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tommyboyrn
01-05-2013, 09:57 AM
Hey crappie.com'rs

I am planning on getting a shop in spring to store all my stuff, boat, mower, rods etc. I was curious as to how im gonna set it all up to get the best use out of the space. So if you have a shop/dedicated garage and you dont mind, post some pics so I can get some ideas.
I appreciate your time and help:biggrin

Tom

Drifty4
01-05-2013, 11:02 AM
It doesn't really matter how you organize your stuff, eventually you will have more stuff in there than there is room for. :biggrin

Benches and shelves help, but right now I just bring the seasonal stuff to the front and hope for the best.

Rees Guide
01-05-2013, 11:06 AM
All I can say is, no matter how big you think you need it multiply that by 2, if you are planning a 20X30 go ahead and do a 40X60, you'll thank yourself in a year or so.

CatFan
01-05-2013, 11:11 AM
Hey crappie.com'rs

I am planning on getting a shop in spring to store all my stuff, boat, mower, rods etc. I was curious as to how im gonna set it all up to get the best use out of the space. So if you have a shop/dedicated garage and you dont mind, post some pics so I can get some ideas.
I appreciate your time and help:biggrin

Tom

Check out the forum at garagejournal.com for some great ideas.

The very best rod storage idea I've ever seen was a rack on the ceiling over the boat. They were way up out of the way unless you were standing in the boat, but from the boat you could just reach up and hang them up or get them down with no effort.

Some ideas I've accumulated over the years if I ever build a dedicated boat garage:

Outlet in the ceiling with a cord hanging down to charge the boat.

Ceiling fans to help dry the boat when it comes home wet.

Shelves 7 or 8 ft high along one side that you can reach from the boat to load and unload it without climbing in and out.

NeonMoon
01-05-2013, 03:26 PM
Tom, this may sound silly, but it works. Get you a pad of 1/4" squared paper. Draw-out (to scale) the larger items you know you'll be dealing with (boat, truck, workbench, compressor, etc. you get the idea), then arrange them within a specific area (30'x40' just for example, but naturally using the same scale) and see how they fit.

I know many do it on their computer....but I'm "Old School" (paper and pencil) :biggrin (plus I just ain't that computer savvy)

sls
01-05-2013, 04:24 PM
They also have rails for slide in plastic storage containers that are placed on the ceiling, pretty neat for the seasonal stuff. Just label the bottom of the container and you know what is in it

rnvinc
01-05-2013, 05:21 PM
Here's my ceiling mounted long-rod rack...directly over my boat so I can stand up in the boat and load them into the boat...

Rickie

skeetbum
01-05-2013, 08:47 PM
Hey Tommy. I store my rods overhead and haven't damaged a rod since. A small stool might be needed to access them, but it's by far the best way that I have found yet. There are several ways to get it done, some with some basic carpenter skills needed. The end result of the wooden versions are stained and urethaned and look very good, not rough and rustic. Anyway, here's a pic of my shed when I had them up there. I have a garage now and just moved them to it and changed them to be tip to tip and I store twice as many in the same space. Holler if you need any details, I kinda owe you one anyway.
A workbench stout enough for Elephants to mate on runs the left wall of the garage, storage shelves run left to right on the back wall. Shelves in the back right corner are for fishing and boat stuff, cuts down on search time and fills a dead space. You can see the rods in the back right corner n the ceiling rafters. Stripe painted in yellow and the floor of the stall the boat sits in keeps the boat from getting into the door frame when you back in. You can also see that I spend a lot of time fishing and less time cleaning up the grudge. Rows of lights on individual switches per row makes it easier to light what you need, and lots of outlets set 4' off the floor will serve you well also. A table built at a comfortable height and unattached will help when building and painting and whatever, including draggin it outside to clean fish on. My back doesn't hurt so bad since I built mine.

tommyboyrn
01-05-2013, 09:16 PM
lots of great ideas.......thanks
catfan, i satyed on the garage website for almost an hour "just looking"- excellent thanks

tommyboyrn
01-05-2013, 09:19 PM
Skeet, thats what im talking about. I like your line painted to help backing in.....

CatFan
01-05-2013, 11:20 PM
lots of great ideas.......thanks
catfan, i satyed on the garage website for almost an hour "just looking"- excellent thanks

Everytime I go there I spend an hour or more. One of the most amazing things I've found there is that porcelain tile is so nice in a garage.

jimp
01-06-2013, 06:27 AM
check out familyhandymandotcom as well, lots of useful info and tips. I'm no where near as organized as SB, but I have a spot for the boat, and a spot for the riding mower, then everything I try to keep out of the way in some form or fashion (mainly not in front of the mower or boat) and go from there. I've been threatening to go out to the shed and spend a day cleaning and sorting it out, but I've not done yet. LOL. If you are going to have exposed interior stud walls, you can make lots of small shelves by just cutting scrap 2x4's to lenght and attaching them in-between the studs, works great for the small stuff that fit on the 3.5" shelf.

genec
01-06-2013, 02:33 PM
I have a shed for boat and another one for shop and some small ones for other things, shop is ful ,sheds is full and where my boat is,i have shelves in back and both sidewalls hanging full,2 rod racks over boat in the top full also,too much stuff for so many years of fishing, i also have a painted line on floor for backing boat and a stopper for trailer so it will not go too far, when i was young i could not adford a rod and reel ,had to cut a pole and tie line to it,and took barrels and put wood on it for my boat,and now we have the gauld to say how tough it is now,oh if young people only knew.

Spaceman
01-07-2013, 08:27 PM
This is the garage plan I built. I did make some modifications. Mine has one double door that is 8' tall, and it is brick to match my house. I built a an L-shaped workbench, with cabinet space underneath, This is along the left side of the back wall almost and left wall. I mounted unfinished oak cabinets above the work bench. If you choose to go this route, put lots of outlets throughout. Also ensure you have some that are rated for 20 amps. Mine is used as a woodworking shop and also stores my 19' triton easily. As others have already mentioned, if it is in the budget, bigger is better. I personally would like mine to be about 4' wider and 4' longer.

Oh yeah, I also pulled fiber and cable to the garage. Someday the loft may be the man cave. Enjoy your planning and hope you get what you want!

Garage Plans - 24' x 32' with Loft - pl16 (http://www.garageplansonline.com/index_files/garageplan24x32pl16.htm)

skeetbum
01-07-2013, 08:39 PM
That's a jam up Grudge Spaceman. I saw one similar that was a few feet wider to accommodate a bench and still park 2 cars comfortable, The loft in this one was barn style, Mansard roof? one way or the other there's a lot of useful space.

Spaceman
01-08-2013, 12:02 AM
Skeetbum et al, Thanks...i also went with a 11' ceiling to accomodate working with larger pieces of wood. I like many of the ideas others posted for maximizing space, especially the rod storage from the rafters. I mentioned using oak cabinets in the woodworking area not to be pretentious. I actually found the unfinished cabinets from Lowes to be less expensive than specialty shop/garage cabinets which are very expensive. Since, I have 11' ceilings l was also able to mount storage shelving high and above the garage door for items use infrequently. if applicable, another idea for folks to consider is to mount heavier items (eg band saw, router table, etc) on casters. This allows for easy configuration changes. For tackle storage, I actually keep much of that in the boat, tailored to the season. It is all cleaned/re-rigged after each trip and put back into the boat ready for the next trip. Since, I also create a lot of sawdust, I cover the boat with a cheap blue tarp from harbor freight. Battery charger/maintainer gets plugged in..ready to go.

jimp
01-08-2013, 01:07 PM
Spaceman;
mine is very similar to the one shown in the link but only 24x24, and one double OH door, center loft for storage of "junk" and empty boxes I'll never need or use, (but I might, ya know) and I used matching vinyl siding. House is all brick but I didn't want to pay for brick on the shed so I put enough vinyl on the house so it would all "match".

skeetbum
01-08-2013, 07:40 PM
Mine is 24X30 and was here when I bought. The boat is just over 25' with motor trimmed so I'm glad for the extra length. I've had cabinets before and liked em, just didn't put em in here. Yet. I could use the room overhead too.

Spaceman
01-08-2013, 08:54 PM
Roger on the extra length. I don't have a swing tongue on my trailer. As you state, and while accounting for a trailer and motor, my 19' boat is much longer. it is nice to have the depth, but I still bump the shins occasionally.

Jimp, my upstairs storage is much like yours...it seems to multiply!

jimp
01-09-2013, 06:57 AM
My Tracker PT175 w/ the 60 in the toter fits in the 24'r, but I have the swing tongue which helps alot, otherwise I would probably have to step over the tonuge to get around when the OH is closed. A man needs to build as big as he can afford, not what he needs at the moment, seems like in no time the shed is overflowing and you have to go on a snipe hunt, then go buy what you need, then you find what you couldn't find, ending up with 3 of the same thing, and next year you'll have 4 of the same thing. LOL

Handicrappie
01-09-2013, 10:17 AM
All I can say is, no matter how big you think you need it multiply that by 2, if you are planning a 20X30 go ahead and do a 40X60, you'll thank yourself in a year or so.

Gewber, a 40 by 60 is 4 times as big as a 20 by 30. MS math system fails us again:)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Spaceman
01-09-2013, 10:19 AM
And, I thought I was the only one that bought another item I already have because I couldn't find it:-)

jimp
01-09-2013, 01:04 PM
Gewber, a 40 by 60 is 4 times as big as a 20 by 30. MS math system fails us again:)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

2x 20 =40

2x 30 =60

math seems correct to me. :crazy:

crappiewisdom
01-09-2013, 01:16 PM
If you are figuring square footage, a 40 x 60 space is 4 times larger than a 20 x 30 space.

20 x 30 = 600 sq ft

40 x 60 + 2400 sq foot

Just my 2 cents worth.:twocents

Handicrappie
01-09-2013, 03:54 PM
2x 20 =40

2x 30 =60

math seems correct to me. :crazy:

TN math system in failure mode also:)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

ATM
01-09-2013, 04:06 PM
111979

Rees Guide
01-09-2013, 06:47 PM
2x 20 =40

2x 30 =60

math seems correct to me. :crazy:

Great minds think alike:biggrin

EARL KITCHENS
01-09-2013, 07:06 PM
Wow. We now know why China owns us! I guess basic math is not so basic! LMBO

jimp
01-09-2013, 07:15 PM
Great minds think alike:biggrin

I agree. :Rofl

tommyboyrn
01-09-2013, 08:37 PM
this is hilarioous:biggrin

tommyboyrn
01-22-2013, 03:17 PM
For all the electricians- I am gonna try to "pull" it myself (wire) just seeing what you guys recommend as. To type/gauge to run, as well as how many amp feed do I need? I will be running electric from house, and I cannot/dont plan on welding so basically I have air compressor/saws and other tools so if that helps

Tom

Bottombumper
01-22-2013, 04:50 PM
Tommy- I ran my power from the house myself. I have a metal 32 x32 shop. I planned it for a 20 x32 carport out front to accomidate 2 vehicles and my boat. The interior was 10 x 30. The Shop is located on end of house that the Laundry Room is located. Approximately 75 ft. from house. I wanted a 220 outlet current to the Shop in case I needed it for welding and other tools. I turned off the 30 amp Breaker to Electric Dryer. Unpluged Dryer and removed front of the outlet and saw I had enough room to attach Wiring and come out the bottom of outlet. I run #8 underground wire thru Flex Plastic Conduit thru wall and then dug up a trench about 8 inches deep to shop and slid rigid PVC over the wire a section at a time attaching each section before placing in trench. Wet a wash cloth and apply Joy Dishwashing ti it and lubricate wire as you pull through conduit. I attached wires to a 240 volt 32 amp off-own Switch. I ran my 220 outlet receptable straight off bottom legs of this box. I then run wiring to a 6 Breaker Box with 20 Amp breakers. I ran a #12 wire to the light and receptables. Im not sugesting you wire yours like this but just an example of how you could do it. I have a lot of experience with Commercial Power and wasnt that hard for me. Hard work and knowledge of what you are doing is a must. You might decide on a Certified Electrican if you have any doubts. Good Luck with your project. BB

trkyhunter
01-22-2013, 06:03 PM
It doesn't really matter how you organize your stuff, eventually you will have more stuff in there than there is room for. :biggrin

Benches and shelves help, but right now I just bring the seasonal stuff to the front and hope for the best.
Yeah definately need a bench as a catch all so you can say" where the $#@& did that go"
just nlike the rest of us lol.

eagle 1
01-22-2013, 06:13 PM
no matter what you do . have a double sink, floor drain and ele. outlets in the ceiling/walls every 8 ft . and a designed place for a air compressor twice what you thin you would ever need . jmo .

tommyboyrn
01-22-2013, 08:45 PM
thanks guys, thanks bottombumper. I have NO knowledge of electricity other than it hurts when it hits you, by I am fairly mechanically inclined. I will prolly have electrician run line to main breaker in shop and get the wiring neat and tidy, but im gonna do some research and see what I come up with. Thanks for the info/

Hanr3
01-22-2013, 10:43 PM
DO a layout before you build the thing.

I have a 2 stall attached garage and the only time any vehicle gets parked inside is when I am working on it. I have a 10x10 shed out back for the garden/lawn tools.
My garage is a work zone (furniture, cabinets, vehiocle repair, mower repair, other repairs, rebuilt transmissions, etc), storage zone (crap coming into the house and crap coming out of hte house, storage zone (recylce materials, boxes incase I ever move agian (stereo, tv, etc.), you name it my garage has seen it. Right now I have tools scattered all over the place from building bathroom caibnets, doing some repairs on a cousins truck, staging my ice fishing gear, and charging the batteries on a friends plow truck. Actually his truck is in the driveway with a power cord running out to it to keep the diesel engine warm during this cold spell. Batteries have been charged.

I would love to build another garage for the boat and camper (haven't made it yet), and store all my garden/yard tools, plus my work space. Then maybe we can park our car/truck in the garage. However I would need to remove a 50+ year old Oak tree and pine tree. That oak is 4' in diameter and close to 80' tall. She is a beautifull tree and I really hate the idea of cutting her down.

Hanr3
01-23-2013, 08:18 PM
For all the electricians- I am gonna try to "pull" it myself (wire) just seeing what you guys recommend as. To type/gauge to run, as well as how many amp feed do I need? I will be running electric from house, and I cannot/dont plan on welding so basically I have air compressor/saws and other tools so if that helps

Tom

You need to know the local Electrical codes. Highly recommend contacting your local electrician.
As for the circuits. If this was my garage/shop I would run a
20amp light circuit (plenty of flourescent lights, garage door opener, dust collection system, air movement system),
20 amp circuit for each wall for hand power tools, bench tools, floor standing tools. Assumes you will only be running one tool at a time. If your running more than one at a time, you may need more circuits.
and a seperate circuit for the air compressor (compressor dictates amperage).

What abour HEating Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC)? Depending on what you put in, will determine what you need for electricity. This is also a seperate circuit.

Spaceman
01-23-2013, 10:07 PM
You need to know the local Electrical codes. Highly recommend contacting your local electrician.
As for the circuits. If this was my garage/shop I would run a
20amp light circuit (plenty of flourescent lights, garage door opener, dust collection system, air movement system),
20 amp circuit for each wall for hand power tools, bench tools, floor standing tools. Assumes you will only be running one tool at a time. If your running more than one at a time, you may need more circuits.
and a seperate circuit for the air compressor (compressor dictates amperage).

What abour HEating Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC)? Depending on what you put in, will determine what you need for electricity. This is also a seperate circuit.

Hanr3 provides wise advice. I too recommend an electrician. 20amp circuits require different wiring than 15amps. A worthwhile investment. I presume you are building something that will require a building permit. If so, this will require an electrical inspection. This is not an area to take a shortcut.

I actually ran a 200amp circuit to my workshop...maybe overkill, but I have plenty of power for many outlets on each wall. I have at least one 20amp outlet on each wall. I also installed separate circuits for a cabinet tablesaw and air compressor.

If you have a chance and it works for you, I recommend you install flourescent lights on the ceiling. For my 24x32 workshop, I have 6- 4' lights on the ceiling. 4 on one switch and 2 on another so I don't have to have all the lights on at one time.

I also had the opportunity and ran cable and cat5e during construction. I haven't done anything with it yet, but it is available.

I am not sure where you will site your structure, but here are a couple of other ideas to overload you. My workshop is off my driveway next to the attached garage on my house. I installed plenty of outside lighting for the kids to use with the basketball goal at night. Because of my location, I placed a motion detector flood light above the garage door. When we drive up to the house at night, the light comes on. Also, installed outlets in the soffets controlled by a separate switch. I never know when my wife will make me install Christmas lights on the workshop too. When the electrician did the wiring, he installed one outlet on each external wall.

It doesn't all have to be done at one time. The only things you really have to do right the first time is framing, wiring and closing it in. You can evolve the workshop from there over time. Things like insulation, drywall, cabinets/workbench, shelving, and other toys came come in time and when the budget allows.

Good luck!

cruisecontrol49
01-23-2013, 10:38 PM
Hard to give you a good answer without knowing the lay of the land.

If it's going to require inspection, then that binds you to the code requirements, even if you do it yourself, under a homeowner permit.

If you sub-feed off existing power, then existing service has to be large enough to carry the extra load. I have saved money by putting a new separate service to the new structure and not having to buy wire for sub-feed (if your going overhead)

It's hard to say without asking more questions....but from what you have said so far I would guess minimum 50 amps/220v to 150amps/ 220v

Wire everything that can be wired to 220v... it cuts your amps, and therefore, your wire size in half versus 110v

....pm me if you need any help

tommyboyrn
01-24-2013, 07:48 PM
"Wire everything that can be wired to 220v... it cuts your amps, and therefore, your wire size in half versus 110v"

Whats this mean? I dont weld or anything that would have 220 requirment?
I am clueless about all this, thats why i am asking and steadily leaning toward electrician. but i do want to know what to ask for/ getting what I need
Tom

Bronson
01-24-2013, 09:22 PM
All I can say is, no matter how big you think you need it multiply that by 2, if you are planning a 20X30 go ahead and do a 40X60, you'll thank yourself in a year or so.


Agreed, and then some if you can afford it.

cruisecontrol49
01-24-2013, 11:07 PM
"Wire everything that can be wired to 220v... it cuts your amps, and therefore, your wire size in half versus 110v"

Whats this mean? I dont weld or anything that would have 220 requirment?
I am clueless about all this, thats why i am asking and steadily leaning toward electrician. but i do want to know what to ask for/ getting what I need
Tom

I don't know what the future plans are for your shop....220v compressor?...220v air conditioning?....220v heaters?...220v large saws? etc.
It is just like these guys are saying about doubling the shop size....I never heard anybody say " I wish my shop was smaller "

If you are positively sure of all your future electrical requirements for the life of your shop, then you are golden.

...not trying to confuse you with the 220v feed, you can still pull your all your 110v circuits off the 220v panel, even if you never have a 220v requirement.....but if you do need it in the future, it is already there, and it should not cost that much more money.


A good electrician should give you good advice when he sees your existing layout and listens to your requirements.

toothpick
01-27-2013, 01:02 PM
I have utilized 4'X8' pegboard from floor to about one foot from the ceiling in in my garage to hang all my tools and a good bit of fishing stuff and boating stuff. You can find it better that way. I have installed base cabinets like in a Kitchen with tops that make great storage and workbenches. Free standing shelves were put against the pegboard in some areas where you can use the shelves and the pegboard together. My garage is divided her's and his. It's amazing how much her's creeps into his! My compressor, table saw, power washer, radial arm saw are stored between the two sides. Large wooden shelves are placed back to back in the center facing both sides. 8' 4 bulb flouresent lights cover both sides. You can never have too much light. My garage door is an overhead 16' and a separate 3' walkthrough. The large door makes backing a boat much easier.

tommyboyrn
01-27-2013, 05:53 PM
many thanks on the info!! Appreciate the info cruisecontrol