aim my line (between jig & rod tip) to be just a little above parallel with the water's surface, so that the jig will skip/glance off the surface, just inside the outer edge of the dock. Once lined up, I let go of the jig ... and when it passes the end of the rod tip, I let go of the line coming off the reel. TIMING of these releases is key to a successful "shot" ... and if it's done correctly, my jig will skip several times across the surface & end up far under the dock and in line with the path I chose. Then I'll start my retrieve & follow the same procedure as mentioned above, about casting.

And, I can & do use the countdown method ... in dock shooting OR casting ... when I want to cover a lot of different water column depths. I already know that on a normal cast or shot under a dock, my jig is going to go down to around a max depth of 6-8ft on my normal retrieve speed. I can choose to retrieve a little faster if I want the jig to go shallower, or use a lighter jig ... and I go deeper by counting a "one Kentucky" second for each foot below that 6-8ft depth range that I want the jig to reach.

One other method I employ quite often is what I call "Vertical Casting" ... and this article explains that method : Crappie Pappy Article (http://www.crappie.com/articles/crappiepappy.htm)

I use weedless jigheads because I'm most often putting that jig right into the cover or in places where it's likely to encounter obstacles. I use solid body plastics because they stay on the jighead better than hollow plastics, without having to have any extra "help" (in the form of glues or retainer wires, etc).

While these methods are what I "like" to use, there are occasions where another method (or live bait) is more productive, due to the conditions or circumstances outside of my control. In those cases, I'll employ whatever means is necessary ... when I have the proper equipment to allow me to engage in those methods.

... cp :kewl

cschottfish
04-18-2013, 09:01 PM
Cp that was very well explained and may be one of the best ways that I have seen put to words.

skiptomylu
04-18-2013, 10:33 PM
Your getting some good info, but remember the biggest problem some have with a jig is moving it too much. Especially when tight lining over brush or straight down, sometimes they don't want you to move it at all so don't be over active with it. Slow and steady works no matter if trolling or casting. I have some info on my site on the How To Page and be sure to click on links to open more info on this page...
How To (http://thumpitjigs.com/HowTo.html)

shipahoy41
04-19-2013, 06:21 AM
Pappy gave you some really great information. Welcome from Alabama. Here is a link where several individuals have posted their favorite rig setups. http://www.crappie.com/crappie/main-crappie-fishing-forum/157592-knots-rig-drawings-setups-beginners.html Ther are some excellent crappie fishing videos in this thread http://www.crappie.com/crappie/main-crappie-fishing-forum/247956-your-favorite-youtube-crappie-video.html that may help also.

bigal
04-19-2013, 09:38 AM
Mikey,

Some good info here. And I can tell you, the words of CP come from an awful lot of experience.

Alan

mikey1979
04-19-2013, 09:58 AM
Wow !!! This sure sounds like some really good info and also sounds like its coming from alot of experienced folks. Can yall go in more detail on the countdown process. Im sure it all has to do with weight of lure,line size ,etc. From what ive read so far i feel like i could go out and catch a few on the jigs if i can locate them

genec
04-19-2013, 11:25 AM
Mikey, I fish a lot like CP,as for count down I try to count a foot a second even though the weights will fall a little more for each size and each size line but that is not important but just knowing what count the fish hit,usually if fishing submerge brush I would fish if it tops out at 10 ft then I would start out counting at9 or 10 then change if that did not work after a few cast knowing I was casting in right place,as for docks I mostly shoot a 1/32 with a stinger jig, the 1/32 will not fall as quick giving the fish more time as I can reel slower than with 1/16 and will not hang as easy giving the crappie more time to come up and take it,by it being lighter it will skip better under low objects ,yesterday water was high leaving some docks one to two inches and I was shooting under them most of the time ,just had to lighten up on loading rod and still got distant I needed,we had 51 with 6 over 15 inches

CrappiePappy
04-19-2013, 12:20 PM
Wow !!! This sure sounds like some really good info and also sounds like its coming from alot of experienced folks. Can yall go in more detail on the countdown process. Im sure it all has to do with weight of lure,line size ,etc. From what ive read so far i feel like i could go out and catch a few on the jigs if i can locate them

Genec pretty well nailed it on the "countdown" method, as far as it not really mattering what line size or jig weight you're using ... as long as you figure out what count puts your bait in the zone.

You can easily figure out how deep your jig falls per "count" (second), by using your depth finder. Find a spot that's 10ft deep & cast your jig to it ... start your "one Alabama - two Alabama" countdown when the bait has hit the water & you have closed the bail on your reel & raised your rod to the retrieve position. Don't reel in ... just keep counting until the line goes slack. If your bait is falling at about 1ft/sec ... slack line should occur at or close to "ten Alabama".

With that knowledge, you can then cast to the same spot repeatedly, and cover the water column in 1ft depth increases by counting down +1 sec on each succeeding cast. Once you find the depth the fish are suspended at, you'll only need to count to that point on each cast.

If you're casting over a brushpile or some cover that tops out X number of feet below the surface ... you can avoid hanging up your jig, by using the countdown to bring your jig just above the topmost part of the brush/cover. If you have to get into the cover to get a fish to bite, and you're using a open hook jig (non-weedless) ... consider using a vertical jigging presentation. If you have weedless jigs, or you "texas rig" your plastics on a open hook jig ... then you can continue to cast/countdown, and crawl your jig over/around/through that cover. Here's how I "bow to the jig" in order to avoid hanging up, while probing the cover with my jig :

(copied from one of my old posts)
" Even weedless jigheads can/do get hung-up, occasionally. Here's a method I learned, that can keep you from hanging up and/or freeing your weedless jighead from a snag (before it hangs into it):

"One thing that I haven't mentioned lately, that goes along with casting over submerged wood, even with a weedless jighead, is what I call "taking a bow" to avoid getting hung on a branch. Even weedless jigheads can & will get hung, sometimes. This can be avoided, to an extent. When retrieving the jig, usually the line will swing back to you ... and you will notice it at the point where it enters the water (it will continue to get closer to you, as you reel in). When it stays in one spot, as you reel in, that indicates that the line is draped over something submerged in the path of your retrieve. As you continue to reel, eventually the jig will come in contact with that obstacle. As it does, and when the rod tip starts to bend down, a lot of people tend to try and "jerk" the jig over it. That works, sometimes, but quite often - they get hung. I try and avoid getting hung in the cover I'm fishing, so as not to have to break off - disturbing the cover, losing the bait, or alerting the fish to any unnatural conditions. I do this by "taking a bow" - with the rod tip.
In essence - I wait until the jig comes in contact, and the rod tip starts to bend ... then I drop the rod tip about 6" towards the jig, and in one fluid motion raise the rod tip up towards me about 12". This is not done fast, like a jerking motion ... but, more of a slow drop and lift motion. What this does (or seems to do) is allow the bait to fall away from the obstacle - then when you lift it back (twice as far as you let it fall away) the head of the jig "bumps" the obstacle, and "hops" up overtop of it. Well, most of the time, anyway. The reason I don't drop it down 6" and then lift it up more than 12" - is that I want the jig to clear the obstacle, but remain in the general area. I will work a tree top over, with this method, bumping and bowing and hopping the jig over multiple branches. Another reason I don't pull the jig back more than 12", or reel it back in (once I've cleared the branch) ... is because I've had numerous occasions where I've had a fish hit the jig, once it cleared the obstacle and started coming back towards me. In fact, it's happened often enough that I almost "expect" to get a hit, when "taking a bow" over a branch."

... cp :kewl

mikey1979
04-19-2013, 12:48 PM
I would love for me and my son to put 50 or 60 in the boat. Do yall put one or two jigs per line ?

shipahoy41
04-19-2013, 12:54 PM
I would love for me and my son to put 50 or 60 in the boat. Do yall put one or two jigs per line ?

I use two personally.

123067

genec
04-19-2013, 01:52 PM
Mikey, if casting near structure or shooting a dock only one jig otherwise hang ups are for sure unless a cork holds off of structure,I myself only use one jig all the time, can better control bait better. CP, I have a question for you ,how do I suppose to count, one North Carolina ,two North Carolina , don,t know whether one Alabama would sound good with my Carolina friends,LOL ,just kidding.

Donald@CrappieLogic
04-19-2013, 03:20 PM
stick your jig in there and if you aint hung up 60% of the day you aint doing it right:biggrin

CrappiePappy
04-19-2013, 04:34 PM
Mikey, if casting near structure or shooting a dock only one jig otherwise hang ups are for sure unless a cork holds off of structure,I myself only use one jig all the time, can better control bait better. CP, I have a question for you ,how do I suppose to count, one North Carolina ,two North Carolina , don,t know whether one Alabama would sound good with my Carolina friends,LOL ,just kidding.

:Rofl ... gene, maybe you should just count "one cackalaky - two cackalaky" :biggrin


... cp :kewl

bowhunter012463
04-19-2013, 07:39 PM
I try all methods but the one I use the most is using a fixed bobber and pop it twice and let it sit still then pop it twice again and let it sit still an repeat. and if no luck then move the bobber up or down 6" at a time until you find them and I don't like the bobber with the weight on them. most of the time the bobber will go under the water but sometimes it might just lay on its side. Other times I will cast it out with the bobber and reel it in real slow. As far as plastics goes, anything with chartuese, there is so many colors, just get afew like white/chart, black/chart, yellow/chart, red/chart or just straight chartruese but make sure it has silver flakes in them. I would also get some road runners too. Jigs, I don't think colors matters and been having luck lately with a plane lead head, no color at all. Weight of the jigs I would stick with 1/8 oz or 1/4 oz with a light wire hook so you can get unsnag cause you will get snagged and if you don't than you're not doing it right. Hope this helps. Don't be afried to talk to other fishing where you're at and ask them what is working for them and what depth. Most people will help you out and like to have someone to talk to.

blackriver4x4
04-19-2013, 09:06 PM
Some Good Info In here......

chucktx
04-19-2013, 10:29 PM
great info in this thread!!!!!!!

skiptomylu
04-20-2013, 09:29 AM
I almost always use just one jig and in the spring and fall I longline a 1/32 oz Roadrunner and use one pole and one jig. In summer day or night I use both jigs and minnows, I tie on a 1/8 or 1/4 oz jig on the bottom and a hook (for me a Gamakatsu drop shot hook #2 or 1) and I find most of the bigger fish come on the jig, but do believe the smaller fish hitting the minnow can help get more fish active.
The first day this spring my neighbor and I trolled with the troll motor using the little Roadrunners and we limited (50) and didnt even work at it all day. We fished from 7:30 until noon and then from 3:00 to 5:30. Oh this was superbowl Sunday.
sorry pic didn't post first time.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b47/Skip48/Fish%20Catch/DSC08049copy_zps7a2f3178.jpg (http://s16.photobucket.com/user/Skip48/media/Fish%20Catch/DSC08049copy_zps7a2f3178.jpg.html)

mikey1979
04-21-2013, 10:01 PM
u guys were right about the "thump" today my son and i went out for a couple of hours and started out with minnows and didn't catch anything but bass then i switched to a roadrunner and started catching a crappie about every cast throwing at a shallow stump. i was hooked after that even though not many of them were keepers it was way more fun than minnow fishing. thanks for all of your help !!!!!

jpshen76
04-22-2013, 11:35 AM
Try one casting, second casting, three, may be four, or more, then getting sense where the bits stay

Cmj
04-22-2013, 11:40 AM
Try one casting, second casting, three, may be four, or more, then getting sense where the bits stay

Huh? :dono

hookum
04-22-2013, 01:45 PM
Myself I like to jig and bob, once I find what depth there at The Bob holds it at that depth, I usually use a 1/32 with a slip Bobber that has a toothpick in it to hold it in place and I can change depths on the fly. This is really good for going around edges of laydowns and other brush piles on the banks.

flounderNY
04-22-2013, 11:51 PM
I made this video for beginners at jigging.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrQ3wJr5y0