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CrappieHound
02-17-2012, 05:01 PM
Does anyone catch crappie on Ole' Man River? I know there have to be some mean crappie swimming in those waters. Just wondering if anyone has any tactics they would like to share for catching. We fish mostly between Memphis and Dyersburg, Tn. I'm guessing the best place is behind dikes but any info would be appreciated.

kincade
02-17-2012, 09:33 PM
In the Alton area, you need to fish the sloughs

feeshrman
02-17-2012, 09:37 PM
The only crappie fishing i am aware of on the MS river is on the oxbows. They are some of the best places to catch quality crappie at times, it depends on water levels and clarity. Of course there must be crappie in the river itself,i've just never heard of anyone trying to catching them. I can only imagine with the constant changing currents, muddy water, and structure such as whole trees and such rolling down the big muddy that it would be a nitemare to locate anything that would be considered a consistant pattern.

Wildcatter
02-18-2012, 12:53 AM
I don't know about the Miss, but here on the Ohio the fishin doesn't get good till it warms up. We usually fish the creeks and the slews and do pretty well.

Tim The Lippa Rippa Mon
02-18-2012, 12:56 AM
Slough and back water areas are great advise, but don't over look points, log jams, and other current breaking things such as lwing dams, islands, bridges, boulders, etc. You can even catch good numbers of them behind roller dams at times, especially along their slip lines that pass by cover. Crappie utilise edges to ambush their prey, and thats a great spot for them to do that in. They generally do not stay right in tough currents in rivers, but if their food source is holding there, they will dart in and out of it to feed, then return back to their current breaks.

Hope this helps ya some! Big bites, full baskets, and God's blessings to ya!

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no1son
02-18-2012, 04:00 AM
There certainly are crappies in the main channel of the Mississippi here in Minnesota. Around here they also tend to average larger and are heavier bodied than lake crappies. Side channels and inflowing streams can be dynamite as it warms up, but don't overlook eddies around bridge pilings, or shoreline pockets and eddies and the other current breaks or warm water sources during cold seasons. At lot of these spots are seasonal, and one has to sort that out, but the crappies are there. Here in Minneapolis one overlooked set of spots are running street drains, better if they do not run dry, but often fabulous as the drains start to run in and after a rain.

Cray
02-18-2012, 12:43 PM
Years ago when I was stationed in Millington had a civilian that worked for me that fished the river a lot for crappie. They always fished up around the Covington area down to Shelby forest. They would wait till the river was down where they could get into the oxbows that have no other acess and when it got real low they would fish in the holes below the wing dams. When it was right they could fill a boat up.

sliles
02-18-2012, 12:55 PM
You can catch some hogs in those sloughs

CrappieHound
02-18-2012, 08:14 PM
Thanks guys,

I have fished the Tenn. River a lot but when I recently got married and moved within rock throwing distance of the Mississippi, I had to learn new water....muddy water, Ha! The current differences between the two rivers is unbelievable and have to admit, I miss the Tenn. River. Oh well, life is short and as Jerry Clower would say, "are you gonna talk or fish?"

feeshrman
02-19-2012, 12:15 AM
sounds like good info, i would like to try it someday
Years ago when I was stationed in Millington had a civilian that worked for me that fished the river a lot for crappie. They always fished up around the Covington area down to Shelby forest. They would wait till the river was down where they could get into the oxbows that have no other acess and when it got real low they would fish in the holes below the wing dams. When it was right they could fill a boat up.

SlabLapper4sure
02-19-2012, 01:23 AM
KNOCK HIM OUT JOHN, It was a suped up wildcat!! Crappie fishing is excellent all up and down the Miss. River in slough's and oxbows'. But be careful in the main river. The OLD Man is a dangerous place for the unprepared!

OLD GEEZER FISHERMEN NEVER DIE, THEY JUST SMELL THAT WAY!!

broharrell
02-19-2012, 01:37 AM
Find some oxbows off the river on the map and check them out.

jesse63b
02-19-2012, 02:16 PM
i live on the river here in Wisconsin, and that's all i target is crappies during the fall and winter. got to find backwaters. took me a couple of years to figure out the crappie situation here but once i got it figured out its easy. they don't get to huge here average good sized crappie in my neck of the woods is 12-13 inchers. lots and lots of 10 inchers as well. went out the yesterday morning for a few hours by desoto in a place i found this fall and nailed em.

BigKyd
02-20-2012, 06:13 PM
Yall aint worried about the mercury levels?

P-row
02-20-2012, 07:36 PM
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CrappieHound
02-20-2012, 08:18 PM
Nice!

no1son
02-22-2012, 05:59 AM
Yall aint worried about the mercury levels?

There is no place that shouldn't be a worry to anyone feeding wild caught fish to reproductive age women and children. We men aren't so much at risk. Here in Minnesota, we get some 90% of ours from out of state on the prevailing westerlies. It washes out in rain storms, changes chemical composition then and becomes persistent in our waters, moving up the food chain. We export some 90% of ours the same way. It then moves up the food chain and concentrates on the top of the aquatic food chain. Crappies don't live as long as some of the major predators like walleyes, pike and muskies, and so are less likely to have dangerous levels but still test out above that in the larger sizes in a lot of waters. Working with the state health department our DNR posts consumption advisories on lakes they have tested. Out of some thousands tested very very few lakes do not show some species that tests dangerous. That includes a whole lot of our pristine north country lakes, where some very high levels have been found due to being directly downwind of the power plants in the Dakotas and the Prairie Provinces with the addition of more aquatic mercury from taconite mining in the Iron Range.

Due to the fact that fish do not pass mercury contamination on in their eggs, each fish starts out clean and accumulates as it ages; so smaller fish are safer.

Mercury pollution is persistent and simply does not go away in contaminated waters with the passing of time either. It also purges very slowly from the human body, although it does. The danger is that it can damage development in the unborn and in developing juveniles even in small doses.

Downstream y'all get a number of other runoff pollutants added. Being at the top of the watershed we have fewer of those than downstream fishermen encounter. As for mercury there can be quite a difference in contamination levels between up wind and down wind of pollution sources, too.

It doesn't seem to hurt the fish though even in levels that are definitely dangerous to the human population. They all start out clean, while we don't necessarily do that due to the fact that we are mammals and take so long to mature both prenatally and as children.

Sweet Lucy
02-22-2012, 10:31 AM
Crappiehound i have always wondered the same thing. I always say every year i am going to try it but never do.