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AtticaFish
01-22-2010, 12:13 PM
Have read in a couple different places (saw 1 on the water as well) about using a flyrod blank as an ultralight spin casting rod. Spose to help with casting lightweight stuff - small jigs with ice floats or un-weighted minnows with no float at all. Thinking of having a member here make me a custom job......

For any who have used these:
Whats your oppinion, both good and bad?
Any recomendations on what weight and length flyrod? My thought was a 2wt or 3wt, not sure on length yet.

Maybe an old thread on c.c has talked about this?
Thanks for any help. AF

deathb4disco
01-22-2010, 05:22 PM
I have considered this but have never pulled the trigger. I always talk myself out of it by saying I could just buy a similar spinning rod for a lot less money.

I had a couple of $15 dollar Quantums that did a great job at casting really light baits, but I gave them to some friends. I'm still kicking myself over that. The Bass Pro Microlites also do really well with tiny jigs, and they're only about $40.

I'm assuming you read the article in In-Fisherman about this. That guy was using a 2wt blank from St. Croix (7'.) He was attempting to build another rod on a Sage 1wt blank. Those Sage rods retail for over $500. The blank alone is probably $200, at least.

You might consider a 1, 2 or 3wt blank from Temple Forks. Their blanks are much cheaper.

Ken Jones
01-22-2010, 05:47 PM
Get yourself a 11ft. ULTRALITE rod and put a small spinning reel on it. I use jigs all the time for crappie with crappie niblets under a slipbobber setup. With the slipbobber setup I can controll my depth I'm fishing. Here is a picture of some of the jigs and crappie tubes that I use.
http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk189/kljo2109/Crappie2001.jpg

AtticaFish
01-22-2010, 07:34 PM
DB4D - Thanks, kinda figured it would cost me, I knew what those Sage rods cost. I did read the In-Fish article, but a 7' rod just doesn't seem like it would be a night and day difference from a normal ultralight to justify spending the doe for.

Saw a guy fishing for stocker trout using one and seemed like he could cast a spinner fly a mile with it. His rod really loaded good on his cast. Was the first time I ever saw it and never thought to go ask the guy for some details.



Ken - I'm talking about using either flies or 1/100oz jigs using a very small float to go after bluegill and crappie using some light line, down to 2lb or maybe lighter. I fish some super clear water and need all the help I can to get some spooky fish. ;)

slipbobber
01-23-2010, 05:39 AM
Well I did that very thing, read the "In-Fisherman" article probably still have it. Bought the blank it was about $60 at the time as that was not one of their high dollar blanks. Had to make a handle, real good guides, wrapped 'er up myself nothing fancy just nice rod. When I first got the blank I thought about how nice and light and crisp it felt, you would be amazed how much it changed after adding guides and thread and epoxy, felt more like a wet noodle cast like one too. More of a lob than a cast and sensitivity went some where else. With very light line 1 and 2 pound line you can throw a light jig pretty well but if I'm using 4# and up I much prefer my 7' UL Shimano Compre. I eventually cut 6" off the tip and made a 6'6" rod cast a bit more crisp still very soft parabolic action.

If I were to do it again I would look at some of the new Loomis rods that have the titianium wire guides and try to keep as much weight as possible off the blank, no extra thread and expoxy. All and all it is a fun rod not much in the way of accurate throwing or much controll over a strong fish, once landed about a 10# carp with that rod using 4# Stren High Vis. plum wore me and him out but it was a challenge and I won.

LRB
01-23-2010, 06:17 AM
I have considered this but have never pulled the trigger. I always talk myself out of it by saying I could just buy a similar spinning rod for a lot less money.

I had a couple of $15 dollar Quantums that did a great job at casting really light baits, but I gave them to some friends. I'm still kicking myself over that. The Bass Pro Microlites also do really well with tiny jigs, and they're only about $40.

I'm assuming you read the article in In-Fisherman about this. That guy was using a 2wt blank from St. Croix (7'.) He was attempting to build another rod on a Sage 1wt blank. Those Sage rods retail for over $500. The blank alone is probably $200, at least.

You might consider a 1, 2 or 3wt blank from Temple Forks. Their blanks are much cheaper.


For the price and quality, the Temple Fork rods/blanks are a real bargain !!:)


MaryLou~~

Granite
01-23-2010, 04:59 PM
If you are going light, i would suggest you look into noodle rods. I was from northern Wis. Water clarity was always a problem, you could see down 10-14 ft in some lakes. the rods i used were internatinal match rods and Browning 9' dick swan noodle rods. 2# test clear line a 1/90th ounce flu-flu type jig, thil shy bite floats and spikes. Big gills and crappie was the main catch.

whiskerwhipper
01-23-2010, 07:55 PM
I remember reading something about turning a fly rod blank into a spinning rod. It was from an old (anglers in the photos had bell bottoms and Greg Brady outfits) Hunting and Fishing library book called Fishing Tips and Tricks by Dick Sternbeg. It was mainly used for lobbing light worm and salmon egg baits for trout. Dick recommended using an 8'6 4-5 weight blank. But with rods like Cabelas 9ft Zander rod, Wally Marshall Mighty lite and my personal fav. BnM float n fly with sliding reel seat, using a fly rod blank wouldnt be necessary

PIGINTHEPIGPEN
01-23-2010, 09:16 PM
If you are going light, i would suggest you look into noodle rods. I was from northern Wis. Water clarity was always a problem, you could see down 10-14 ft in some lakes. the rods i used were internatinal match rods and Browning 9' dick swan noodle rods. 2# test clear line a 1/90th ounce flu-flu type jig, thil shy bite floats and spikes. Big gills and crappie was the main catch.

I'm a Big Browning fan, Hunting or Fishing. One of the best rods I ever owned was a Browing Dick Swan Nodle rod. I broke it on my boat cleet. Does anyone know how I can purchase another Noodle rod by Dick Swan?

Prybis
01-23-2010, 09:26 PM
I have actually built 2 of these from 3wt fly rods. Both turned out great and all parts where less than $50. I actually used 2 different blanks. They where both pacific bay blanks that cost around 20 to 25 a piece. One was green the other was black. They where both 7'9" in length. The black blank was more limber than the other.

You could get all the parts for under 50 and build yourself or have someone build it for you. Each blank is going to react different and feel different when built. I gave away the green one as a gift and was the first one I built. The person I gave it broke it about a year latter. He said it was the most sensitive rod he has ever had and wished he still had it.

My other one I built is also very sensitive. I usually use it to cast a 0.8 gram European float with an ice jig or a small fly for bluegill. My intentions was to build a rod like the one in the article from in-fisherman but I have been unable to duplicate it. They also did a follow up on that article which said they extended a 1wt to 7ft but did not mention which blank was used. I did know of a 10' 2 piece 1wt that was going for around $40 but I have yet to decided on another build.

I have noticed that when using very limber or noodle blanks you cast differently. If you try to power the cast at all it will fall short of what you want. It is more of a finesse cast. Let the rod do all the work. Lighter line or small diameter line is also a must. I also believe a larger reel is a must instead of the small UL reels. If you want to have one built by someone you can figure it will be at least $100 more than parts. So if they spend $5o in parts it will cost you $150. Some charge 3 times the price of parts. Just depends on the builder. If interested in building it yourself or learning how to check out rodbuilding.org . It is the best site for rod building info IMHO.

Mike P.

Crappiekiller3
01-23-2010, 11:57 PM
The main reason for using a fly blank for ultra light is to get the slow action
which is lacking in today's blanks. Slow action is great for live bait because you are not tearing baits off casting.The old Fenwick SP721 was a great blank
for that. That used it extensively on Taneycomo for trout. There are a few blanks on the market that are between the slow action and moderate action.
These will give you the "noodle" action on the tip but still have enough backbone to fight fish.
It is true that guides, thread..not so much and epoxy will add weight to the
blank, however modern day guides are much lighter than there predecessors.
It is more important to use ceramic guides with light line than heavier line because light line will groove guides. I prefer fiberglass or composite blanks such as E-glass for this application as graphite is just by nature to fast an action. The higher the modulus the stiffer the blank. And graphite is not forgiving! We've all snapped more graphite blanks than we did fliberglass.

The Lip RIPPERS
01-24-2010, 10:10 AM
AF, 2 ways you can go here. Take a built fly rod and replace the guides with what you want, then remove the plug in the reel seat and add an extension for the butt grip.
Or select a blank and get it built to your specs.

deathb4disco
01-25-2010, 01:45 PM
I prefer fiberglass or composite blanks such as E-glass for this application as graphite is just by nature to fast an action. The higher the modulus the stiffer the blank. And graphite is not forgiving! We've all snapped more graphite blanks than we did fliberglass.

It's too bad fiberglass has pretty much fallen by the wayside. As you mention, it has some good qualities.

It's still used in "big" rods, like catfish and saltwater rods, but rarely in other freshwater fishing. A lot of fly guys like fiberglass a lot, though.