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abarkley
10-03-2005, 06:01 PM
as far as an exact number that adversely affects fishing, what do some of you consider as high pressure on the barometer.

Mo'nBack
10-03-2005, 06:37 PM
I feel it's just like deer hunting, whereas I don't like to see it above 30, and I would like to see it falling anytime I hunt or fish. But I don't let that or the phase of the moon stop me from going when I can. I even crappie fish during east winds, like I'll do tomorrow, and I hardly ever catch fish during a east wind. I don't think there is a magic number on the barometer, especially since the only effect we can have is whether we go or not. I'm not an expert on the barometer or how it affects fish, so please don't let this keep you from forming your own conclusions about it. Hope this helps.

abarkley
10-03-2005, 06:42 PM
I feel it's just like deer hunting, whereas I don't like to see it above 30, and I would like to see it falling anytime I hunt or fish. But I don't let that or the phase of the moon stop me from going when I can. I even crappie fish during east winds, like I'll do tomorrow, and I hardly ever catch fish during a east wind. I don't think there is a magic number on the barometer, especially since the only effect we can have is whether we go or not. I'm not an expert on the barometer or how it affects fish, so please don't let this keep you from forming your own conclusions about it. Hope this helps.

i've fished the high pressure days along with the east wind days myself, and i can tell the difference most definitely. the fish seem to almost lay on the stumps or any other structure for that matter when the pressure is "high". it makes for a long and frustrating day sometimes.

Mo'nBack
10-03-2005, 06:54 PM
i've fished the high pressure days along with the east wind days myself, and i can tell the difference most definitely. the fish seem to almost lay on the stumps or any other structure for that matter when the pressure is "high". it makes for a long and frustrating day sometimes.

I totally agree, but at least I can keep the cobwebbs out of the motor until the day they do bite. :D :D I figure I'll come home frustrated tomorrow, but I can fuss at myself all day while I'm relaxing with my jig pole in my hand! Best of luck to you.

labill
10-03-2005, 07:14 PM
A high barometer is a tough time to fish usually, but if I get the chance to get out on the lake, I'm going to go. It's true that crappie tend to hold tight to deeper cover on a high barometer, but you can catch them if you succeed in finding them. At these times I'd rather use live bait over jigs, but it's usually the only time I do. Even if I strike out, I'll still enjoy the day. For me, it's not all about catching, even though it's great. I'll enjoy the hunt for them.....win or lose. Go if you can, but if you don't you will have missed a day in God's creation. I see it as a chance to "let my brain breathe." No phones, loud music, or distractions. Ya gotta love it!!

chef
10-03-2005, 07:24 PM
We Fish Reelfoot Lake With A Guide Each Year, And He Gives Us An
Option Of Not Going Out If The Wind Is Blowing From The Northeast.
He Says We Won't Catch Any Fish To Speak Of And He Doesnt Want
To Take Our Money When He Is Sure We Are Not Gonna Catch Any Fish.
Chef

FalconSmitty
10-03-2005, 10:11 PM
as far as an exact number that adversely affects fishing, what do some of you consider as high pressure on the barometer.
wWoaH
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v91/FalconSmitty/towelie.jpg

FalconSmitty
10-03-2005, 10:15 PM
We Fish Reelfoot Lake With A Guide Each Year, And He Gives Us An
Option Of Not Going Out If The Wind Is Blowing From The Northeast.
He Says We Won't Catch Any Fish To Speak Of And He Doesnt Want
To Take Our Money When He Is Sure We Are Not Gonna Catch Any Fish.
Chef


Wind out of the EAST fish bite the Least.
Wind out of the west fish bite the BEST!

now where did I hear that...hmm

TAE73
10-04-2005, 05:15 AM
I cant agree with the wind fishing out of the east is the least. I fished Saturday in a Strong easterly wind, and did really well. Caught my limit in 4 hours, with one fish tipping the scale at 1-3/4 pounds! I believe the barometer has alot more to do with it, I think fishing is good as long as it falling or rising. But if its steady seams to always be tougher for me.

Roberta
10-04-2005, 05:22 AM
For us, anything over 30.15 is a killer for the bite, with the exception of trout. I suspect that their longer, slimmer bodies make them a little less sensitive to the air pressure change than the slab-sided members of the sunfish family (crappie, bass, gills, etc.). That's not to say we won't go out, though. We just don't expect to do much. - Roberta

Barnacle Bill
10-04-2005, 06:22 AM
My fishing barometer says the best fishing is between 29.80 and 30.20. I don't know who the wizard was that determined that. Probably someone that has never been fishing in his life. There is only one thing I know for sure about a barometer. If the pressure is dropping fast - GET OFF THE WATER, because a storm is coming.

TAE73
10-04-2005, 07:02 AM
Since we are on the issue of barometric pressure, what is everyone using to get there readings? I am using my weathersense that I bought with my Humminbird Matrix unit. It is nice becuase it will keep track over the last 12 hours the pressure.

Roberta
10-04-2005, 08:20 AM
We have a barometer here in the house that is calibrated to our altitude (critical info when it comes to barometers), plus I check the reading at the Dayton airport on the NOAA site. It will be close enough to give us the general idea of the current trend. BP changes throughout the day and varies by locality. I mostly want to know if it's going up or down and where it is at the time I check it. Looking at the sky can give you a pretty good idea of what's happening, too. - Roberta

SteveJ
10-04-2005, 08:53 AM
I knew better than to go today, NE wind 10 to 15 mph and a bluebird sky, pressure is 30.14 steady. Got the pressure from weather .com so don't know how close that really is to right. I caught 1 9" black and had about 3 little taps. Main thing I really wanted to do was put in my waypts in my new GPS 72. Will need to redo when the wind is lighter and I can hold on top of my stumps etc.

Moose1am
10-04-2005, 09:29 AM
BINGO!. Looking at the sky give you a pretty good idea what's going to happen.

I don't need a barometer to tell me what the sky looks like.

I read where many of you still think that the barometric pressure effects the fish. High Pressure you all say makes the fish get lock jaw. You further state that the fish Hide in the thickest cover available or hang tight to cover.

I'll bet that 99% of the time the fish are in the shady part of the cover or deeper than the sunlight can penetrate well. These fish are hiding not from the barometric pressure but from the SUNLIGHT. The fish just sink a bit lower in the water column and let water filter out the sunlight. In stained water they may only have to go down to ten feet even on a hot summer day at hight noon to get out of the light. Light is dissipated quickly especially in stained or muddy water. Now in very gin clear water they may have to go down to 20ft or 30ft to avoid the direct sunlight at high noon. It all depends on how much light can penetrate though the water.

High pressure days are almost always associated with bright Blue Bird Skies which is why fishing is tough under those conditions. Fish may be hanging on the drops (edge) They can hide there and stay out of the direct sunlight. We all know that when the sun starts to set that the fishing along the bank picks up. The fish are free to roam along the bank without being seen by predators from above as easily as during the daytime. Also the water temps on the surface will cool down a bit at night. You will have a drop in air temps from 100 deg down to around 70 deg or so. That will cool the surface waters a few degrees.


If the air pressure gets up a few hundreds or even tenths of a in on the barometer all the fish have to do is rise up a few feet in the water column to get the pressure on them back to where it was the day before. If the air pressure drops a few tenths of an inch the fish just will drop down a few feet to compensate. It's easy for a fish to move vertically up and down the water column to find the right temp and light conditions. If you read the book "Crappie Wisdom" you will find on page 116 a picture of how the fish may behave on a summer day. At noon the fish are on the bottom of the rock pile. At 6 am the fish are shown suspended at the top of the rock pile and right under the surface. At 9 am the fish are half way down the side of the rock pile. Actually it's a underwater hump. Fish can avoid the bright sunlight and do actually move around to get out of the bright sun. They may move also to compensate for a changing water pressure. We know that when the lakes rise up on a reservoir that crappie may go into the newly flooded areas looking for food. Most of the time the water will be muddy when the lake is rising as most of the time the water levels rise do to the rains. And the rains wash mud and other sediments into the waters. Water color has a lot to do with the fish location.

We know that fish rise up and go deep through out the day due to the increasing and decreasing sunlight. Guys like Al Linder, Dave Csanda, Doug Strange, Ron Linder, Dan Sura, Bob Ripley, Gary Korsgaden, and Steve McCadams along with Rich Zaleski will tell you that in the Crappie Wisdom book. Take their word for it not mine. But I would listen to this guys as they are WORLD RENOUND Fishing pros.

Guys and Gals: Just look at the sky and the trees and the lake and you will know when it's a good time to fish.

Fish bite least when the wind blows from the East. That is because all the bait fish are now on the Windward side of the lake and you are still fishing in the Leeward Side of the lake trying to get out of the wind. The wind blows all the plankton and food downwind and the fish follow the food. East winds normally don't last very long. They are rare in my parts. I had an engineering professor from UE conduct a study on the wind speeds and directions for a project of mine and we found that the winds come from the SW most of the time here. They also come out of the NW a lot too in the summer time. Most easterly winds are not very long lasting and pretty rare. It takes a while for the winds to set up currents in a lake. Bigger lakes will get more wind and thus have more wind produced currents. The longer the winds blow from one direction the more the microscopic food is moved to the windward side of the lake. Winds that blow from the south over a long period will pile up warmer water on the North side of the lake after a while. You'll find the fish there in the spring time. In the summer months the fish will be suspended and in a water temp that they find to their liking.


Just like the wolves follow the bison the fish will follow the shad or bait fish which are following the plankton which are blown about by the winds.

Sure the barometer is ASSOCIATED with the weather change but it's not the PRIMARY thing that effects the fishing IMHO, it's the increased or decreased sunlight caused by wind and waves and clouds. When it clouds up and rains the water is cooled off. Fresh oxygen is put into the lake surface by the falling rain and the mixing casued by the increase in the winds and waves.

Some people don't really understand the cause and effect of things. They focus on one thing and forget the other factors.

I recommend that everyone in here read the second link that Crappie Pappy posted in here today. That article explains very well what I have been trying to explain to you all.

J White
10-04-2005, 10:05 AM
Wind out of the EAST fish bite the Least.
Wind out of the west fish bite the BEST!

now where did I hear that...hmm
Hey man, don't forget the rest of it :) when its from the North, the
fish do come forth - from the South, blows your bait in the fishies' mouth :D

abarkley
10-04-2005, 03:43 PM
BINGO!. Looking at the sky give you a pretty good idea what's going to happen.

I don't need no stinking barometer to tell me what the sky looks like.

I read where many of you still think that the barrometric pressure effects the fish. High Pressure you all say makes the fish get lock jaw. You further state that the fish Hide in the thickest cover avaliable or hang tight to cover.

I'll bet that 99% of the time the fish are in the shady part of the cover or deeper than the sunlight can penetrate well. These fish are hiding not from the barrometric pressure but from the SUNLIGHT.

High pressure days are almost always associated with bright Blue Bird Skies.

If the air pressure gets up a few hundreds or even tenths of a in on the barometer all the fish have to do is rise up a few feet in the water column to get the pressure on them back to where it was the day before.

We know that fish rise up and go deep through out the day due to the increasing and decreasing sunlight.

Guys and Gals: Just look at the sky and the trees and the lake and you will know when it's a good time to fish.

Fish bite least when the wind blows from the East. That is because all the bait fish are now on the Windward side of the lake and you are still fishing in the Leeward Side of the lake trying ot get out of the wind. The wind blows all the plankton and food downwind and the fish follow the food.

Just like the wolves follow the bison.

Sure the barrometer is ASSOCIATED with the weather change but it's not what effects the fishing IMHO, it's the increased or decreased sunlight caused by wind and waves and clouds.


but not on my home lake. i've fished days when the wind is out of the east, and i've fished the windy part as well as the calm part with limited success compared to days when a prevailing south or west wind blows. we pull jigs about 99.9 % of the time in the winter and spring and cover a whole helluva lot of water too. i've got to go ahead and disagree with you on this one.

Cane Pole
10-04-2005, 05:06 PM
Hi pressure good weather. Low pressure bad weather. It is all relative to the surrounding air pressure. Here is a good link to wind/barometeric (air) pressure.

Me, I got enough metal in me body to let me know What's going On . haha


http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wfbarrow.htm

1weezer
10-04-2005, 05:19 PM
Moose, I hate to disagree with you, but the pressure DOES make a difference. What book do you get all your info from? And what ever the direction of the wind, has little or no effect on if the fish are going to bite or not. Out of all the old wise tails I have heard, the one about if the cows are all laying down the fish won't bite. That becomes true more times than not. Look at the wild life. If you see a lot of the animals feeding, then more than likely the fish will be feeding too.
OK got that out of my system.

Cane Pole
10-04-2005, 05:28 PM
Moose, I hate to disagree with you, but the pressure DOES make a difference. What book do you get all your info from? And what ever the direction of the wind, has little or no effect on if the fish are going to bite or not. Out of all the old wise tails I have heard, the one about if the cows are all laying down the fish won't bite. That becomes true more times than not. Look at the wild life. If you see a lot of the animals feeding, then more than likely the fish will be feeding too.
OK got that out of my system.

Fish ain't out of the water so they dont know the wind is blowing, but the sure feel the air pressure changes. You rite, cows down, fish will not bite. Just ask me cow.

Jerry Blake
10-04-2005, 06:30 PM
as far as an exact number that adversely affects fishing, what do some of you consider as high pressure on the barometer.

Hey Abarkley:

From my experience - being on the water about 300 days a year - crappie bite better overall when the pressure is under 30.20 and steady or falling slowly like it normally does when a front is approaching than when it is rising like it normally does after a front passes, especially when it gets over 30.20.

Crappie can bite very well in bright sunshine well above the top of our brushpiles before a front comes through.

Like today for example – not a cloud in the sky and we caught good crappie over brushpiles far away from any shade right up until we finished the trip around noon - there's a front approaching, which will pass through late tomorrow.

After a front comes through and the pressure begins to rise they will generally be less aggressive - even if it is cloudy - even in the shade - even before the sun is up or down.

I think it's instinct. When a front comes through there is a good chance there will be rain and the water may rise and scatter their food source and possibly get muddy, which may make it difficult to locate food for a few days. That's a pretty good reason to go on a feeding binge.

Then I suspect that once they feed aggressively for a few days they don't have to feed as much for a day or two - whether or not the passing front actually disturbed their habitat or not. But I think most fish feed at sometime every day – just more aggressively some days than others and at certain times of day than others.

If you have a choice of days to fish – before or after a front – I would go the day or two before rather than a day or two after.

But like others mentioned I wouldn’t stay home just because a front has passed and the pressure is rising. Just plan on fishing slower and deeper with smaller bait and expect the bite to be light and you can still get a good mess of fish.

Here are some links I use to get an idea of what to expect on any given day.

http://www.weather.com/maps/maptype/currentweatherusnational/index_large.html

http://image.weather.com/images/maps/forecast/amfcst_720x486.jpg

http://image.weather.com/images/maps/forecast/midfcst_720x486.jpg

http://image.weather.com/images/maps/forecast/pmfcst_720x486.jpg

Enter your state on this one and select a reporting station near you to get the 24-hour temp and barometer trend - http://weather.noaa.gov/

You could put some crappie in an aquarium and wait to feed them until the pressure is high and assume that because they attack the minnows when you drop them in the tank and then quit feeding when you turn on the aquarium light that it is only light that affects how they feed.

But then you would only want to fish on cloudy days or very early or very late in the day or only where there is shade and you would miss out on a lot of opportunities to catch fish.

If you fish regularly, watch the weather changes and try a variety of approaches under all weather conditions you’ll learn to adjust and catch a mess of fish every time you go.

abarkley
10-04-2005, 06:47 PM
thanks mr. blake for the good post

1weezer
10-04-2005, 06:49 PM
Very good write up Jerry. I agree. I am getting a new gps/depth finder with a Barometer in it. Can't wait to see the trends.

Eager Beaver
10-04-2005, 07:48 PM
I go whenever I get a chance to go fishing. The only thing that keeps me from fishing is the wind if it is blowing pretty hard. Then I will fish off a dock if I can. My wife insist that I have someone with me after I had the Triple-by-pass. She doesn't want me out in the boat by myself. I generally don't have too much trouble finding someone to go with me.

Moose1am
10-04-2005, 10:59 PM
High Pressures in North America have a CLOCKWISE Circulation of the air around the high pressure ridge. It all depends on where you are RELATIVE to the center of the High pressure as to what the wind direction will be. If you are to the west of the high pressure the wind will be blowing one way and when the high pressure passes you by and is to the East of your position the winds will come from the other direction.

Winds make the water's surface choppy and this reduces the amount of sunlight that can penetrate deep into the water. The waves reflect a lot of the sunlight off the water's surface. The clouds block out the sun and that can bring the fish into shallow water.

The bright sunlight forces the fish to seek some shade. Fish will be tight to cover and not wanting to eat.

Fish bite best as the light gets dimmer. That is why the early hours of the day and around dusk are some of the best fishing times. Crappie also bite at night as we all know. Most animals need some sleep or rest. I suspect that fish sleep or rest also. They can't feed all day long 24/7.

Now each lake is different. But the wind and waves are present in most lakes of any size. And cloud cover effects large and small lakes.

I would think that most of the time when the wind comes out of the EAST it's not a gentle breeze, but instead a pretty strong wind. That makes boat control hard to maintain. We know that boat speed or lure speed is very important to catching crappie. Go too fast and you won't get bit some days.Go to slow and the same thing can happen other days. Depth is critical also. When the winds blow at 15mph it makes it hard to maintain the boat over a good spot. And controlling the depth of the baits and the speed of the baits gets much harder.

I catch a lot of fish in the late evening. Most of the time in the summer the winds die down as the sun starts to set. That makes controlling the boat easier and makes it simple to hover over a brush pile. I can't do that when the winds blow 20mph.

I know that the fish will be on the windy side of the lake but when the winds get too high I head for a protected cove to fish.

I guess what I am getting at is that there are many factors that all go into controlling where the fish will be and what mood they will be in. Time of day, amount of sunlight, winds (dir and speed). It's hard to separate all the variables out and say that just one effects the fish more than the others. It's the total picture that effects the fish. That is why it's so hard to really figure out.

It's easy to measure the air pressure and not so easy to measure the winds speeds and directions when out on the lake. We don't take anemometers out on the lake with us. So it's easier to associate the fish not biting with a barometer reading. But the real culprit is the 100% blue bird skies and the rising temp or the dropping water temps. The thing is that all these factors happen at the same time. We get high pressure with blue bird skies. So it's easy to associate both the high press and the blue bird skies with the fish not biting so good.

I think it the lighting that effects the fishing. More light fish tight to cover and deeper or along shady drops. Less light and the fish scatter and can go into shallower water.

There are other factors too. such as the location of the fish's food (prey) and the location of the bigger fish (Northern Pike, Muskie, LM Bass and or Big Stripers) that can scare away the smaller fish (crappie)

It's ok to associate high pressure to the other factors as they are indeed associated with each other. I just think that the pressure alone is not why the fish don't bite. I think its due to the changing light conditions dropping air temperatures and water temperatures. Less sunlight and the water will begin to cool off. Heat is lost quickly from the air when the sunlight is blocked by the clouds. There is a lot of solar energy radiated off the top of the clouds. The air temp in the shade can be 10 deg F cooler than in the direct sunlight. Plus you bring in colder air and rain and that will further cool the water. We all should know that fish are definitely effected by water temperatures and changes in the water temperatures especially when the fish are going into the shallow waters or feeding at the surface. At the deeper depths the fish are insulated from the changes better. Water temps vary thoughout the day in the shallows because of the sunlight variations. And after a front passes though the skies clear up and the clouds are all gone. That night the heat energy is dissipated out into space more readily. That is because there are not clouds to block the radiation of the heat back out into space from the earth's surface. That further cools the water temperature especially in the shallows where most bank fishermen and most inexperienced fishermen try to catch fish. The fish will be driven off the banks and back down the point to seek more comfortable and stable water temperatures. The next day you will find bright sunny clear blue skies and cooler air and water tempertures that morning. I think that bright skies spook the fish because they know that they can be seen from above more easily. Especially if there is little wind and the surface of the lake is like glass. Predators such as Eagles flying overhead are a major natural threat to fish in shallow water. The fish have grown up with an inate fear and will seek cover on bright sunny days. Cover could simple be just sinking a bit deeper in the water and suspending out off from a drop off in the summertime. It depends on the water clarity as to how deep the fish may sink. Or they may seek the comfort of a dock where they are hidden and the water temps in the shade of the dock are more to their liking.






but not on my home lake. I've fished days when the wind is out of the east, and i've fished the windy part as well as the calm part with limited success compared to days when a prevailing south or west wind blows. we pull jigs about 99.9 % of the time in the winter and spring and cover a whole helluva lot of water too. i've got to go ahead and disagree with you on this one.

papasage
10-05-2005, 03:32 AM
i read a artickle on high preasure. it said that with high preasure the fish would feel full from the presureon their body . low preasure that they could expand the stomack and they could eat more . sound reasonable to me. like baloon will probable git bigger in low preasure then git smaller when the preasure is high . never tried it know it wil with heat.

frank lawhead
10-05-2005, 06:20 AM
what kind of sounder/gps you getting ?

Mo'nBack
10-05-2005, 08:15 AM
I agree with alot of what Moose says and it seems you have drawn conclusions based on alot of facts and experience (and it makes alot of sense). What I don't understand are the places I fish like yesterday. A cutoff that goes from one river to a lake. The lake has a dam and is drained every year down to nothing thus draining both rivers I fish in. The tops of the banks are 20ft+ and the river gets down to about 30yds wide. Average depth is 12ft. The lake is down to 2-5ft deep, so it's out. In the river I fish, you can't feel the wind at all. Every year the fish always start biting when the sun is straight up (passed the high banks) except when there is an east wind like yesterday. I've caught big fish there in the middle of the day for 3 months until yesterday when we had an east wind (that I couldn't feel and there is never a ripple or is it hard to hold a boat.) I kept 11 fish just big enough to keep and throwed back 50+ dinks. I went to the main river and tried deep, under and around structure,fast and slow, and even shallow---nothing. This is like this on all the waterways here and have been all my life with an east wind(even if it's just a light breeze) but especially is prevelent on the river from yesterday. I know it's hard to draw conclusions on just what I write, but any thoughts to help me catch fish would be greatly appreciated.

gary
10-05-2005, 09:52 AM
The moose got it right and as usual Jerry caught the fish. Gary I

TAE73
10-05-2005, 09:55 AM
My only other thought is I could care less which way the wind is blowing and what the barometric pressure is because I am still going to go fishing.

Darryl Morris
10-05-2005, 01:53 PM
Hmmm, seems we've all been here before. Obviously, there are many, many elements that can be factored into what makes for a good fishing day and what doesn't.

Moose, sorry, I have to disagree with you. Your opinion about barametric pressure is like saying the sun has no effect on air temperature. You are arguing symptoms that can effect fishing and ignoring the source of all the symptoms. The barametric pressure rising and falling is the source by which we can gauge all the symptoms (a coming or passing cold front [low pressure] or warm front [high pressure] wind speed, wind direction, amount of sunlight, cloud cover, etc.)

If it's just wind and sunlight, then why did I catch 12 hawg'in slabs today in a light to moderate easterly wind with a cloudless sky and very bright sun. Certainly, the wind didn't move the fish (predator or prey) out of the brushpiles. Plus, I caught crappie on all sides (shade and not) of the brushpile, with or without my boat's shadow in it and not. So, Moose, be a good guy, come and join the rest of us, we promise to play nice, lol.

Barametric pressure is certainly key. From there we fish in some or all the symptoms associated with that particular pressure. Some days are fast and some are slow, but they're all good. But anyway, that's just my opinion for whatever it's worth in light of the nearly 1,700 fish caught, kept and cleaned so far this year.

J White
10-05-2005, 02:30 PM
My only other thought is I could care less which way the wind is blowing and what the barometric pressure is because I am still going to go fishing.
I'll say "amen" to that, Ted, and you signature too! Fishin' when it's tough
just makes you a better fisherman - builds character :p But as for watchin'
this discussion, I'm gonna have to say I put more stock in nearly 1700
fish caught than "type a mile-a-minute" ;)

1weezer
10-05-2005, 03:01 PM
You go Darryl! Agree with you all the way. The proof is is in the pudding. Or should I say the live well at the end of the day. Not a book you read by some one that has never fished very much.
Talk to any guide and they will tell you that pressure one way or the other plays a very BIG roll in the amount of fish you catch.

Moose1am
10-05-2005, 03:45 PM
When I get ready to go night fishing I take the Flash light and the Fishing Lights. I won't leave home without the LIGHTS

Sunlight drives the earths weather not the other way around.

Moose1am
10-05-2005, 03:48 PM
I use my Garmin eTrax Vista GPS to check the barrometric air pressure. I can track the air pressure over a 12 hour period of time.

I use the unit's earth and moon position page more than I do the Air Pressure page.



Since we are on the issue of barometric pressure, what is everyone using to get there readings? I am using my weathersense that I bought with my Humminbird Matrix unit. It is nice becuase it will keep track over the last 12 hours the pressure.

Moose1am
10-05-2005, 03:59 PM
It's critical to Airplanes to have a properly calibated barrometer in the air craft. That is how must aircraft determine their altitude.


If they got a reading from the airport and set the planes barrometer wrong they could end up flying into the ground.

Airports give the air pressure readings to the pilots that are corrected for the airports elevation above Mean Sea Level.

Now if your airport is on flat land right next to the ocean then your going to be ok. But if your airport is at 4000ft above msl then you better get the altitude corrected reading from your airport.



We have a barometer here in the house that is calibrated to our altitude (critical info when it comes to barometers), plus I check the reading at the Dayton airport on the NOAA site. It will be close enough to give us the general idea of the current trend. BP changes throughout the day and varies by locality. I mostly want to know if it's going up or down and where it is at the time I check it. Looking at the sky can give you a pretty good idea of what's happening, too. - Roberta

Moose1am
10-05-2005, 04:43 PM
I do agree that the weather effects the fishermen more than the fish. LOL


Hi pressure good weather. Low pressure bad weather. It is all relative to the surrounding air pressure. Here is a good link to wind/barometeric (air) pressure.

Me, I got enough metal in me body to let me know What's going On . haha


http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wfbarrow.htm

Cane Pole
10-05-2005, 05:16 PM
Interesting here, now the true story...I have said this before...Fish just like us..
Bad weather (storm coming in) most of us stays home, watch some tv and snack some. Good weather, we out roaming around, not watching much tube, and not snacking so much. Now fish do the same thing. The stays at home and watch some fish tv, and snack. That is why we can catch them when the fronts move in. They at home, and ready to snack. Now let the weather get good, they out crusing, not really interested in snacking too much.

Now as far as setting aircraft altimeters, I know that the military sets it's baro at 29.95 ( I calibrated the A/C altimeters at Pacific Missle Range, Point Mugu, Cal.). Thats bout 80 foot above sea level. I think that the true mean at sea level is 29.92. Computers do the rest. Now, this was last century... I doubt seriously that these numbers have changed....

Tom

Moose1am
10-05-2005, 05:18 PM
Jerry: You got the part about the aquarium mixed up. It's like this:
Don't feed the crappie for several days to make sure that they will be hungry... very hungry. Now turn on the bright aquarium lights and drop in some small minnows. Watch to see if the crappie will feed.

Do the same thing as above but leave the bright aquarium lights turned off and then feed the hungry crappie. The crappie will start to feed almost immediately

Now everything else you said I will agree with. The weather effects the fishing. Never said that it didn't.

But the air pressure does not effect the fish. Hell the water pressure is the only thing that the fish can sense about the changing air pressure above the lake.

Fish can sense light and dark. They have eyes.They can sense the water pressure surrounding them. They have nerves along the skin and under the skin. Fish can sense water temperature changes. They have specialized nerve endings that feel cold and hot. I even agree that the fish can be responding to coming changes due to a coming front. But a front is more than changing air pressure. Changing air pressure is just one part of the coming weather changes.





When I see a fish climbing out of the water and into Moose's boat holding a Barrometer in it's as* I'll agree to change my mind on this subject.

Jerry Blake
10-05-2005, 05:56 PM
Hey Moose:

I doubt anyone here is concerned whether you change your mind or not. :) I am concerned that someone might to get the impression that they can't catch crappie when the sun is shining unless they fish in the shade.

I’ll make my observations on the feeding habits of crappie in their natural setting rather than on starved crappie in an aquarium – it’s been working pretty well for me.

It seems odd that the old timers used to make a device out of a Mason Jar and a Coke bottle to monitor changes in barometric pressure and the fishing electronics companies are now offering devices that sense changes in barometric pressure if there is no correlation between those changes and how aggressively fish will bite.

Moose1am
10-05-2005, 05:59 PM
Hmmm, seems we've all been here before. Obviously, there are many, many elements that can be factored into what makes for a good fishing day and what doesn't.

Moose, sorry, I have to disagree with you. Hey I don't mind you disagreeing with me. Your opinion about barametric pressure is like saying the sun has no effect on air temperature. No I never said that, In fact I said just the opposite. Show me where I ever said that.

You are arguing symptoms that can effect fishing and ignoring the source of all the symptoms. No I am not ignoring the source which is the sun. The barametric pressure rising and falling is the source by which we can gauge all the symptoms (a coming or passing cold front [low pressure] Stop right here. or warm front [high pressure] wind speed, wind direction, amount of sunlight, cloud cover, etc.) You are right in that the barrometer is used as a gauge or tool. But the tool does not make the weather. The sun's energy drives the wind the rain (evaporation) and the clouds. Air pressure changes are just the effects of differential heating and cooling of the earth's air and surfaces.

If it's just wind and sunlight, Never said it was just the wind and light but I said those were some of the major factors the effect the earth and the fish. then why did I catch 12 hawg'in slabs today in a light to moderate easterly wind with a cloudless sky and very bright sun. Because you were in the right spot at the right time and feed the fish something that they would eat.Certainly, the wind didn't move the fish (predator or prey) out of the brushpiles. Not all fish move out of the brush piles when the sunlight is bright. In fact they should want to hide in the brush piles or stick close to the tree trucks of submerged trees. Maybe the reason those fish hit your baits was because they were hungry. Maybe the wind did blow the prey away and that is why they were hungry. Bright light is a relative term. Night fishermen will tell you that they catch a lot of their fish at the edge of the underwater light beams. Plus, I caught crappie on all sides (shade and not) of the brushpile, with or without my boat's shadow in it and not. So, Moose, be a good guy, come and join the rest of us, we promise to play nice, lol. Hey I always play nice. LOL! Darrly I know you can adapt to different weather and still catch fish. I am sure that you have many brush piles in your lake that you can sooner or later find fish on them. Do you fish different brush piles at differnet times of the year or with different water levels? I bet that you do. Now how bright was that sun this day and how deep did you fish. What was the water color ie was it cyrstal clear, stained or muddy? How long had the wind been blowing in any direction? You know it takes time for the wind to setup currents in a lake and move the bait fish to a new section of the lake. My experiences around where I live is that the wind does not continue to blow out of the east very long. Most of our prevailing winds come out of the southwest and north east. Only for a small time does the pressure systems get into a position to give me East Winds. And they don't blow out of the east long enough to really change the lake currents.

Barametric pressure is certainly key. It's a key measurement but I would not call it the key factor in effecting the fish. From there we fish in some or all the symptoms associated with that particular pressure. Now you are talking! refering to the preceeding text in green. Good fisheremen adapt to the changing winds, temp and cloud cover ie the weather not the air pressure. Besides fish don't feel the air pressure changes. They may sense some changes in the water pressure around them but they won't know what that is caused by. It could be that the lake level was rising a few inche/hr too. Do you agree that rising water levels effects the fish? I think it does. What about fish in a river environment. Do they sense the changing air pressure too? Not as much as the water pressure from the rivers currents. How would a brush pile protect the fish from high pressure systems or even low pressure systems? The brush pile give the fish a place to hide from bigger fish and their prey. It's their home.



but actually it's the conditions associated with the changing weather system. Now you are talking! Green text that is Some days are fast and some are slow, but they're all good. I agree 100%!

But anyway, that's just my opinion for whatever it's worth in light of the nearly 1,700 fish caught, kept and cleaned so far this year. I am sure that you can catch fish mate. In fact I bet you adapt your fishing according to the changing weather conditions :) Glad you are good at fishing. You know where the fish will be most days on your home lake where you have put out lots of brush piles and crappie condos.

Moose1am
10-05-2005, 06:21 PM
Well why didn't you say that sooner? :)

Sure you can catch fish when the sun is shinning brightly. Just fish a bit deeper or find some stained water. Not all lakes have shade available.

But you would think that brush piles such as bamboo types provide some shade when the sun is at certain angles.

If the water is muddy there is always sufficient shade available to the fish right? Even stained water provided protection from a bright sun in July.

Fish just need to go a bit deep to reduce the amount of light reaching them.

Jerry you fish Hamilton and that other lake Greeson something. Right? Those lakes are not crystal clear lakes like say Dale Hollow. They surely have some color to them. Make like KY lake does. Visibility is maybe two to five feet at best? You can't see down 50ft into the water at Hamilton high?

I sure hope that I have not given the impression that all the fish are hiding in the shade under Darryl's boat. LOL

You know where the fish are going to be. I never would doubt your or Darryl's or even 1Weezers ability to catch crappy.

My main concern is that everyone not think that just measuring the air pressure is the be all to end all.

The best thing that we fishermen have going for us is that thing called a brain that sits under our caps.

I want people to think about what drives the fish and not just blame things on the air pressure. A fish would have to jump out of the water to sense the air pressure.

By now you should know me well enough to realize that my pet peeve is this air pressure debate. :(

I won't comment on the part about your observations just to say you are not able to control the variables out in the outdoors. The only way to control and equalize all the variables is under controlled conditions.

I know one of those old timers. He had one of those coke bottles filled with water and put upside down inside a metal coffee can filled with water. I was 8 years old and learned about those homemade barrometers before you were born. I also know that the same guy that make that barometer use to drink a lot of home brew whisky too. LOL Man you are bring back vivid memories of that barometer sitting on the counter top in the office at the fishing camp's office. I can still see all the fishing stuff sitting on the walls behind that counter in my mind.

I think you and I both agree that the weather effects the fishing not the barometer. The barometer is just a tool that is used to predict the weather. We have other tools that can predict the weather. Like our eyes and ears and the thing that sits between our ears.

The fishin industry will sell anything to anyone if it makes them some money. It does not really have to work. Tell me this. When you bought your gps did you get it for finding your brush piles mainly or for telling your what the barometer was reading?

Too many varialbes .. not enough time!




Hey Moose:

I doubt anyone here is concerned whether you change your mind or not. :) I am concerned that someone might to get the impression that they can't catch crappie when the sun is shining unless they fish in the shade.

I’ll make my observations on the feeding habits of crappie in their natural setting rather than on starved crappie in an aquarium – it’s been working pretty well for me.

It seems odd that the old timers used to make barometers out of a Mason Jar and a Coke bottle and the fishing electronics companies are now offering devices that sense changes in barometric pressure if there is no correlation between those changes and how aggressively fish will bite.

Jerry Blake
10-05-2005, 06:31 PM
Hey Moose:

I know this "Pressure" thing is your pet peeve - it's you against the fishing establishment!!! :)

Let's see if we can agree on these two statements.

“Weather patterns and changes affect how aggressively crappie bite on any given day or time of day.”

Agree or disagree?

“Monitoring Barometric Pressure is a useful tool in predicting weather patterns and changes.”

Agree or disagree?

Moose1am
10-05-2005, 06:36 PM
Agree


Agree

Seems like we are on the same page again.



Hey Moose:

I know this "Pressure" thing is your pet peeve - it's you against the fishing establishment!!! :)

Let's see if we can agree on these two statements.

“Weather patterns and changes affect how aggressively crappie bite on any given day or time of day.”

Agree or disagree?

“Monitoring Barometric Pressure is a useful tool in predicting weather patterns and changes.”

Agree or disagree?

Jerry Blake
10-05-2005, 06:44 PM
OK - now we're getting somewhere!!!!!!!!!!!!!


If “Weather patterns and changes affect how aggressively crappie bite on any given day or time of day” and “Monitoring Barometric Pressure is a useful tool in predicting weather patterns and changes” then monitoring Barometric Pressure is a useful tool in predicting how aggressively crappie will bite on any given day or time of day!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

If X=Y and Y=Z then X=Z!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Mo'nBack
10-05-2005, 06:52 PM
Checkmate! :D

1weezer
10-05-2005, 06:54 PM
Jerry: You got the part about the aquarium mixed up. It's like this:
Don't feed the crappie for several days to make sure that they will be hungry... very hungry. Now turn on the bright aquarium lights and drop in some small minnows. Watch to see if the crappie will feed.

Do the same thing as above but leave the bright aquarium lights turned off and then feed the hungry crappie. The crappie will start to feed almost immediately

Now everything else you said I will agree with. The weather effects the fishing. Never said that it didn't.

But the air pressure does not effect the fish. Hell the water pressure is the only thing that the fish can sense about the changing air pressure above the lake.

Fish can sense light and dark. They have eyes.They can sense the water pressure surrounding them. They have nerves along the skin and under the skin. Fish can sense water temperature changes. They have specialized nerve endings that feel cold and hot. I even agree that the fish can be responding to coming changes due to a coming front. But a front is more than changing air pressure. Changing air pressure is just one part of the coming weather changes.





When I see a fish climbing out of the water and into 1Weezers boat holding a Barrometer in it's as* I'll agree to change my mind on this subject.


Moose, I have not mentioned any names in any of my post. But since you want to call names, I will say this. It don't matter if you change your mind about any thing on this board or not. No one really cares. Most people know where you get your info from.
Now, leave my name out of your posts. Thanks

abarkley
10-05-2005, 07:21 PM
[QUOTE=Moose1am]Well why didn't you say that sooner? :)



My main concern is that everyone not think that just measuring the air pressure is the be all to end all.

The best thing that we fishermen have going for us is that thing called a brain that sits under our caps.

I want people to think about what drives the fish and not just blame things on the air pressure. A fish would have to jump out of the water to sense the air pressure.



i didnt start this thread because i thought that air pressure is the be all end all. i started it because i was wondering when people thought high pressure started adversely affecting fish behavior if it even does. i do feel like this is a variable along with certain other things such as current and water temp and a bunch of other things and so do some other fishermen on this forum. man i'm just trying to figure this fishing thing out like everyone else. i'm not making excuses. no one's harder on me than me after a bad day of fishing or a good day for that matter. i go back over everything from picking the right spot to picking the right time and day to losing fish at the boat to picking the right jig colors. i'm trying to become a better fisherman. i've been crappie fishing for only 5 years and i'm lucky to get 30-40 days a year on the water. when you get one day a week to fish, sometimes you got to pick the right day, and then again sometimes you got to take what mother nature gives you like it or not. i'm just looking for some experienced answers to some questions i have.

Moose1am
10-05-2005, 07:22 PM
Sure but it's NOT THE ONLY TOOL!

Do you only use the barrometric pressure to help you determine where and when to fish your lake?



OK - now we're getting somewhere!!!!!!!!!!!!!


If “Weather patterns and changes affect how aggressively crappie bite on any given day or time of day” and “Monitoring Barometric Pressure is a useful tool in predicting weather patterns and changes” then monitoring Barometric Pressure is a useful tool in predicting how aggressively crappie will bite on any given day or time of day!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

If X=Y and Y=Z then X=Z!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Jerry Blake
10-05-2005, 07:35 PM
Hey Abarkley:

Did I answer your original question? I was trying to but got distracted - sorry. Feel free to PM me or email me if you have any other questions. I realize it's tough to get out there and catch fish when you haven't been on the water in a while.

Jerry Blake
10-05-2005, 07:39 PM
Uh Moose:

You're wasting my time.

Darryl Morris
10-05-2005, 08:05 PM
Aah Duh, there you go again Jerry, using your brain under your cap. See, I told you that's dangerous, lol. It didn't do any good, lol. Absolutely amazing, isn't it? See ya on the water tomorrow!

Oh, just for reference, air pressure does effect the water and all things under it's surface. Perhaps we all could ask all those millions of folks who have been affected by Katrina and Rita how much that record-breaking low "air" pressure created a surge of water that destroyed both life and limb. Hmmm.

abarkley
10-05-2005, 08:25 PM
Hey Abarkley:

Did I answer your original question? I was trying to but got distracted - sorry. Feel free to PM me or email me if you have any other questions. I realize it's tough to get out there and catch fish when you haven't been on the water in a while.


yep, i appreciate the in depth answer.

Moose1am
10-05-2005, 08:47 PM
yea you are probably right. You are better off wasting your time in the Chat room.

DENNIS BOWERS
10-06-2005, 03:16 AM
abarkly-Its my opinion through trial and error that the Barometer does affect Fish & all wildlife!!I still fish regardless but catch rates are alot better with a falling barometer.Just my 2 cents worth!!

CrappiePappy
10-06-2005, 03:25 AM
THIS THREAD WILL BE LOCKED FROM FURTHER COMMENTS, UNLESS THE MEMBERS INVOLVED AGREE TO DISAGREE WITHOUT FURTHER INNUENDO OR PROVOCATIVE REMARKS.

and just so you all know that you are all correct, in part ... but not in total, on your "opinions" of Barometric Pressure and its effect (or lack thereof) --

http://www.quickoneplus.com/fish/barometric.htm


http://www.midcurrent.com/articles/techniques/ross_pressure_myth.aspx



.............cp

Moose1am
10-06-2005, 07:08 AM
That second link that you posted is explains exactly what I was trying to tell everyone. Thanks for finding and posting that link.




THIS THREAD WILL BE LOCKED FROM FURTHER COMMENTS, UNLESS THE MEMBERS INVOLVED AGREE TO DISAGREE WITHOUT FURTHER INNUENDO OR PROVOCATIVE REMARKS.

and just so you all know that you are all correct, in part ... but not in total, on your "opinions" of Barometric Pressure and its effect (or lack thereof) --

http://www.quickoneplus.com/fish/barometric.htm


http://www.midcurrent.com/articles/techniques/ross_pressure_myth.aspx



.............cp

Darryl Morris
10-06-2005, 10:47 AM
That second link that you posted is explains exactly what I was trying to tell everyone. Thanks for finding and posting that link.

There is a difference in "subsurface" pressure(s) in fresh and saltwater. Consider the fact that a person floats more easily in the denser saltwater than in freshwater. Therefore, a barametric change (and all the weather condition that might be associated with that barametric change) will have less of an influence in saltwater and a relatively great influence in freshwater.

My father lives in Port Isabel, TX, fishing as often as I do in the Laguna Madre (another proof's in the pudd'in man), and lives next door to several saltwater/bay fishing guides. Everyone of them have barameters hanging on their dock and have sophisticated electronics that produce sonar imagry, GPS mapping and, yes, historic barametric pressure. Plus, each and every sea-going, gulf shrimp boat I have ever visited has equipment to measure and record barametric pressure. Oh well, guess all those old salts who have been on the sea their whole life and afford us all great dinner each time we go to
Red Lobster are just being misled. I wouldn't want to tell them that the next time I'm having a cold one with them when I get to South Texas. They'd probably be tempted to tatoo the tip of your nose just for the fun of it, lol. Semper Fi.

CrappiePappy
10-06-2005, 10:53 AM
but, also take into consideration --- the first link allows that both "light" and "barometric pressure" have an influence on "fishing", fish activity, feeding activity, etc., but neither are the "single" most influence. All are a "part" of the overall dynamics.

I think you all are saying the same thing .. but from different perspectives. That's why I don't debate "opinions", even from "experts". ......... cp :cool:

Jerry Blake
10-06-2005, 11:49 AM
That second link that you posted is explains exactly what I was trying to tell everyone. Thanks for finding and posting that link.

Oh, I thought we were talking about freshwater crappie fishing and I didn't notice anyone suggest that "barometric pressure alone can trigger the sudden bite" or that changes in barometric pressure is the ONLY factor in the feeding habits of crappie.

I wonder if Dr. David Ross - scientist emeritus at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution - has ever caught a crappie.

By the way, a cold front passed through here during the night and the pressure has been rising since 6:00am. Darryl and Jim did some scouting for a while this morning before we went to work sinking three more bamboo crappie condos and they caught one crappie and one white bass. Darryl and I have both been catching good numbers of quality crappie all week in stable weather with full sunshine every day and then for some odd reason - even though it was very overcast and there was a light breeze on the water this morning - the crappie got lock-jaw.

Since it happens all the time I don't guess it's coincidence.

Jerry Blake
10-06-2005, 11:54 AM
yea you are probably right. You are better off wasting your time in the Chat room.

Actually I haven't felt I've wasted any time in the chat room since you quit posting there.

Darryl Morris
10-06-2005, 12:35 PM
Well, I'll take the "expert opinion" from anyone with the "actual experience" any day. And this is coming from a man with two bachelors degrees, plus another 100+ hours and thousands of books under his belt. Guess I've never learned a thing in my life. Nothing will ever beat real life experience and OJT. Too bad our society has turned overly collegate and forgotten the Master/Apprentice relationship.

Story Time: My uncle is a physics professor in New Mexico. His sunken bathroom flooded and he was trying to cyphen the water out of the floor into the sink. After and hour or two trying he finally just drilled a hole in the floor and let the water run into the crawlspace. I wonder what an experienced plumber would have done? Don't know, but I bet'cha if there were crappie in that bathroom with a slowly falling barametric pressure, I'd catch'em, lol.

J White
10-06-2005, 02:08 PM
Quote-
By the way, a cold front passed through here during the night and the pressure has been rising since 6:00am. Darryl and Jim did some scouting for a while this morning before we went to work sinking three more bamboo crappie condos and they caught one crappie and one white bass. Darryl and I have both been catching good numbers of quality crappie all week in stable weather with full sunshine every day and then for some odd reason - even though it was very overcast and there was a light breeze on the water this morning - the crappie got lock-jaw.

Since it happens all the time I don't guess it's coincidence.[/QUOTE]

Makes me feel a little better to see it still happens sometimes to the pro's
too - but on the other hand, dashes my hopes of someday figuring them out
every day, every time :) I've got no barometer, or idea what is really happening, but several time it has been bright and sunny, catching the fool
out of them, then mid-day, it's like a haze settles on the lake - looks foggy
looking several miles down open water - and they just QUIT, at least for me.

fishingpox
10-06-2005, 02:37 PM
Well this post as been a darn good read and points made by many people. I'm old school, I'll take experience any day over book learning. Once I've made my decesion to go fishing only a 30 mph wind will keep me off the lake, if I'm trolling. I don't have the knowledge to contribute to the conversati0on, but ,I do know several times last spring during spawn, on very sun shiny days,I fished my favorite tree top and the water was murky and did not catch a thing till I found clearer water. I have no clue has to why, I just know to move alot and change colors. That is the extent of my experience.

fatboy
10-06-2005, 02:38 PM
I know how to settle this barometric thing, lets all count the number of crappie Jerry, Darryl, Richard and Tom has posted on here versus how many Moose has posted that he has caught. That should show pretty quick who knows what in the hell they are talking about and who spends too much time on reading and not doing.

J White
10-06-2005, 03:08 PM
Me likewise, Pox - if I had a boat that wouldn't sink, 30 wouldn't stop me.
Ever had to wear a chin strap to keep your hat on fishin'? Bet you have.
Or my favorite - gust one day stood up three out of four rods out in holders,
parallel to the water, pulling jigs - blew them straight up, 90 deg. Whoosh!
Went to grabbin' rods, thought they were gonna leave without me. :D

Moose1am
10-06-2005, 04:01 PM
Go read this article please.
http://www.midcurrent.com/articles/techniques/ross_pressure_myth.aspx

Maybe you won't take my word for it but it you really wish to learn I hope you take his doctors words for it.

And Like I said Kevin VanDan also says the same thing as the doctor. And he has won a lot more fishing tournaments on unfamilar waters than most everyone. He is one smart fishermen who most people have a lot of respect for. He looks at a new lake and figures out where the fish will be time after time and wins mega bucks doing it. That to me says a lot.

Fatboy your idea on how to settle the debate would not work. Reasoning and knowlege are what's needed to decide which environmental factors of the weather really truely effects the fishing.

Please at least read the article written by the fisheries doctor.




I know how to settle this barometric thing, lets all count the number of crappie Jerry, Darryl, Richard and Tom has posted on here versus how many Moose has posted that he has caught. That should show pretty quick who knows what in the hell they are talking about and who spends too much time on reading and not doing.

fatboy
10-06-2005, 04:43 PM
Yeah Moose, i guess your right. I don't know what I was thinking. I guess all these people on here would naturally think your a much better fisherman than the people who post their catches when you post no pics at all to back up your claims. Gee, what was I thinking.

Jerry Blake
10-06-2005, 05:19 PM
Go read this article please.
http://www.midcurrent.com/articles/techniques/ross_pressure_myth.aspx

Maybe you won't take my word for it but it you really wish to learn I hope you take his doctors words for it.

And Like I said Kevin VanDan also says the same thing as the doctor. And he has won a lot more fishing tournaments on unfamilar waters than most everyone. He is one smart fishermen who most people have a lot of respect for. He looks at a new lake and figures out where the fish will be time after time and wins mega bucks doing it. That to me says a lot.

Fatboy your idea on how to settle the debate would not work. Reasoning and knowlege are what's needed to decide which environmental factors of the weather really truely effects the fishing.

Please at least read the article written by the fisheries doctor.

Uh, Moose it's Kevin VanDam and I don't think he bass fishes in the ocean. Here's what Kevin VanDam says - note what he says about sunlight. Also note the line that sates, "Indeed, a cold front will slow down the fishing action most of the time".

http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0965040909/ref=sib_fs_top/002-2539521-8879208?%5Fencoding=UTF8&p=S00G&checkSum=1G0vslJL6s1ox9ufQtJUJXYhlwqHN02pADCLopxWd Mc%3D#reader-link

fatboy
10-06-2005, 05:24 PM
But Jerry, your only a professional crappie guide with an excellant business and repeat customers from all over the country, you need to read more books instead of fishing all the time. LOL A Purdue graduate who can't afford to fish and only reads thirty year old books that dad gave him is much smarter than you. LOL, god I love this.

J White
10-06-2005, 05:27 PM
fb, hope you know you keepin me up past bedtime reading all this :D
fraid it'll all be deleted in the morn, and I'll miss somethin'

Jerry Blake
10-06-2005, 05:31 PM
Well, I'm done on the subject - don't see the point. Don't know why I let myself get sucked in. I guess misinformation and someone misquoting others are my pet peeves.