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View Full Version : Advice, dont loose fish.



mighty
03-01-2006, 09:58 AM
Okay like I said in the other thread I lost several fish yesturday. I know it comes with the territory but I would like to reduce it as much as possible. I have been trying to be careful not to pull to hard, but on several instances the fish just pulled off. I am wondering if the they were not hooked good or if my drag was too tight. Maybe my hooks were not sharp enough. On that note how often should you change your hooks.

Will someone please post some info on how not to loose as many fish.

Should the drag be real loose, help

Thanx:D :mad:

Billbob
03-01-2006, 10:04 AM
i dont use drags i will back reel if i have to check your hooks

Mopar Matt
03-01-2006, 10:08 AM
Are you fishing with minnows or jigs? If you are using minnows try some tru-turn hooks. I have had good luck with them.

3GIRLSDAD
03-01-2006, 10:13 AM
What type of set up are you fishing with? UL, jig pole, tight lining with jig, minnow under float? I seem to lose most of my fish at the boat when I am lazy and don't want to bend down to grab the net. Try to lft em up and they come off. If you are losing them during playing them in I would say to much pressure and hook is pulling out. Fine line between tight line and too much pressure. Also might be setting hook to hard, I often do this the first couple of times I catch fish after not fishing for a while, usually just lifting up on the rod tip or a light sweeping motion away from structure is all it takes, then just keep constant light pressure. Hope this helps, Some others may have better info. Good luck.

3GD

Singlepole
03-01-2006, 10:21 AM
If your hook will scratch your fingernail the hook is plenty sharp. I use a dip net for every fish no matter the size, cause they don't call them PAPERMOUTHS for nothing. I can't begin to count the number of fish that has come off the hook at the top of the water, but luckly the net was there to make the save. Keeping just enough tension on the line to not give slack should help land the fish 99% of the time. Good luck and happy catching:)

mattcombs
03-01-2006, 10:27 AM
Yep, a slight whip of the wrist and they're hooked!

Most times, crappie will hook themselves, especially if you are casting and reeling back.

Barnacle Bill
03-01-2006, 10:54 AM
Open your hook gap up just a little.

SteveJ
03-01-2006, 11:00 AM
Open your hook gap up just a little.

Thats why I like a bigger hook in my jigs than most.

CrappiePappy
03-01-2006, 11:11 AM
you may not have been getting a good hookset (esp if the float was a ways off from the rod tip, or there was slack line between rodtip & float). Minnow/hook rigs are notorious for loosing fish ... simply because you don't know what part of the mouth the hook is going to stick into. That's one thing I have against the hook/sinker or hook/sinker/float setup. And one reason I prefer to cast jigs - I set the hook with "speed", rather than "force", when casting jigs. A fast snap of the wrist, as I raise the rod up with my forearm is how I set the hook (jig casting) ... and I rarely hook a Crappie anywhere other than the roof of the mouth (since the single hook of a jig is always pointing UP/forward). I haven't lost more than a half dozen Crappie in 20yrs of jig casting, due to the fish coming unbuttoned or the jig pulling/ripping loose (and most of those were hooked in the lip membrane). When fishing with a float, though, I usually let the fish run a little ... tighten the line (remove the slack) with the reel ... while I lift the rod until I feel weight ... THEN give the rod a quick upward snap with the wrist.

I set my drag so that I can set the hook on a solid object, and the drag slips well before the line would break. Leaving the drag real loose can allow the fish to outrun the line tension, get slack, or bury into some nearby cover -- tightening it down too far can put too much pressure on a "surprise" bite/hookset, and break your line or rip the hook free of the fish's mouth.

I don't know if, and won't say that, any of this will keep you from losing fish in the future .... sometimes they just get away :D It isn't always "operator error" that's the culprit ... sometimes it's just the fish that get "lucky" ;)

............. luck2ya .....cp :cool:

mighty
03-01-2006, 12:00 PM
I use floaters, sinkers, and hooks and cast jigs. When I lost the fish yesturday I was on the dock not too much slack in the line. I hooked it fought with it, didn't even get to see and boom fish gone, bobber comes floats back.


Part of the game

izzysfishin
03-01-2006, 12:40 PM
I lost several fish last year, turned out to be the jigs i bought. The barb was so small it might as well have been barbless. Try a wider gap hook, or bend the hook open some. With jigs i allways twist the hook a little sideways to the head, it seems to help on hookups for me...izzy

fishdoc
03-01-2006, 06:11 PM
if using bobber and hook switch to a lite jighead (1/32) on a #4 e.c. 570 hook...you'll hook most in top of lip and have to use pliers to get them off!

fishingpox
03-01-2006, 06:24 PM
I do exactly what ..izzy.. stated. I bend my jig hooks out about a 1/16th of an inch. And if I'm fishing heavy structure, I try to play the fish as much as possible.

CrappiePappy
03-02-2006, 02:02 AM
if you were using weedless jigheads .... you wouldn't need to bend them or modify them. The "weedguard" acts like a second "hook", sorta/kinda like ...

If hooked in the roof of the mouth ... the weedguard pushes against the roof, keeping opposite pressure against the jig hook (essentially holding the hook in place).
If hooked in the lip ... the weedguard is on the opposite side of the lip, from the hook shank - and "pushes" against the lip, when the hook is trying to back out thru its entry hole (blocking the retraction of the hook, somewhat).

And you also don't have to worry about getting your jig hung in the "heavy cover", as much - and having to break off, straighten the hook, disturb the brush/fish, or have quite so many jigs in your tacklebox. And no need to bend them to the side or out .... that's counterproductive on a weedless jighead. And you don't take the chance of weakening the hook shank, with the bending.

Just MHO ..... take it for what it's worth ........ cp :cool:

fishingpox
03-02-2006, 06:50 AM
I was thinking of buying some weedless jigheads. I believe I have read some time ago you like Oldham..something like that...Where do you buy them? I never find any in BPS store. Maybe they have them in on-line store.

Thanks for the info, Rusty






if you were using weedless jigheads .... you wouldn't need to bend them or modify them. The "weedguard" acts like a second "hook", sorta/kinda like ...

If hooked in the roof of the mouth ... the weedguard pushes against the roof, keeping opposite pressure against the jig hook (essentially holding the hook in place).
If hooked in the lip ... the weedguard is on the opposite side of the lip, from the hook shank - and "pushes" against the lip, when the hook is trying to back out thru its entry hole (blocking the retraction of the hook, somewhat).

And you also don't have to worry about getting your jig hung in the "heavy cover", as much - and having to break off, straighten the hook, disturb the brush/fish, or have quite so many jigs in your tacklebox. And no need to bend them to the side or out .... that's counterproductive on a weedless jighead. And you don't take the chance of weakening the hook shank, with the bending.

Just MHO ..... take it for what it's worth ........ cp :cool:

CrappiePappy
03-02-2006, 10:22 AM
I've used Oldham's Surelock weedless jigheads for many years. And I even "dissed" some of the other types, in favor of them. But, that was several years ago. And while I still think that Oldham's makes a great weedless jighead, it is no longer my favorite. My partner still uses them, exclusively, and does just fine with them. I, on the other hand, have moved to using the brush style & V-wing style of weedless jighead, made right here in KY !! P&S Custom Tackle owner, Paul Mullins, and I have developed a friendship ... and I order my weedless jigheads from him. I can custom order by weight, hook size, guard style, hook color, etc. and he fixes me up. Now, it may take him a little while, on special or large orders, but I know I'm getting good quality products. And I'm getting them from a Crappie.com member !! Paul can be reached by email : baitmaker2000@hotmail.com

Oldham's Surelock jigheads are no longer sold thru BPS, and they've never had a website. I'm not sure if they are even being sold on anyone else's site, either. But, Terry Oldham can be reached at: 1-800-596-2436 .... and be sure and specify "Surelock" weedless Crappie jigheads, as he does make another style called a "Speedloader" weedless Crappie jighead. Surelocks only come in 1/16oz and are unpainted, flattened pill shaped, with collar barb. Speedloader weedless jigheads come in 1/32 & 1/16oz and are shaped like the big end half of a baseball bat (sort of an "insert" style shape). My preference was always the Surelock, since I hook the tube or grub - rather than insert my jigheads. Last time I checked - they retailed for around $3.50 for an 8pk. The weedguard, of an Oldham's weedless Crappie jighead, is a thin wire loop that slips under the hookpoint. They work very well, as long as the integrity of the wire loop is kept. But, they bend up very easily (esp when trying to get a hook out from deep inside a fish's mouth) ... and even though they can be bent back into usable shape a few times - they will eventually break, leaving you with a plain jighead.

There may be some other members that custom make weedless jigheads.

And there's always the "el cheapo" versions at WallaceWorld.

Whatever you get, and wherever you get them, give them a try ... I don't think you'll be disappointed. And you'll be able to put that jig right down into some pretty gnarly cover, and expect to get it back out ... a lot more often than not !! ......... luck2ya ...... cp :cool:

russ
03-02-2006, 10:33 AM
If you are jig fishing, especially verticle jigging, SET THE HOOK HARD!! Forget about what you have heard about the "papermouth". Make your initial hook set a hard one and let the pole and drag do the rest. If you set the hook hard, it will put the hook in the upper part of the crappie's mouth, which is the hardest part. You will lose alot less fish by doing this instead of setting the hook lightly.

Hope this helps.
Russ
www.midwestcrappie.com